Happy 20 Years LISNews!

As usual, I forgot! 20 years ago on Nov 2nd I brought LISNews online. I can't possibly thank everyone who has helped LISNews over the past 20 years. Steve Glabraith, Steven M Cohen & Nabeal Ahmed, were all instrumental in helping me during the early years (when I needed it most!). We also had a few authors that posted like bloggers possessed and are still with us, BIRDIE especially, and Ieleene, Aaron, Rochelle, and a few other authors who helped out for awhile and moved on. Behind the scenes Joe Frazee helped me get the original LISNews server up and running. Over the years a few dedicated souls have tirelessly submitted stories; Bob Cox, Martin, Lee Hadden, Charles Davis, and many others. Stephen Kellat, for the podcast, Robin, Troy, Andy, Dan and all the LISNews authors deserve a big thank you and a pat on the back for all their hard work. LISNews is a collaborative site, and we all work together to make it great. I'd also like to thank everyone who has ever chipped in to pay for the server, submitted a story, wrote in their journal, left a comment, or just dropped by for a visit. Happy Birthday LISNews. Here's hoping we have a few more good years ahead of us!
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VIDEO: Multiple raccoons take over the library at Arkansas State

An Arkansas State University alumnus says he was surprised to spot a few curious critters running around the campus library.

Codie Clark, a math tutor, says he spotted at least two raccoons Sunday on the third floor of the university's Dean B. Ellis Library while waiting for a student to arrive for a tutoring session. Clark says other students then cornered one raccoon.

https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2019/oct/29/multiple-raccoons-take-over-library-arkansas...

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Late author Philip Roth left $2M to an N.J. library, report says

In addition to his entire personal book collection, late author Phillip Roth also donated at least $2 million to the library in his New Jersey hometown. The Pulitzer Prize winner, before his death last year, arranged to donate the money to the Newark Public Library, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday. The money, the report said, a large chunk of his $10 million estate, would be used to bolster the library’s general collection. And the gift included additional funding to help renovate a space to house his 7,000-book personal collection, it said. https://www.nj.com/essex/2019/10/late-author-philip-roth-left-2m-to-an-nj-library-report-says.html

Amazon's latest antitrust foe: Libraries

Driving the news: The American Library Association said libraries are struggling to acquire ebooks because of an "abuse of market power by dominant firms," as part of a report for the House Judiciary Committee's digital markets investigation that was made public Thursday.

https://www.axios.com/amazon-library-ala-antitrust-ebooks-679e8e4d-97bc-4b91-98dc-353d607e6c...

A Word of Caution

In a 1972 book - Man and the Computer - there is a chapter on "The Library of the Future." The chapter ends with a word of caution. You can see the caution here.
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America Needs More Community Spaces - Like Libraries

Americans who live in communities with a rich array of neighborhood amenities are twice as likely to talk daily with their neighbors as those whose neighborhoods have few amenities. More important, given widespread interest in the topic of loneliness in America, people living in amenity-rich communities are much less likely to feel isolated from others, regardless of whether they live in large cities, suburbs, or small towns. Fifty-five percent of Americans living in low-amenity suburbs report a high degree of social isolation, while fewer than one-third of suburbanites in amenity-dense neighborhoods report feeling so isolated.
From America Needs More Community Spaces - The Atlantic
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Your internet data is rotting

Free storage is a great offer, but sometimes you only get what you pay for. The internet is neither secure nor permanent. It never promised to be, and users should not assume that it will become so. Parts are rotting and corroding and collapsing as I type this. Just hope and plan to not be resting on that platform when it falls.
From Your internet data is rotting
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A Memorial for a Slain Sacramento Librarian

From KCRA, Sacramento city leaders honor slain librarian Amber Clark, a supervisor at the branch, who was shot and killed in the library parking lot last December as she was leaving work. Sacramento police arrested 56-year-old Ronald Seay in connection with Clark’s death.
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11 Authors on Their One-Word Book Titles

At Merriam-Webster we know that words have the power to shape worlds both real and imagined. And we know that writing is hard work. To distill a story, its characters, and all the associated emotions into a single word is no small feat. That’s why we’ve partnered with eleven of our favorite authors who have shared the story and significance behind their one-word-title books.
From 11 Authors on Their One-Word Book Titles | Merriam-Webster
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BBC - Future - Why there’s so little left of the early internet

It took nearly five years into the internet’s life before anyone made a concerted effort to archive it. Much of our earliest online activity has disappeared.
From BBC - Future - Why there’s so little left of the early internet
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In Praise of Public Libraries

...from the New York Review of Books, an opinion piece by Sue Halpern..

