16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways

It’s not everyday you see a book that can be read in six completely different ways, and this small book from the National Library of Sweden is definitely an anomaly. According to Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel, this 16th century text has a special sixfold dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding with strategically placed clasps that makes it possible for six books to be neatly bound into one. This particular book contains devotional texts, including Martin Luther’s Der kleine Catechismus, which was printed in German between the 1550’s and 1570’s.

From 16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways - My Modern Met


Trailer - The End of the Tour

The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

US bookshop offering refunds for Go Set a Watchman

Brilliant Books in Michigan says customers are owed apologies for portrayal of Harper Lee’s long-lost manuscript as a ‘nice summer novel’ rather than an academic curiosity

From US bookshop offering refunds for Go Set a Watchman | Books | The Guardian


Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

"It really bothered me," she says. "The 47 million people on food stamps — and that's a big chunk of the population — don't have the same choices everyone else does."

Brown guessed that she could help people in SNAP, the federal government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, find ways to cook filling, nourishing and flavorful meals. So she set out to write a cookbook full of recipes anyone could make on a budget of just $4 a day.

The result is Good and Cheap, which is free online and has been downloaded over 700,000 times since Brown posted it on her website in June 2014. A July 2014 Kickstarter campaign also helped her raise $145,000 to print copies for people without computer access. And on July 21, the second edition was published with 30 new recipes.

Full story:


LGBT Titles Will Stay on Library Shelves

From KERA News:

Hood County (TX) Commissioners said today that two LGBT-themed library books for kids will stay on the shelves.

Dozens of residents concerned about the books spoke before the commissioners earlier today in Granbury. Some want to remove the books from the shelves of the public library. Others want LGBT books for kids moved to another part of the library.

Last month, the county's library advisory board voted to keep the books with one minor change. County attorney Lori Kaspar said the library director moved one of the books, “This Day in June,” from the kids section to the parenting shelves. The other book, "My Princess Boy," remains in the children's section.

Logistics: Shipping 'Go Set a Watchman' by July 14

WSJ's Jennifer Maloney and Tanya Rivero discuss logistics behind shipping Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman" to bookstores worldwide in time for the July 14 release date.


The NYT Looks at Watchman

From the New York Times, a review of the novel everyone has been waiting for, Go Set a Watchman. And you're not going to like the once upstanding character Atticus Finch:

In “Mockingbird,” Atticus was a role model for his children, Scout and Jem — their North Star, their hero, the most potent moral force in their lives. In “Watchman,” he becomes the source of grievous pain and disillusionment for the 26-year-old Scout (or Jean Louise, as she’s now known).

While written in the third person, “Watchman” reflects a grown-up Scout’s point of view: The novel is the story of how she returned home to Maycomb, Ala., for a visit — from New York City, where she has been living — and tried to grapple with her dismaying realization that Atticus and her longtime boyfriend Henry Clinton both have abhorrent views on race and segregation.


Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less

Subscription services for e-books—the so-called “Netflix for books” model—are also popping up everywhere. All-you-can-read startups like Scribd and Oyster vie with options from giants like Amazon and Google. But they’re facing a weird problem. Many hands have been wrung over the decline of the American book lover. According to a Gallup poll, the number of non-book-readers has nearly tripled since 1978. And according to the Pew Research Center, nearly a quarter of American adults have not read a single book in the past year. But the challenge for e-book services are people who like to read too much.

From Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less | WIRED


Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens

Thanks to technology, we’re reading more than ever—our brains process thousands of words via text messages, email, games, social media, and web stories. According to one report, the amount people that read tripled from 1980 to the late 2000s, and it’s probably safe to say that trend continues today. But as we jam more and more words into our heads, how we read those words has changed in a fundamental way: we’ve moved from paper to screens. It’s left many wondering what we’ve lost (or gained) in the shift, and a handful of scientists are trying to figure out the answer.

From Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens | Co.Design | business + design

Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’

On July 10, The Wall Street Journal will publish the first chapter of the book. An audio sample of the chapter, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Reese Witherspoon, will also be available.

From Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’ - Speakeasy - WSJ



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