Technology

Digital Audio Books

Wired has this story on the next generation of talking books.\"...digital talking books, users can navigate through different pages, chapters, or even sentences. People can search for a given word, or start the audio at any given point using a special keypad.\" -- Read More

All-in-One Search Page with a Twist

David Novak writes \"An All-in-One search page you place on your computer. Many of the elements are new like a single form search engine (which translates syntax) and clickable image maps to international newspapers and search engines.


Comes from The Spire Project, publisher of a large site on research techniques and the Information Research FAQ.


Download it, keep it, pass it to a friend. -- Read More

The Search Engine of the future...Human?!

The New York Times has this article on what search companies are doing in order to make their products more user friendly. They are using humans in order to fill a void that the engines have difficulty with. Hmmm, we now know where some of the Librarians have gone.\"To cope, many search engines have concluded that simply indexing more pages is not the answer. Instead, they have decided to rely on the one resource that was once considered a cop-out: human judgment. Search engines have become more like cyborgs, part human, part machine.\" -- Read More

Will e-books fall into music\'s piracy trap?

ZDNet has a very interesting Story on the coming E-Book revolution. They are worried about piracy as more books become digitized. Of course some folks already have a solution. DOCSTER should be useful in that it has copywrite concerns built in! Imagine all the researchers you know, with a new bibliographic management tool that combined file storage with a napster-like communications protocol -- docster. Be sure to check out OSS4LIB.org for more on this. Publishing executives are worried about the future.

\"We don\'t want to be in a reactive mode the way the recording industry is,\" says Peter Jovanovich, former chairman of the Association of American Publishers and chief executive of Pearson PLC\'s Pearson Education unit.\"

More on Docster... -- Read More

The Computer, Now a Fixture In U.S. Homes

Newsday has this article on a study by the National Science Foundation which states that 54% of homes now have computers.\"If you don\'t have a computer in your home, you\'re in the minority nationally, a federal poll has found. For the first time, more than half of American adults now have home computers, according to a National Science Foundation survey. And just under half are using their computers to go online.\" -- Read More

To See More Ads, Use the Magic Pen

The Standard has a scary Story on yet another plan to cram more ads into your life.

\"\"We don\'t think it\'s the Holy Grail,\" says Wired publisher Drew Shutte . \"But we think it\'s the precursor to something larger.\"Watermarks, bar codes and other hieroglyphics that essentially link printed pages to Web pages will start appearing in dozens of magazines within the next few months. \" -- Read More

Top Technology Trends for Libraries

Pat Ensor writes \"Top Technology Trends for Libraries: Y2K - from the Library and Information Technology Association

What technological issues have a good chance of affecting libraries in the next few years? A dozen leading members of the
Library and Information Technology Association are keeping up with that and discussing issues online and in person, so that
you can stay informed.

Read on for details.... -- Read More

Paper connected to the internet

R Hadden sent in this story from theNew Scientist, they have a very interesting Story on a nifty sounding paper.


\"IT\'S goodbye to the idea of the paperless office: a new electronic pen could bring paper back with a bang. Instead of tapping away on a computer keyboard, the new pen lets you scribble e-mails freehand on special paper and then send it across the Internet via your mobile phone.\" -- Read More

Encyclopedia Fits Into Palm of Hand

Excite News Has this interesting business-side oriented story on how Encyclopaedia Britannica\'s image has seen a dizzying transformation.

\"The new, gizmo-loving side of the august publisher showed through again Monday with the introduction of a software application that gives users of Palm handheld computers access to all 44 million words of the encyclopedia.

\"Britannica now goes wherever you go,\" said Don Yannias, chief executive officer of Britannica.com Inc., the Chicago encyclopedia publisher\'s digital arm.
\" -- Read More

Programming languages covered by First Amendment

News.com is reporting on an interesting court ruling in CA.

\"A federal appeals court today cleared the way for a law professor to post previously banned encryption software on the Internet, finding that computer code qualifies as speech protected by the First Amendment.

The decision hands the U.S. government yet another defeat in its efforts to keep intact federal rules limiting the export of encryption software. Academics and civil liberties groups have mounted several attacks on the regulations, winning a similar result before an appeals court in California, a decision currently under review.\" -- Read More

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