Creating a global online library will spread knowledge in the quickest way to the most people

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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Strong Words Of Praise for the Google library project from Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan. She says beyond the emerging legal challenges, we must not lose sight of the transformative nature of Google's plan -- or the good that can come from it. "Imagine what this means for scholars, school kids and you, who, until now, might have discovered only a fraction of the material written on any subject.

NS tale slays Atwood giant in Canada Reads

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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slashgirl writes "'Rockbound, a 1928 novel by little-known author Frank Parker Day, has emerged victorious in CBC's annual Canada Reads book battle.'

'In a classic David-and-Goliath confrontation, Rockbound defeated Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake, a heavy-hitter that has been nominated for some of the world's most prestigious literary prizes over the past two years, including the Orange, Booker and Giller prizes. The dystopian novel is also currently competing for the 2005 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.'

Board Member Rebuts Papers "Anti-Library" Campaign

Submitted by rochelle on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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Jay writes "'Rebutting the newspaper's anti-library campaign' is a letter submitted in response to a recent editorial about furnishings for the new library. The article, entitled: "To sit or not to sit: The $329,000 question," appeared in The Daily Dispatch on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2005.

It's a long article but shows a strong support for a new library renovation project by a member of the Board of Trustees of H. Leslie Perry Memorial Library H. Leslie Perry Memorial Library in Henderson, North Carolina.
Excerpts from the article:

"Another gauge of how important the library is to the community is the astounding level of donations the project has received from our community, again despite the bad press from the Dispatch. When funds were raised to build the YMCA in 1988, contributions totaled approximately $1,600,000."

"My own concerns for the library include that critical issue of jobs, but they cover more ground than that. First, the public library is the only institution I know of in any community that directly serves people of every age in the broadest circumstances. It serves people who are young and old, rich and poor, lying in a sick bed or out and about in the bloom of health, God-fearing or atheist, Democrat or Republican, employed or looking to find a job. Because the library serves people from so many different backgrounds and circumstances, it supports the missions of many other institutions in our community, particularly the schools."

Library Flasher Caught

Submitted by rochelle on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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A man accused of exposing himself to two young girls at Fairfax County (VA) libraries this past week, has been arrested after one of the girls alerted library staff. More here at ABC7 news. Also of interest are the comments that accompany the story.
Because of cell phones, it may be harder for flashers to get away with public activity. This guy's career is definitely over.

Ingram changes the rules

Submitted by rochelle on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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librarydragon1 writes "Just got this from our library system lisserve If your vendor is Ingram, and you're expecting the new HP book to to be out for your patrons this Saturday, don't hold your breath:
"Hi, all. I just had a disturbing conversation with Customer Service at
Ingram Books. Apparently, if you have pre-ordered less than 10 copies of
Harry Potter from them, they will not deliver on time for Saturday's release
date. I was told that they will be shipped on Friday for Monday delivery.

Labeling YA books

Submitted by rochelle on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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Suzanne writes "A library trustee in Guilderland, NY, wants to put labels on YA novels that have "racy" content. He says he doesn't object to the descriptions of sex, just that books containing the descriptions are available to young teens.
If all these attempts at library labeling and restrictions continue and are successful, I envision future libraries being made up of lots of little rooms, each with a bouncer at the door. More from the

Need for First Amendment Education

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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Kathleen writes "Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, First Lady of Pennsylvania has stated, "The only way to hold on to our freedom is to give it away -- and liberally -- to those who come after us. In your own sphere of influence, in your own way, I invite you to join with me and give back meaning to the word "citizen." Concerned by a recent study that demonstrates a decline in understandidng of the First Amendment, Judge Rendell advocates citizenship education.

Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived?

Submitted by rochelle on Tue, 11/02/1999 - 11:00
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Anonymous Patron writes "Over @Slate, Stephen Metcalf asks Uncle Tom's Children - Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived? We have here an interesting puzzle. How has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived, and thrived, if it proved so offensive to the 20th-century aspirations of the African-Americans it helped liberate in the 19th? Why isn't Uncle Tom's Cabin like Wittgenstein's ladder: Once climbed, it is obsolete, and we ought to throw it away?