Bibliofuture's blog

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story
http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2014/03/18/290236647/an-imaginary-town-becomes-real-then-n...

In the encyclopedia world an entry like that is called a Mountweazel

See New Yorker article about Mountweazel:
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/08/29/050829ta_talk_alford

Youtube entry discussing Mounweazel entry:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjRdhVlw354

The Odd Clauses

The Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution Through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions
If the United States Constitution were a zoo, and the First, Fourth, and Fourteenth amendments were a lion, a giraffe, and a panda bear, respectively, then The Odd Clauses would be a special exhibit of shrews, wombats, and bat-eared foxes. Past the ever-popular monkey house and lion cages, Boston University law professor Jay Wexler leads us on a tour of the lesser-known clauses of the Constitution, the clauses that, like the yeti crab or platypus, rarely draw the big audiences but are worth a closer look. Just as ecologists remind us that even a weird little creature like a shrew can make all the difference between a healthy environment and an unhealthy one, understanding the odd clauses offers readers a healthier appreciation for our constitutional system. With Wexler as your expert guide through this jurisprudence jungle, you’ll see the Constitution like you’ve never seen it before. -- Read More

National Reading Month

As part of National Reading Month Amazon is reducing the price of several books that they label "Books that inspired our passion to read"

Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales ($1.99)

Some of the other titles:

American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition ($1.99)

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe: The Chronicles of Narnia ($1.99)

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ($1.99)

Sarah, Plain and Tall ($1.99)

When Beauty Tamed the Beast ($1.99)

Right to Farm Statutes and the Changing State of Modern Agriculture

Right to Farm Statutes and the Changing State of Modern Agriculture
http://goo.gl/MPa5Z9

Authors@Google

Authors@Google: Gary Taubes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6vpFV6Wkl4

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy

Dog Sniffs, Technology, and the Mythical Constitutional Right to Criminal Privacy
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2391404

Why a conservative economist moved to the country

PBS NewsHour piece

Economics correspondent Paul Solman profiles Chris Martenson, a former science professional who gave up his large home and high-status job for life in rural Massachusetts. From there he began expressing his deep dissatisfaction with the way the U.S. economy works and garnered a growing following on his website, Peak Prosperity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPTDYD3K-Ks

Amazon might lose interest in total hegemony over the book business before they achieve it

Indie Bookstores Don't Take Kindly To Amazon's Kindle Offer

Distorted Mirror of Wikipedia

Standing Bear Talk

SCSU Library Grad Program Loses ALA Accreditation

Odd graffiti

Graffiti on trains is common. Graffiti on trains commenting on the Internet? Not so common.

See: http://imgur.com/5UhogHi

River City Empire

River City Empire: Tom Dennison's Omaha
More than any other political boss of the early twentieth century, Thomas Dennison, “the Rogue who ruled Omaha,” was a master of the devious. Unlike his contemporaries outside the Midwest, he took no political office and was never convicted of a crime during his thirty-year reign. He was a man who managed saloons but never cared for alcohol; who may have incited the Omaha Race Riot of 1919 but claimed he never harmed a soul; who stood aside while powerful men did his bidding. His power came not from coercion or nobility but from delegation and subterfuge.

Orville D. Menard chronicles Dennison’s life in River City Empire, beginning with Dennison’s experiences in Colorado mining towns. In 1892 Dennison came to Omaha, Nebraska, where he married and started a family while solidifying his position as an influential political boss. Menard explores machine politics in Omaha as well as the man behind this machine, describing how Dennison steered elections, served the legitimate and illegitimate business communities, and administered justice boss-style to control crime and corruption. The microcosm of Omaha provides an opportunity for readers to explore bossism in a smaller environment and sheds light on the early twentieth-century American political climate as a whole.

Architecture at home in it's community

Buying into big-time college football: the 'System' behind the sport

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/crime/article3793618.ece

Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

Blog post from The Shatzkin Files: Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

http://www.idealog.com/blog/losing-bookstores-is-a-much-bigger-problem-for-publishers-than-i...

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

On sale on Amazon for $1.99

The smile of a lonely realist

Sometimes a book is worthwhile for one good line in the book.
This line from the book "Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban" made the entire book worthwhile to me.

-----------------------

The man smiled with exaggerated patience. It was the smile of a lonely realist stranded in the society of cloud-cuckoos.

Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban (page 19)

Syndicate content