Cookies for all of us

The NYTimes has a nice Story on the guy that invented \"cookies\", Lou Montulli. He was employee #9 at Netscape... Just imagine those stock options! He left Netscape in 1998, a millionaire many times over to create and they say he has since left that company as well.
It\'s a good story for a little piece of web history, and they also cover all the privacy troubles with cookies.

\"A recent survey by Public Opinion Strategies, a Republican polling organization, found that 67 percent of Americans identify online privacy as a big concern — far more than those who identify fighting crime (55 percent) or building an antimissile shield (22 percent).\"


The Web Can Shrink a Big World

at the New York Times
- A nice
synopsis in of internet search techniques, tools and
tips. With advice from librarian, Ms. Osofsky, from the

\"People think with the Internet, you push a button and
get an answer,\" says Marcia Osofsky, a librarian at the
New York Public Library telephone reference desk.\"

Full Story


Searchopolis Closes Up Shop

Searchopolis has gone the way of the dinosaur. On August 18, they closed up shop and posted the following message: \"As of August 18, 2001, will no longer offer educational resources, including filtered search. We apologize to those users who have enjoyed Searchopolis\' free services and thank you for your support. While N2H2 makes no recommendation regarding alternative sources for filtered search, a recent major children\'s software magazine gave the following filtered search engines high marks:\" Yahooligans and Ask Jeeves for Kids. no more.


Google May Go the Way of Pay for Fresher Web

It looks as though Google may decide to start charging site owners for fresh updates. According to the article at ZDNet UK, \"Google appears to be developing a service aimed at extracting revenue from online firms that want a fresher search of their Web sites, following in the footsteps of rivals AltaVista and Inktomi. more...


Napster Bootleggers

For the Tornado Insider, Marco Frojo writes...

\"In order to escape the tough competition that characterises the online music market, Hifind has decided to concentrate on a small but profitable niche, that of music for the world of cinema, radio and television production. In this way, while Napster continues to suffer amid general indifference, waiting for its new owner, Bertelsmann, to decide how to commercially exploit the company that cost more than a billion dollars, the Hamburg-based company (through its own subsidiary, Initaudio) has presented its new platform Audience, which should make its online debut in October, at the Internationale Funkaustellung (IFA) in Berlin.\" more...


.info War Heats Up

With three weeks to go before .info is officially launched, folks are beginning to slug it out over real estate in the new domain:

Starting Wednesday, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) will begin deciding disputes between rival registrants vying for ownership of sites in the dot-info domain.

\"We\'re going to see how well it actually works,\" said Roland LaPlante, Afilias\' chief marketing officer, who estimates that domain name registrants will file between several hundred and several thousand challenges between now and Dec. 26, the deadline for filing. . .

More from Wired News and even more from the Independent.


The Internet is Messing with Everybody

For The Seattle Times, Jerry Large writes...

\"The Internet is messing with everybody: businesses trying to make money off of it, businesses trying to figure out how not to be killed by it, book publishers, record companies, newspapers, everybody. Rules that have held for decades, or in some instances centuries, don\'t cut it in cyberspace... Because libraries are deeply embedded with a First Amendment sensibility, they have, at their best, fought for the broadest inclusion. But as a practical matter, their job has always included selectivity. They make judgments about which books and other materials they will keep in their limited space. The Internet upset that role. The Internet, while not boundless, is too vast to be policed or cataloged...\" more...


Indian Street Kids Crack the Internet

An initiative by the Indian government and the World Bank is giving illiterate, homeless kids in Delhi access to computers, with interesting results:

In the slums of Delhi, an experiment has shown how illiterate street children can quickly teach themselves the rudiments of computers and the internet.
The aim of the experiment . . . was to see what role computers might play in educating India\'s illiterate millions. . . [researchers] found that within days the children were able to browse the internet, cut and paste copy, drag and drop items and create folders. One of the things they particularly liked was drawing, discovering how to use the MSpaint programme to create paintings.

More from BBC News. Thanks to Robot Wisdom.


Pirated books herald the new Napster

British Internet monitoring company Envisional have carried out research which shows that over 7,000 copyrighted books are now available free on the internet. These pirated works are being swapped \"on Napster-like file-sharing systems\". The most popular are apparently science fiction and fantasy. Read the full story from Excite News.
Internet monitoring - hmm, sounds like what I do all day!


Internet Makes Research \'Too Easy\'

Yahoo News reports on the results of a new survey conducted for the Associated Press showing half of respondents rating Internet skills as very important for school. Most students were able to find the majority of the resources they need for writing assignments on the internet:
``Most students depend on the Internet to get their stuff,\'\' said 16-year-old Jeff Sands of Horsham, Pa. ``You can most find anything by going onto Yahoo,\'\' an Internet search engine.
``The Internet makes it too easy sometimes,\'\' said Campbell, a 17-year-old from New London, Pa. ``I still think you should go to the library.



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