Libraries

Libraries

Library\'s air taking toll on staffers

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has this article on a library that is making people sick.\"So far this year, 10 of the library\'s 35 staff members have missed a combined 225 work hours because of air-quality related health problems, Enerson said. Among them is Susan Skaggs, who wears a filtered breathing mask to work and maintains a \"Sick Building Log\" with entries from November 1998 through February 1999\"

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LivePerson: Keeping Reference Alive and Clicking

I just finished reading the article by Thomas regarding the small hardware store and talking to a real librarian, and it reminded me of an article that appeared in E-Content about live reference service via chat, using Live Person.
\"To increase users\' communication options, Lippincott Library added online chat to its reference service in September 1999. Now, in addition to contacting Lippincott by phone, email, fax, or (dare we suggest it) coming to the Library in person, students, faculty, and staff can ask questions through chat and get an immediate response.\"

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Real hardware store, real library?

I was busy Saturday, so my wife went to the hardware store for me. She was going to get this special wrench I needed but couldn\'t name, so I described it for her. She went to one of those mega stores, you know, a Barnes and Noble for tools. She came back and said, they didn\'t have the wrench I wanted- or at least the kid who tried to help didn\'t think so. She guessed that I would have to go to a REAL HARDWARE STORE. Unfortunately the REAL Hardware Store in our neighborhood closed down and the only other one in town is all the way across town.

A real hardware store has more than just tools and hardware, of course. It is a source of expertise and advice on all those household projects that we weekend warriors attempt. They don\'t have unknowledgeble clerks with Metallica t-shirts that know more about MP-3s than socket sets. They have people who can help you with getting that plumbing project right or finding the right size carriage bolt. That type of hardware store seems to be quickly fading as the mega stores take over and few will mind when they get amazonned, I would guess.

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Ask Not for Whom the Bell Tolls

Halifax County and Bedford, Nova Scotia basically cut out librarians all together from the junior high libraries. They wiped out about 200 positions total, including five circuit teacher-librarian positions and 35 library assistants. James B. Casey had some good thoughts and questions on this issue. He wrote:


School Librarians everywhere should take heed. And so should Public,
Academic and Special Librarians. If the Public Education Establishment
can marginalize, minimize and neutralize their own commitment to provide

Library Service in support of K-8 Education, who will pick up the tab?
Who will be unscathed?

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Global Library Grovels for Books

Deseret News has this article about a new library in Egypt that has it all....except books.
\"Surrounded by a reflecting waterpool, the library has 17 elevators, self-cleaning windows and a safety system so advanced it can extinguish fires without leaving so much as a drop of water on a rare text.
The library is short on one crucial element. Books.\"

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Killer Fonts from libraries

There is a new web site where people can order fonts based on the handwritings of serial killers. The person who runs the site says he got the fonts from libraries. See the article from conoe.ca
\"Mahaffy said the site, www.killerfonts.com, is glorifying murderers such as Charles Manson, cannibal Jeffrey Dahmer, assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, Gainesville Ripper Danny Rolling and Sirhan Sirhan.

\"This is morbid and an insult to victims worldwide,\" she said.

The site, based in Los Angeles, claims to have gleaned the signatures from libraries, court materials and public documents.\"

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Gates donation more than doubles northern library budget

Excite News has a report on a huge donation to the Northwest Territories\' library system. Gates more than doubled the Northwest Territories\' entire budget for public libraries. The N.W.T.\'s total yearly budget for libraries is about $250,000 and he donated over $323,000. Still a small budget, but that\'ll get\'m a few new computers, eh?

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Bad Book Donation

AZ Central has an Almost comical Story on a huge donation of worthless books.

\"What would happen if someone donated 15,000 books to Gilbert\'s library and nearly all of them had the same title?

Librarians are finding out the hard way this week as they sort through a loading dock full of books that arrived as part of a Cracker Barrel restaurants promotion. \"

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Design errors, cost overrruns delay opening

This Story from Florida shows that planning is the second most important thing when building a new library.

\"The research and cultural heritage center was expected to open by early 2001 but will not do so until as late as March 2002. Construction has been pushed back as county officials grapple with the potential of $2.5 million in cost overruns because of problems with the design of the library. \"

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Is it check-out time for libraries?

Now Magazine in Toronto has a Story on how libraries are dying due to increased pressure from book stores and coffee shops.

