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Cites & Insights 13:12 (December 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:12 (December 2013) is now available for download at http://citesandinsights.info/civ13i12.pdf.

The issue is 34 pages long.

The single-column 6" x 9" "online version," optimized for faster download and online or tablet reading, is also available--http://citesandinsights.info/civ13i12on.pdf

The issue contains one essay:
Words: The Ebook Marketplace, Part 2 pp. 1-34

More on the last few years in the ebook marketplace, this time focusing on ebook pricing, ebook and ereader sales, software, the past and future, (intentional) humor, rights--not so much DRM as ebook readers' rights, and a few miscellaneous pieces.

If you're waiting for "ebooks and pbooks" (note and, not versus)...that's coming in January 2014.

This completes Volume 13.

The indices will only be available as part of the print version of Volume 13, which will be announced when it's ready, probably some time within the next couple of weeks.

 

Odd graffiti

Graffiti on trains is common. Graffiti on trains commenting on the Internet? Not so common.

See: http://imgur.com/5UhogHi

River City Empire

River City Empire: Tom Dennison's Omaha
More than any other political boss of the early twentieth century, Thomas Dennison, “the Rogue who ruled Omaha,” was a master of the devious. Unlike his contemporaries outside the Midwest, he took no political office and was never convicted of a crime during his thirty-year reign. He was a man who managed saloons but never cared for alcohol; who may have incited the Omaha Race Riot of 1919 but claimed he never harmed a soul; who stood aside while powerful men did his bidding. His power came not from coercion or nobility but from delegation and subterfuge.

Orville D. Menard chronicles Dennison’s life in River City Empire, beginning with Dennison’s experiences in Colorado mining towns. In 1892 Dennison came to Omaha, Nebraska, where he married and started a family while solidifying his position as an influential political boss. Menard explores machine politics in Omaha as well as the man behind this machine, describing how Dennison steered elections, served the legitimate and illegitimate business communities, and administered justice boss-style to control crime and corruption. The microcosm of Omaha provides an opportunity for readers to explore bossism in a smaller environment and sheds light on the early twentieth-century American political climate as a whole.

Architecture at home in it's community

Buying into big-time college football: the 'System' behind the sport

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/crime/article3793618.ece

The Antiquarian Librarian This Week, October 20, 2013>

The following are the 10 most popular articles this week on the Antiquarian Librarian blog. Not every article is directly related to librarianship, but since librarians need to be in the know about everything, to relates in one way or another to our work.

What to Name the Washington Football Team? http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/what-to-name-washington-football-team.html This article came our of recent discussions about alternative names for the Redskins.

A Heart Shaped Like Texas: The Breakthrough List, October 11, 2013 http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/a-heart-shaped-like-texas-breakthrough.html This is my top 50 list in roots music for the week ending October 11, 2013.

CFBA Book Review: The Nurse's Secret Suitor by Cheryl Wyatt http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/cfba-book-review-nurses-secret-suitor.html This is a Christian fiction book review via Christian Fiction Blog Alliance.

World Series Trivial http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/world-series-trivial.html This post came out of some baseball research I did for one of our library's display makers.

The Most In Demand Employers on LinkedIn http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-most-in-demand-employers-on-linkedin... This post describes a LinkedIn page that tracks the businesses with the most job requests/ discussed.

Good Times: The Breakthrough List, October 18, 2013 http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/good-times-breakthrough-list-october-18.... This is the top 50 roots music list for the week ending October 18, 2013.

7 practical business storytelling tips http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/7-practical-business-storytelling-tips.html

Finalists for 2014 One Book One Nebraska Announced http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com/2013/10/finalists-for-2014-one-book-one.html -- Read More

Ohio Board of Education President Wants Toni Morrison Novel Scrubbed from State Common Core Materials

Ohio Board of Education President Debe Terhar wants all mentions of the Toni Morrison novel The Bluest Eye removed from state guidelines for schools teaching to the new Common Core academic standards. The novel tells the story of a young black girl living in Lorain, Ohio, who dreams of having blue eyes so that she will be as beautiful and beloved as white children.  

Read more on State Impact

Beloved Librarian Claims She Was Fired for Defending 9-Year-Old Contest Winner

Tyler Weaver receiving his reading contest award from beloved library aide, Lita Casey (Photo: Katie Weaver) It may be a quiet place, but the public library in Hudson Falls, New York (population: 6,927), is buzzing with drama these days, and the story has all the components of a good novel (albeit a novel set in a library, featuring librarians and a 9-year-old reading-contest winner as the main characters). That 9-year-old is Tyler Weaver — the self-proclaimed "king of the book club" and one of the library's most frequent visitors — who will be taking his book business elsewhere, now that a longtime library aide who stuck up for him in a contest controversy has been fired. Read more on Yahoo Shine

Banned Books Week September 22?28, 2013 : South Sioux City Public Library Plans Activities to Celebrate the Freedom to Read

The following is a press release that has been today, September 20th, 2013.

Banned Books Week September 22?28, 2013 : South Sioux City Public Library Plans Activities to Celebrate the Freedom to Read

The South Sioux City Public Library, 2121 Dakota Avenue, South Sioux City,Nebraska will celebrate Banned Books Week with the following activities.

