Literacy

Literacy

Literature is not Data: Against Digital Humanities

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 11/02/2012 - 01:14
Topic

BIG DATA IS COMING for your books. It’s already come for everything else. All human endeavor has by now generated its own monadic mass of data, and through these vast accumulations of ciphers the robots now endlessly scour for significance much the way cockroaches scour for nutrition in the enormous bat dung piles hiding in Bornean caves. The recent Automate This, a smart book with a stupid title, offers a fascinatingly general look at the new algorithmic culture: 60 percent of trades on the stock market today take place with virtually no human oversight.

Breaking Up the Echo

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Tue, 09/18/2012 - 10:23
Topic

Information literacy

Opinion piece in the NYT that has elements on information literacy.

Excerpt: People assimilate new information in a selective fashion. When people get information that supports what they initially thought, they give it considerable weight. When they get information that undermines their initial beliefs, they tend to dismiss it.

Full piece here

Students Say They've Been Denied The Right To Read

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Fri, 09/07/2012 - 00:21
Topic

Eight Detroit-area public school students returning to classes this week are plaintiffs against a school system they say has failed them.

Their families and the American Civil Liberties Union say that the Highland Park school system has denied the students the right to learn to read, and that the state has a responsibility to fix that.

Michelle Johnson has five children in Highland Park schools. Her daughter is heading into the 12th grade, but can read at only about the fourth-grade level.

Surprising Tips That Help Kids Learn to Read

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sun, 06/10/2012 - 21:07
Topic

“Print knowledge” is an awareness of the mechanics of the reading process, like the fact that English is read from left to right and that written words map on to spoken ones. Adults often take this knowledge for granted, but research demonstrates that children benefit when these aspects of print are explicitly pointed out.

Why does James Patterson care about our kids’ reading habits?

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 04/30/2012 - 15:12

Why does James Patterson care about our kids’ reading habits?
At this point, rowdy adolescents clutch their free copies of Patterson’s young adult novel Maximum Ride and listen intently as he gives a prescription for success in writing, or, beyond that, life.

"You have to have a dream; you have to have passion. And I strongly recommend you have a back-up dream. You have to have focus. Outline, baby. Before you write anything, outline."