Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

The Napster Public Library

Submitted by Steven on Fri, 03/02/2001 - 09:51

The Chicago Tribune has this piece on the difference between Napster and the public library.
\"A library checks books out one at a time, and while one is reading the book, it is not available to others. It does not distribute thousands of copies at once.

A library does not let you keep the book. It sets terms and limits on how long you can keep it, and fines you if you are late in returning it.\"

Information Liberation

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/03/2001 - 08:57

Information liberation : Challenging the corruptions of information power by Brian Martin is now online as an eText, Here, links to the chapters are below.I\'ve only read 2 chapters, but it looks interesting.
\"
Power tends to corrupt, and information power is no exception. Information Liberation analyses the corruptions of power in a range of crucial current areas in the information society, including mass media, intellectual property, surveillance, bureaucracies, defamation and research.

Reform solutions seldom get to the root of information problems. Information Liberation examines radical alternatives that undermine the power of vested interests. Alternatives include replacing mass media with network media, abolishing intellectual property, and changing social institutions that create a demand for surveillance. The book canvasses various strategies for moving toward these alternatives, focussing on grassroots action.

Information Liberation is provocative. Most readers will find something to disagree with. That\'s all part of the process. Everyone needs to be involved in discussing information policies and practices, rather than leaving the issues to experts and vested interests.\"

License to Link

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 12/28/2000 - 13:59

Brian writes \"http://www.wired.com/news/business/0,1367,40850,00.html
Wired News has a story about news sites charging fees for the right to link to articles.
\"
This is a funny story, apparently iCopyright.com thinks they have the ability to get $50 from people who link to sites they \"protect\". One of those sites, The Albuquerque Journal, when asked about the $50, says -
\"I don\'t know. We certainly wouldn\'t go after you. We link to other sites. We encourage people to link to us.\"

Stealth Plan Puts Copy Protection into every Drive

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 12/27/2000 - 10:45

Kell Yusuf writes \"Those who wish to make us pay for Web content will LOVE this article: It\'s about plans for copy-protecting your next computer - these drives are incompatible with ordinary dives, so you would not be able copy files from the protected drive to the non-protected drive. \"Hastening a rapid demise for the free copying of digital media, the next generation of hard disks is likely to come with copyright protection countermeasures built in...\" \"
The Register UK has a series of articles.

BT files hyperlink patent suit against Prodigy

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 12/21/2000 - 11:06

Brian sent in This One at The Standard on British Telecom\'s idiotitic legal moves to get money from ISP\'s.

After discovering, in a routine check, that it owned the patent for the hyperlink, BT wrote to 17 U.S. ISPs, asking them to pay for the privilege of using the technology through licensing agreements. Nerver mind that someone did it Way Back in the 60\'s in CA.

InfoEthics 2000 Conference Papers

Submitted by AnnaKh on Tue, 11/21/2000 - 18:58

UNESCO just had its INFOETHICS 2000 conference in Paris, the Third UNESCO Congress on Ethical, Legal and Social Challenges of Cyberspace. A number of papers are available from the conference, some in English. They are available here. The list of papers is as follows:

The information society and the expectation revolution
by David Konzevik

The changing shape of information and the role of government
by Thomas B. Riley

Public sector information initiatives in the European Union
by George Papapavlou

Access to information and \"public domain\" in the post-\"perestroyka\" Russia: a paradoxal experience.
by Ekaterina U.Genieva

Access to telecommunications in the internet age
Arthur Levin

Accessibility to rural and remote areas
by Yasuhiko Kawasumi

Networks and information services: government policy
by Jean-Noël Tronc

Fair use and access to information in the digital era
by Carlos M. Correa

Copyright and its limitations in the digital environment
by Bernt Hugenholtz

How Can Fair Use Doctrine Be Applied For the Appropriate Level of Copyright Protection in the Global Marketplace?
by Euisun Yoo

Preserving fair use in the digital age
by Barry Steinhardt

Copyright and the freedom of accessing information in the cyberspace
by Andras Szinger

Ten commandments to protect privacy in the Internet world
by Hansjuergen Garstka

The legal protection of the right of privacy on the networks
by Amr Zaki Abdel Motaal

The future of privacy : David and Goliath revisited
by Simon Davis

Human dignity in the cyberspace society
by Adama Fofana

Interception capabilities 2000
by Duncan Campbell

Once again, the papers are at http://webworld.unesco.org/infoethics2000/papers.html.