Authors

Happy Birthday Charles Dickens

The great English novelist Charles Dickens was born this day in 1812. Happy birthday Boz!

American Icons: The Outsiders

 

Susan Eloise Hinton was a teenager when she wrote The Outsiders, the story of rival gangs in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She used the pen name “S.E.” so readers wouldn’t know she was a girl, and bought a Camaro with the earnings. “Some of [the novel’s] faults, like its over-the-top emotions and drama, are what make it so popular because that’s the way kids really feel,” she says. “You’ve got to have the hormones going before you really appreciate that book.”

Librarian Elizabeth Bird says the novel’s unresolved class struggle resonates as powerfully as ever. “There are always going to be the haves and the have-nots — the divide is getting bigger and bigger all the time. And this book talks about that. A lot of books for kids and teens do not.” -- Read More

Park School librarian Laura Amy Schlitz wins 2nd Newbery honor

Park School librarian Laura Amy Schlitz on Monday joined a select group of authors to be twice honored with one of the nation's top prizes for children's literature. - 9030z8e

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What Turned Jaron Lanier Against the Web?

Silicon Valley visionary, pioneer of virtual reality, recants his faith in Web 2.0: "You can draw an analogy to what happened with communism, where at some point you just have to say there’s too much wrong with these experiments”

Full article - Smithsonian Magazine

'Bartholomew Biddle': A Writer's 15-Year Adventure

Gary Ross has penned and directed some big Hollywood hits like Big, Pleasantville and The Hunger Games. But for the past 15 years, his obsession has been something much more personal: a Dr. Seuss-ian children's book called Bartholomew Biddle and the Very Big Wind.

It started when Ross got a call in 1996 from fellow screenwriter David Koepp. Koepp was up against a tight budget and approaching deadline with his debut directorial effort, The Trigger Effect. Its heroine had to read an as-yet-unwritten bedtime story to her child.

Koepp wanted Ross to write that story. "The only thing is, I don't have any money," he told Ross. "So it has to be for free, and I've got to shoot the day after tomorrow."

Full piece (7 minute author interview on NPR)

If you listen to the author interview you find out he created part of the fictional book for the movie The Trigger Effect. I assume they did not use a real children's book to avoid paying royalties.

Publishers brace for authors to reclaim book rights in 2013

A copyright law that lets authors break contracts after 35 years will start taking effect in January. The law, which is meant to give authors like Stephen King and Judy Blume a “second bite at the apple,” could provide yet another disruption for traditional publishers.

Reading 'Dune,' My Junior-High Survival Guide

Author Leigh Bardugo says that when she was 12, Dune wasn't just an escape — it changed her world.

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Reading 125 Titles A Year? That's 'One For The Books'

Joe Queenan reads so many books, it's amazing that he can also find time to write them. Queenan estimates he's read between 6,000 and 7,000 books total, at a rate of about 125 books a year. His latest work, One for the Books, is all about what he reads and why.

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Google, My Co-Author

"I didn't really write the book so much as Google it. It's amazing what a major, major literary figure can accomplish chained to his keyboard in a cloud of his own stench."

John Grisham Wishes President Obama would read Fifty Shades of Grey

The author, most recently, of “The Racketeer” wishes President Obama would read “Fifty Shades of Grey”: “Maybe it would loosen him up a bit.”

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