A public library is predicated on an ethos of sharing and egalitarianism. It is nonjudgmental. It stands in stark opposition to the materialism and individualism that otherwise define our culture. It is defiantly, proudly, communal. Even our little book-lined room, with its mismatched furniture and worn carpet, was, as the sociologist Eric Klinenberg reminds us libraries were once called, a palace for the people. Read it here: https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2019/04/18/in-praise-of-public-libraries/

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Weird Librarian Stories from Reddit

According to Book Riot, these stories 'will make you cringe.'
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The Library of Congress wants to attract more visitors. Will that undermine its mission?

Some critics have expressed concerns that if the plan is approved, the library’s intellectual focus will be sacrificed to an avalanche of exhibitions and the increased foot traffic that would result. In an age when facts seem to be up for grabs and information flows quickly but often with little authority, they say, the library’s academic mission is more critical than ever. But Hayden and her team — which includes two senior executives with museum backgrounds — say the changes would spark renewed interest in the library’s history, its collections and its role as a research institution.
From The Library of Congress wants to attract more visitors. Will that undermine its mission? - The Washington Post

Behold, the Tiniest of Books - The New York Times

Most of the books in the exhibit are about one to three inches high and would nestle easily in the palm of your hand. Some are the size of a thumbnail. (There are also a few ultra-micro-miniatures, with no dimension greater than a quarter of an inch; one, shockingly, looks to be about as big as the period in this sentence.) The oldest is a cuneiform tablet from about 2300 B.C.; the newest was published last year. They are valued in the tens or hundreds or thousands of dollars; the rarest of miniature antiquarian books can sell in the six or even seven figures.
From Behold, the Tiniest of Books - The New York Times
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It's Time We Talk About Librarians and Money

What’s that thing they always say about if you do something you love you’ll never work a day in your life? I mean that’s true and all—when you love something, it can feel less like work and more like passion—but I’m also here to tell you that tenderness gets a little strained when you try to use it to pay your overdue power bill. That’s right, I’m talking about a library paycheck! That tiny little figure that gets added to your bank account after you work a 40-hour plus work week. It’s not fun to talk about money (it’s truly a nightmare), but it’s something we all understand. We need to make a salary so we can afford to live. We need to get paid.
From It's Time We Talk About Librarians and Money | Literary Hub
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The greatest of all novels: War and Peace

Just 150 years ago, in 1869, Tolstoy published the final installment of War and Peace, often regarded as the greatest of all novels. In his time, Tolstoy was known as a nyetovshchik—someone who says nyet, or no, to all prevailing opinion—and War and Peace discredits the prevailing views of the radical intelligentsia, then just beginning to dominate Russian thought. The intelligentsia’s way of thinking is still very much with us and so Tolstoy’s critique is, if anything, even more pertinent today.
From The greatest of all novels by Gary Saul Morson | The New Criterion
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My Library Card Made Me Less of a Picky Reader

Joining the library saved me money and space, yes. It also permanently changed the way I read. Where I used to heavily research books before committing to them, I now borrow indiscriminately. There’s no fear! If I hate the book, it doesn’t matter; it’s going back into circulation when I’m done. This means I can pick up volumes that previously intimidated me. I tear through books I may have overlooked in the past for lack of desire to spend money on them. Not every book I take out of the library becomes a new favorite, but the experience of reading them is enriching nonetheless.
From My Library Card Made Me Less of a Picky Reader | Book Riot
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Rural Nebraska libraries reinventing themselves in 'makerspace' movement

The results after the first two 20-week cycles indicates the "Library Innovation Studios: Transforming Rural Communities" project, a partnership between the library commission, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska Innovation Studio, Nebraska Extension and the Regional Library Systems, has found an appetite for makerspaces in public libraries from Plattsmouth to Ainsworth, Loup City to North Platte.
From Rural Nebraska libraries reinventing themselves in 'makerspace' movement | Education | journalstar.com

Why California Libraries Are Ditching Fines on Overdue Materials

“Collecting fines is the single greatest point of friction between library staff and patrons,” he told the San Francisco Public Library Commission last month. The commission voted that night to make San Francisco the latest library system to go fine-free. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors needs to vote on the library’s recommendations, but Mayor London Breed has already voiced her support.
From Why California Libraries Are Ditching Fines on Overdue Materials - GV Wire
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Growing up in a house full of books is major boost to literacy and numeracy, study finds

Research data from 160,000 adults in 31 countries concludes that a sizeable home library gave teen school leavers skills equivalent to university graduates who didn’t read
From Growing up in a house full of books is major boost to literacy and numeracy, study finds | Books | The Guardian
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