A Banned Books Week Presentation will be held on Monday September 23rd at 6:30 p.m. Dave Mixdorf will discuss Banned Books Week, some of the books that have been challenged.

A Banned Books Week Read-Thon is scheduled for September 24th from 9am to 8pm. The read-a-thon is a public, silent testimony to our freedom to read. Volunteers sign up to read a banned book in the center of the library, in a comfortable arm chair or rocker, for 15-minute segments.

The American Library Association says of Banned Books Week:

The American Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. -- Read More

Violating Constitutional Separation of Powers is American Library Association's Latest Move for Net Neutrality

I have a problem when people feel the need to call for the violation of the US Constitution to advocate for net neutrality. I mean if it were so good, an honest argument would be used, no? See:

"Violating Constitutional Separation of Powers is American Library Association's Latest Move for Net Neutrality"

This is a library issue not seen before, to my knowledge. So I hope it adds to LISNews's diversity.

LIS Education Curriculum: More Emphais on Practice

In the LIS curriculum library visits are already included. A physical visit to leading four/five libraries once in two years will not give more real exposure. LIS curriculum should be such when students finish their study least each student have should visited all types of libraries with primary school, secondary school, higher secondary school, Pre College, Arts College, Commerce College, Science College, Management Library, Pharmacy College, Medical College, Nursing College, Ayurvedic College, Homeopathic College, Hospital Library, Engineering (civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, IT, electronic) Library, Architecture College, Public Library includes Village, District, State, National Library, University Library, various types of Institutional Library, Specialized Library with industries, Archival Library etc.

Initially in the first year students should visit as users in the second as professional. They should be good observer and LIS department can help them in identifying the checklist to be observed and studied when they visit various libraries. Some of the checklist could be before going to a library they should collect maximum information from the website about academic activity and library, ambience of a library, target audience, resources print and electronic. Print covers books, reference books, journals, magazines, newspapers, etc. Electronic resources cover e-journals, e-books, e-magazines, e-reports, DVD, etc. Information technology used by various libraries, and others such A to Z, federated search, new open source software. The most important part is resource knowledge, management and communication skills. -- Read More

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:10 (October 2013) is now available at http://citesandinsights.info

The issue is 48 pages long. The single-column 6x9 "online reading version" is 65 pages long.

In fact, most of the regular version also fits into a 6" width; it's made up of book samples that didn't reduce neatly to the narrow column of the two-column version.

The issue consists of one big essay in six smaller portions plus an introduction:

The Front: Books, Books and (Books?) pp. 1-48

It's all about books--specifically, Cites & Insights Books for libraries and librarians: What may be happening with older books, two important new books, one potential new book and two new combinations of old material.

Weeding the Virtual Bookstore pp. 2-3

Some of the existing Cites & Insights Books may go out of print (that is, be removed from potential production) shortly. This section explains why, which books are involved and why--if you actually want one of them--you need to act soon.

Your Library Is...: A Collection of Public Library Sayings pp. 3-10

An inspiring and interesting tour through what America's public libraries choose as their mottoes and slogans on their websites, based on a complete scan of all 9,000+ libraries (or at least those for which I could find websites). 1,137 unique mottoes and slogans, plus 88 mottoes and slogans shared by 205 libraries. General comments, price and availability (this one's available as an $8.99 PDF!) are followed by the Cs: Sayings from libraries in California, Colorado and Connecticut, roughly 9.5 of the 157 text pages in the book.

$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets, Vol. 1, Libraries by Size pp. 10-24 -- Read More

Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

Blog post from The Shatzkin Files: Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

http://www.idealog.com/blog/losing-bookstores-is-a-much-bigger-problem-for-publishers-than-i...

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

On sale on Amazon for $1.99

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) available

Cites & Insights 13:9 (September 2013) is now available for downloading at the Cites & Insights homepage.

The early, special issue is 10 pages long. If you're reading online or doing anything other than printing it out, you're much better off downloading the single-column online edition, which is 24 pages long, as most of the special issue is a rough draft of a book chapter that includes graphs and tables, which had to be compressed (reducing the type size in the tables quite a bit!) to fit into the narrower columns of the print version.

The issue consists of a single essay (albeit one that includes a draft book chapter as an example):

Libraries
$4 to $1: Public Library Benefits and Budgets--Help Needed pp. 1-10

I've started the followup to Give Us a Dollar and We'll Give You Back Four (2012-13), and I'm trying to crowdfund inexpensive or free versions of the book (and presell copies) through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

This issue describes the project: Two books (one with libraries by size, one with libraries by state) combining tables, graphs and commentary to offer reasonably detailed pictures of countable public library benefits for FY2011 and how they've changed from 2009 to 2011, and A Library Is..., a collection of public library slogans and mottoes. -- Read More

Cites & Insights 13:8 available

Cites & Insights 13:8 (August 2013) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/

The regular two-column print-oriented issue is 28 pages long; the online-oriented 6x9 single-column version is 54 pages long.

The issue includes:
Perspective: Differences pp. 1-7

Yes, Perspectives is back--this time with an essay about perception and value.

Social Networks pp. 7-21

A summer essay with relatively old material--mostly on Delicious, the early days of Google+, and the Great Pseudonymity Discussion.

Media: Mystery Collection Part 6 pp. 21-28

Discs 31-36 of this 60-disc 250-movie collection.

 

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