Opting out of Doubleclicks cookies

You can stop Doubleclick\'s ability to track you, on and off line, HERE .

If you don\'t opt out, Doubleclick\'s ads have the ability to track you over multiple sites, and match that up with their database.
DoubleClick\'s new privacy policy states that the company plans to use this information to
build a database profiling consumers. The database will include consumers\' names;
addresses; retail, catalog and online purchase histories; and demographic data, according
to the policy.

Web Filter Blocks More Gun Sites

Topic

A Story on
Surf Watch, the filtering software, and the companies
decision to block out Gun Sites.
Concerned by violence in the nation\'s schools, a California
company has beefed up its online filtering software to block
thousands of new Web pages hawking guns and ammunition.

SurfWatch Software officials said the new version
shipped in November filters Web sites that \"primarily sell
guns, weapons, ammunition or poisonous substances and sites
that allow online purchasing or ordering information,
including lists of prices and dealer locations.\"

The renewed effort follows a series of school shootings
in recent years, especially April\'s deadly rampage at
Columbine High School in Colorado.

For years, companies that make Internet filtering
software have blocked guns and ammunition sites...

Law Would Prosecute Libraries for Kiddie Porn

Yahoo News
picked up a story from Soutch Carolina HERE on an interesting new law proposal.

A state lawmaker has proposed a bill that would hold
library officials criminally liable if they let children see
pornography online.
The legislation, introduced by Sen. Mike Fair, R-Greenville,
was inspired by the Greenville County Library Board\'s
refusal to install Internet filtering software on computers.
Using filtering software to block adult Web sites in the
nation\'s libraries has been a controversial issue between
free-speech advocates and those wanting to shield kids from
the seamier side of

Coping with Database Protection Laws

Topic

Andy Oram wrote an article on the consequences of database protection Laws, HERE that is worth a read.
The 1990s have witnessed the creation of an entire new category of intellectual property—the collection—as well as a new (sui generis) right of ownership. In this article I will try to summarize the issues that content providers and their representatives should be alert to when dealing with laws concerning “collections of information”, a term I will use interchangeably with the term databases.

Good News for Disabled Individuals and Information

Topic

Bill Stark writes \"28,000,000 Americans have a hearing loss, and this sensory loss means that much informational and entertainment media is not accessible to them. The Captioned Media Program (CMP) at www.cfv.org is a free-loan open-captioned media program for these persons, their families, and the information professionals who serve them. Sponsored by the U. S. Department of Education, CMP has over 4,000 items available for loan to qualified users. \"

Ebook resources

CNET has a great beginners guide to ebooks HERE
But don\'t say goodbye to your hardcovers just yet. No one knows if the majority will
take to digitized reading. Changing paradigms--especially for something as basic as reading--takes time,
and the quirks of these early-generation products won\'t help. Even under the best circumstances, it will be
years before you see e-books on every street corner.

Long Domain Names: How Long Is Too Long?

Topic

Internetnews
is
Reporting that you can now register a domain name up to 67 characters long.

With the most recent count of Web sites reported to be a whopping 9 million and growing, the demand for domain names is exploding as well. To supply more choices to those looking to label their Web sites, a number of domain name registrars have enabled users to register names as long as 67 characters.

netLibrary Donating 150,000 eBooks to 100 top PL

LJDigital has a Press Release from NetLibrary

To further the use of electronic books in libraries, e-book publisher netLibrary has
announced it is donating 150,000 digital volumes to 100 public libraries across the country
during the coming months. The \"netLibrary eBook Intorduction Program\" will provide free
24-hour access to the titles for six months, at which time the participating libraries will
have the option to purchase as many of the volumes as they desire.