Internet

Anonymous publishing on the web

CNET has a Story on a new idea from AT&T. PUBLIS is a new system that will allow anonymous publishing on the web. Since it allows free distribution of files online, without any checks by copyright owners or law enforcement, Publius has been talked about in the same breath as Napster, Gnutella and Freenet.

\"\"The ultimate kick for us as developers is if some organization such as Amnesty International starts to refer people to our systems,\" said Avi Rubin, the AT&T Labs researcher who is leading the project. \"We\'d like to see it used in the real world, by real world people who can\'t express their ideas.\" -- Read More

Looksmart Extends its Reach with New Portal Partnerships

Looksmart always defined itself as a competitor to Yahoo! It is spreading its tentacles into many major web portals such that more and more Internet users will be treated to the handiwork of Looksmart\'s staff of 200 professional editors. -- Read More

The COPA Commission Reports

A Report from Wired on the final hearings at the COPA Commission. They seem to think the problem (Porn on the web) has gotten worse, and the technology to stop it (filters) has gotten better. This leads them to believe the injunction should be lifted and the law should be enforced.

\"If the government can establish that the problem has gotten worse and that the technology has gotten much better, it then becomes easier for the government to prevail,\" -- Read More

Stay of Execution

In case you haven\'t heard by now, Napster was not shut down on Friday. If you\'d like to learn more on this subject, O\'Reillynet.com has a Story that compare all the latest and greatest P2P software. This is technology that is changing how people share information, and is worth keeping up on.

\"In essence, Gnutella and Freenet represent a new step in distributed information systems. Each is a system for searching for information; each returns information without telling you where it came from. They are innovative in the areas of distributed information storage, information retrieval, and network architecture. But they differ significantly in both goals and implementation\" -- Read More

More on Napster

Slashdot has a nice round up, that talks about all the alternatives and ideas. After reading the the Preliminary Injunction Brief (pdf file) it looks like Napster is in big trouble. Technically Napster was not shutdown, they are just not allowed to do anything that is even close to illegal (no major label music, no links to the music, etc...). Which is basically like saying, no one who will ever speed or run a stop sign is allowed to drive. It doesn\'t outlaw cars, but no one is driving.

On a realated note, check out DOCSTER a form of instant document delivery, that builds in copyright and organization for libraries.Read on for more stories from around the web. -- Read More

Study finds Web bigger than we think

The \"invisible Web\" or the millions of pages not indexed at Yahoo! or Google is much bigger than most people thought. A company called BrightPlanet says there are now about 550 billion documents stored on the Web. They say Internet search engines index about 1 billion pages, although Google claims more than a billion. They say the problem lies in how search engines index the web. Search engines rely on technology that generally identifies \"static\" pages, rather than the \"dynamic\" information stored in databases. You can get the Report Here -- Read More

Hollywood looks to kill hyperlinks

CNET has a Story that covers all the latest in the never ending world of internet lawsuits. Some of these cases challenge the very Existence of the Web

\"It all depends on how broadly the opinion is written,\" said Eugene Volokh, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles. \"If an opinion is quite broad, it would interfere with a lot of things on the Web. But I don\'t think it\'s likely that a court would issue such an opinion.\" -- Read More

Napster Shut Down

Napster went to court today in CA and lost. My guess is that will be the end of Napster as users switch to the alternatives that will not be shut down because they have no central servers. (Hotline OR Gnuetella OR scour.net, OR etc...)
ZDNet has a nice round up, and as always Slashdot covers it well.

Scientists Spot Net\'s Achilles Heel

Internet Week has a cool Story on how weak the internet may be. The trouble lies in relying on a couple large nodes that handle a significant amount of the traffic. The web isn\'t as webbed as we thought.

\"``The reason this is so is because there are a couple of very big nodes and all messages are going through them. But if someone maliciously takes down the biggest nodes you can harm the system in incredible ways. You can very easily destroy the function of the Internet,\'\' Albert-Lazlo Barabasi, a structural physicist, said in a telephone interview. \" -- Read More

Web NOT Hurting Newspapers

Wired has a Story that says all is well in the newspaper world. Contrary to popular belief, the web hasn\'t killed newspapers, now they make more money from ads on the web sites.

\"Fear of the Internet is turning out to be totally far-fetched,\" he told Reuters. \"There are more pluses than minuses for newspapers.\"

He pointed to Monday\'s figures from Knight Ridder Inc., the No. 2 U.S. newspaper chain, which publishes 32 daily newspapers with a daily readership of 8.7 million and 12.9 million on Sundays. -- Read More

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