Internet Still Archiving

There\'s more on in The Washington Post, in case you missed the earlier stories we ran.
Volunteers from all over are joining the Library of Congress and Internet Archive in San Francisco to create a special digital archive, one that aims to re-create what appeared online in the hours, days and weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks. They plan to publish their re-creation on Oct. 11.

\"There is the potential for a new level of civic activism emerging,\" said Kirsten Foot, a professor at the University of Washington who is co-directing the effort. \"There\'s been a huge surge in people feeling compelled to make statements about the events online. We see it everywhere online, and we want to preserve a record of it.\"


Library \'Blogs in the News

Marylaine Block has written a relatively high profile piece on library weblogs in which our own Blake Carver is quoted:

For many of the self-publishers, it\'s a chance to render a service, to fill a hole in the web of information. Jenny Levine was one of the first to do this, back in 1995, with her late lamented Librarians\' Site du Jour. \"I began it to bring home to the librarians in my system the power of this new tool,\" she says. \"The two biggest complaints I heard about the net were that people didn\'t have time for this new stuff, and, even if they did, they didn\'t know what to do once they got online. So my goal was twofold: 1) to highlight valuable resources, and 2) to give librarians a reason to go on the web every day . . . \"

More from Library Journal (registration required.)


Alta Vista Gets New CEO - Axes 160 Employees

If a person didn\'t know better, one might make the assumption that Alta Vista\'s days are numbered. They\'re revamping, cutting costs, laying people off, and closing up shop in one location, but they\'ve got a new CEO. Will he be able to jump start the failing engine? more... from NewsBytes.


FBI tracks Internet role in helping terrorists

Debby Auchter writes \"From the South Florida Sun-Sentinel ( comes this interesting story about the anonymity of Internet communications and how someone can get away with murder...literally.

The men suspected of masterminding last week’s terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington may have found a perfect hiding place to develop their plot — the virtual anonymity of public computers to tap the Internet. U.S. intelligence agencies have known for years that e-mail, chat rooms and instant messages are a common mode for communication among terrorists. But the volume of Internet discussions and a lack of foreign-language specialists have thwarted the ability of authorities to effectively monitor online traffic.
Full Story \"


Internet users give \'not-coms\' the cold shoulder

The Buffalo News is running This AP Story on the new \"not-coms\", .aero. biz, .coop, .info, .museum, .name, and .pro (why is there no .lib in this list?).

They say many individuals, companies and groups are passing on the new domains. \".info\" is scheduled to become active Wednesday, \".biz\" on Oct. 1 and \".name\" on Dec. 13. Of the 50,000 \".info\" names registered through Aug. 27, about 60 percent came from outside the United States, 60% of .com\'s are in the US.

\"I\'ve thought about these, but I can use only so many domain names,\" Bell said. \"I do think \".com\' will for a long time be the first thought of.\"


Library PCs yield clues

Two stories that follow up on the public library / terrorist connections.

One From The Sun Sentinel and One From They both say more or less the same thing, it looks like several of the hijackers suspected in last week\'s terrorist attacks used Broward County public libraries web terminals to buy tickets, check the weather, and do some other things.

\"The hijack suspects\' familiarity with the workings of e-mail and the Internet suggests they were sufficiently proficient to communicate with one another without leaving an electronic trail that could draw the scrutiny of law enforcement\"


\'Hacktivism\' Spike Expected Following U.S. Retaliations

A sharp increase in hacks of U.S. web sites is expected following any U.S. retaliation for Tuesday\'s

Security experts and federal cyber-crime officials are bracing for a surge in nefarious Internet activity once the U.S. retaliates for Tuesday\'s terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. . . . Chris Rouland, director of “X-Force,” the research and development team for Atlanta-based Internet Security Systems Inc., said aside from a few loosely organized denial-of-service attacks against sites in the Middle East, ISS hasn’t yet seen signs of a corresponding cyber-threat. Yet, that is likely to change in the coming days, Rouland said, as U.S. authorities zero in on the source of the attacks and take retaliatory action.

More from Newsbytes.


Anti-Arab Hate Speech Explodes on Web

Wired has a disheartening article on the explosion of anti-Arab and anti-Muslim hate speech on the Web:

As the volume of anti-Arab hate speech on the Internet cranked to full blast Wednesday, U.S. Muslims reported rampant harassment on- and offline. Although the U.S. government has yet to finger a perpetrator in Tuesday\'s attack, several lines of investigation point to the involvement of an Arab country. Now America\'s estimated 7 million Muslims are bracing for the backlash. \"We\'ve got reports from all over the country,\" said Joshua Salaam, the Civil Rights coordinator for the Council on American Islamic Relations, a nonprofit group dedicated to promoting a positive image of Muslims in America. \"People are reporting stuff to us from chat rooms that is absolutely hateful. Our own website has been bombarded with death threats.\"



A Peek @ The Web

Wired has Who Said the Web Fell Apart?. They say the Web was criticized for buckling under user demand and failing to provide help and information, but really it was merely a matter of knowing where to look. Sure, CNN and The NY Times crapped out for awhile, even Slashdot creaked along, but sites like Metafilter and Cam kept us up to date.
The FBI has also released a
cyberthreat advisory beef up physical and cybersecurity efforts.

CNN says Internet proves vital communications tool
, For many, one of the first reactions to the news of Tuesday\'s terrorist attacks was to turn to the Web.

The NYTimes also ran a Story that quoted Cam, and provided a nice look at how many different websites were doing.

\"The need to connect is intense,\" said Donna Hoffman, a professor who studies the Web and Web commerce at Vanderbilt University. \"While the network TV stations blather, the Internet carries the news and connects the masses in a true interactive sob.\"


Contrary to Early Reports, Web Shines During Crisis

Contrary to early reports that the Web buckled under the heavy traffic that followed the NYC/DC attacks, it appears to have provided a vital and flexible tool for communication. Wired\'s Leander Kahney writes:

The Web has been criticized in many corners for failing to adequately cover the unfolding horror of Tuesday\'s terrorist attacks in New York and Washington.

On a day when many people were glued to the TV, the complaint was that the Net initially failed to provide the kind of in-depth coverage available from the TV networks. People have complained that sites for the big news organizations, like CNN, The New York Times and the BBC, were unavailable for much of the day due to high traffic.
And what only newspapers and portals were available simply ran wire copy. But under the radar, the Net responded magnificently; it was just a matter of knowing where to look. Immediately after the attack, community websites, discussion groups and mailing lists immediately lit up with vast amounts of information about the attacks . . .

More, still more from CNN and even more from the Washington Post.



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