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Cites & Insights 14:11 (December 2014) available

The December 2014 Cites & Insights (14:11) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i11.pdf

This print-oriented two-column version is 34 pages long.

If you plan to read the issue online or on an ereader (tablet, notebook, etc.), you may prefer the single-column 6x9" version, available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i11on.pdf

The single-column version is 77 pages long, because the issue includes many tables, which aren't broken across columns or pages.

The issue consists of one essay, really the second part of a two-part essay (and you'll want to read the first part, in the October/November 2014 C&I or its one-column equivalent, first):

Intersections: Journals and "Journals": Taking a Deeper Look: Part 2: DOAJ Subset and Additional Notes

If you've been reading various commentaries about Gold OA journals--including Part 1--you may be wondering where all those supposed no-fee Gold OA journals are. This piece helps to tell that story. Specifically, of 2,843 journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals as of May 7, 2014 that have an English interface version, aren't from either OASPA members or Beall-list publishers, and are not about aspects of medicine or biology--and that actually published one or more articles between January 2011 and June 30, 2014--more than 78% do not charge fees of any sort, and those journals published 53% of the articles published by the whole group during that period. Those percentages grow to almost 92% and more than 81%, respectively, for 1,426 journals in the humanities and social sciences.

Cites & Insights 14:10 (October/November 2014) available

The October/November 2014 issue of Cites & Insights (14:10) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i10.pdf

This two-column print-oriented version is 24 pages long.

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age

One family’s quest to give Chinese orphans a happy home

After reaching their fifties and raising their own children, Jenny and Richard Bowen adopted 2-year-old Maya from China after learning of poor orphanage conditions for abandoned girls. Sixteen years later, the Bowens have two adopted daughters from the same region and have started a non-profit called Half the Sky to transform orphan care with the cooperation of the Chinese government.

Mark Twain: A Life

Mark Twain founded the American voice. His works are a living national treasury: taught, quoted, and reprinted more than those of any writer except Shakespeare. His awestruck contemporaries saw him as the representative figure of his times, and his influence has deeply flavoured the 20th and 21st centuries. Yet somehow, beneath the vast flowing river of literature that he left behind — books, sketches, speeches, not to mention the thousands of letters to his friends and his remarkable entries in private journals — the man who became Mark Twain, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, has receded from view.

It is hard to imagine a life that encompassed more of its times. Sam Clemens left his frontier boyhood in Missouri for a life on the Mississippi during the golden age of steamboats. He skirted the western theater of the Civil War before taking off for an uproariously drunken newspaper career in the Nevada of the Wild West. As his fame as a humorist and lecturer spread, witnessing the extremes of wealth and poverty of New York City and the Gilded Age (which he named). He travelled to Europe on the first American pleasure cruise and revitalized the prim genre of travel writing. He wooed and won his lifelong devoted wife, yet quietly pined for the girl who was his first crush and whom he would re-encounter many decades later. He invented and invested in get-rich-quick schemes. He became the toast of Europe and a celebrity who toured the globe. His comments on everything he saw, many published here for the first time, are priceless.

Correction to Cites & Insights 14:9

Cites & Insights 14:9 has been reissued with one correction on page 15, as discussed here: http://walt.lishost.org/2014/08/correction-in-cites-insights-149/

Cites & Insights 14:9 (September 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:9 (September 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i9.pdf

This two-column print-oriented version is 18 pages.

For those reading C&I online or on an ereader, the single-column 35-page 6x9" edition is available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i9on.pdf

This issue includes:

Packard Bell - Library History

In 1996 Packard Bell put out a commercial that tried to show urban existence as negative with the point of the commercial being that using a Packard Bell computer "You can do it all from home". Librarians objected to the negative image of the library. The commercial has storm trooper like characters marching around the library shushing people. Packard Bell changed the commercial and lifted out the library scenes. The version here shows the library scene.