\"As circulation figures slide at Toronto\'s 98 library branches, critics complain that they\'re stuffy, outmoded and insensitive to T.O.\'s multicultural makeup. And now, far-seeing supporters of publicly supported reading are calling for big changes. \"

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Promoting the Library by E-Mail Alert Service

Shar
on Giles
writes:My colleague Jon Crossno
and I have recently published an article on our Library\'s
email alert service (University of Texas Southwestern
Medical Center at Dallas.) It\'s a weekly service that
alerts our users to new Library resouces and
biomedical sites and news on the Web. It\'s not just a
rehash of our printed newsletter.
\"Promoting the Library by E-Mail Alert Service\" was
published in the April/May 2000 issue of MLS: Marketing
Library Services, pgs.4-6. It\'s also online at Infotoday.com

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Library lends a visual effect to the landscape

Ron Force suggested
The Seattle Times has a neat Story on the use of library green space as a sculpture garden.

\"New experiences are possible on a walk through the Kirkland Library, where the latest art exhibition, \"Sculptural Discoveries,\" took three years to assemble.

The works, all of which are from Sun Valley, are in Kirkland because of the community\'s desire to make something more significant out of a patch of grass on the roof of the library parking garage.

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LOC to not digitize its book collection?

Kip DeGraaf writes \"James Billington, the Librarian of Congress gave a speech to the National Press Club (transcript available at http://www.loc.gov/today/transcripts/041400-npc.html on April 14th about the role of the LOC in the Information Age.

http://www.techlawjournal.com/educ/20000415.htm contains some tidbits from the question and answer session conducted after his address. \"

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Public libraries learning to promote themselves

The Nando Times has yet another great library Story.This one on how in the past few years, libraries have become more aggressive about promoting themselves.

With publishers ever-nervous about the future of reading, libraries offer a large, dependable market. According to the most recent statistics available from the Book Industry Study Group, public libraries bought close to $700 million worth of books in 1997 and are projected to spend almost $900 million by 2002. And because libraries have a mission to buy books that are useful, and not just popular, they accept titles mainstream stores avoid.

\"Publishers depend on libraries for midlist titles,\" said Marcia Purcell, director of Random House\'s department of library promotion. \"The same is true with first-time novelists. Some bookstores are reluctant to take a chance on a first novel. Libraries are willing.\"

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Happy 200th to the LOC

The Nando Times has a nice look at the Library of Congress, in Washington, D.C.

\"On April 24, 1800, President John Adams approved an appropriation of $5,000 to purchase \"such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress.\"

Books - mostly on history, economics and law - were ordered from London. They arrived in 1801 and were shelved in the new U.S. Capitol. The collection consisted of just 740 volumes and three maps.

Next week, on April 24, millions of books and much history later, the Library of Congress celebrates its 200th anniversary as an institution that grew, in the words of one of its biographers, into \"a symbol of American democracy and faith in the power of learning.\"

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Libraries boom despite the Web

Finally a Story that admits the web is not going to shut down libraries.

\"It soon became clear that libraries are far from the tar pit - that, in fact, as both Reid and Keith Lance, director of Library Research Services for the Colorado State Library, noted: This idea so many people have, about libraries declining in the age of the Internet, is just wrong. Libraries, in fact, recognized the competition that technology presented and have offered it themselves.

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Net Library -Nyet

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes:


Only those of a certain age argue about whether it was Pogo or the Alligator that said: Younger demographic groups just look it up on the web. :-)


What a difference a few months can make in the looking glass world of e-texts! Five months ago, I lamenated that NetLibrary (tm) was marketing to gen-exers not boomers like myself. But now NetLibrary has cut off both exers as individuals and me at the virtual knees! And, it appears, librarians like myself must share the blame.

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LOC Commemorative Stamp

The Citizens\' Stamp Advisory Committee, a group of independent citizens appointed by the Postmaster General to review more than 40,000 suggestions for stamp subjects received by the United States Postal Service each year, recommended a commemorative stamp for issuance on the Library\'s Bicentennial date, April 24, 2000. Ethel Kessler, the designer of the breast cancer stamp issued on July 29, 1998 by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Postmaster General William Henderson, has designed the Library\'s Bicentennial commemorative stamp, as pictured here on the Library of Congress Website

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1,000 Years at British Library

The AP Wire is carrying this story;

A 1,000-year-old book of riddles, a 15th-century love letter and a 20th-century bear named Pooh: All are strands in the rich history of English literature being celebrated this summer by the British Library.

This body of literature is ``the thing, above anything else, that Britain has given to the world in the course of the last millennium,\'\' government arts secretary Chris Smith says about the national library\'s major exhibit for the year 2000.

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Rewriting the book on library funding

A special commission here in NY is calling for a rethinking of the way libraries across the state are paid for. New York should contribute far more state funds to local libraries and base the allocation on need, according to the Regents Commission on Library Services, which for the last 18 months has been looking at ways of improving the state\'s vast library system. Read the story at The Times Union, Albany.

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