Cowabunga! ‘Ninja Turtles’ in training sweep into Sioux City bookstore

SIOUX CITY | During one of their weekly outings, DeeDee Johnson spent the afternoon with her 6-year-old grandson fostering his fascination with four fictional crime-fighting brothers and books. Devin Riley became a certified Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle in training at Barnes & Noble Booksellers on Wednesday. Though the boy likes Leonardo the most, the blue-masked leader hardly compares to his sensei – his grandma.

Cites & Insights 14:8 (August 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:8 (August 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i8.pdf

The two-column print-oriented issue is 32 pages long. A single-column 6x9" version designed for online/tablet reading is also available, at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i8on.pdf (The single-column version is 61 pages long.)

This issue includes the following:

The Front: Once More with [Big] Dealing pp. 1-2

If you read the June 2014 issue, you may be aware that "Big-Deal Serial Purchasing: Tracking the Damage" wasn't available when I thought it would be.

It's available now; this brief essay offers the link to the ALA Store page for the Library Technology Reports issue and notes the complementary book for those academic librarians with deeper interests.

I believe every academic library should pay attention to this issue of LTR. If your library subscribes, it should be available now (electronically) or in a few days (in print form). If it doesn't, you should buy the issue as a separate. Some of you really would find Beyond the Damage: Circulation, Coverage and Staffing useful as well.

Words: Doing It Yourself pp. 2-18

Notes on self-publishing and whether or not it makes sense for you (or for your library to assist with).

Intersections: Access and Ethics 3 pp. 18-32

Touring Buffalo's Urban Blight

The Writing's On the Wall

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

The pioneering young scientist whose work on the structure of small worlds has triggered an avalanche of interest in networks.

Cites & Insights 14:7 (July 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:7 (July 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i7.pdf

That URL is for the traditional two-column print-oriented ejournal. If you plan to read the journal on a computer, a tablet or other e-device (and if you plan to follow links), you're much better off--especially in this case--downloading the single-column online-oriented version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i7on.pdf

[Links may not work from the two-column version. Conversely, some boldface may not show up in the one-column version. This issue has two dozen tables, some of which have smaller type in the two-column version, making the one-column version easier to read.]

The two-column version is 24 pages long. The single-column 6x9 version is 45 pages long.

The issue consists of a single essay, all original material (except for a few excerpts from publisher pages):

Intersections
Journals, "Journals" and Wannabes: Investigating the List (pp. 1-24)

Jeffrey Beall's 4P (potential, probable, possible predatory) publisher and journal lists total 9,219 journals in early April 2014.

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) totals 9.822 journals as of early June 2014.

9,219 is 93.9% of 9,822.

But: 90.8% of the journals in DOAJ are not represented in Beall's lists.

A paradox? Not really.

Cites & Insights 14:6 (June 2014) available

Cites & Insights 14:6 (June 2014) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i6.pdf

The print-oriented two-column version is 16 pages long. You may also view or download a 32-page one-column 6x9" ereader-oriented version at http://citesandinsights.info/civ14i6on.pdf

This issue includes three sections:
The Front: Beyond the Damage (pp. 1-4)

Libraries that subscribe to Library Technology Reports should, some time in the next few days or weeks, receive "Big-Deal Serial Purchasing: Tracking the Damage"--and academic libraries that don't subscribe to LTR may want to purchase this edition from ALA Editions. It brings last year's The Big Deal and the Damage Done forward to cover 2002-2012 and offers a tighter and more sophisticated view of the situation. (Spoiler alert: Things got worse from 2010 to 2012)

Simultaneously, I'm publishing Beyond the Damage: Circulation, Coverage and Staffing, a book looking at some other aspects of academic libraries and how they changed between 2002 and 2012. It's available in two forms, each $45: a 130-page paperback with color graphs--or a site-licensed PDF ebook with precisely the same content. Easiest way to find it: go to Lulu.com and search "Crawford beyond damage" (no quotes needed)--that currently yields just the two versions.

Media: Mystery Collection, part 7 (pp. 4-12)

For the first time, most of these movies are in color--which doesn't necessarily mean they're better, as this is also (I believe) the first time I've given up on movies before they're finished in five out of 24 cases. There are some gems, but also some real dross here.

Library memes



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