Literacy

Literacy

Does reading actually change the brain?

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 12/27/2013 - 10:01
Topic

Does reading actually change the brain?
http://www.futurity.org/reading-novels-leaves-shadow-activity-brain/
"The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," says Gregory Berns. "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense. Now we're seeing that something may also be happening biologically."

Adding Up The Cost Of Low Literacy Among Adults

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 11/04/2013 - 14:56
Topic

Low literacy rates for adults can have wide-ranging effects on those around them. They may rely more heavily on government services; their children may not get that extra hand with schoolwork; their families may not get sufficient financial support.

But for the millions of adults with low literacy, the ability to read, write and speak English might offer them the most important opportunity of all: a chance to emerge from the shadows and participate as equals in society.

Americans Score Poorly in Numeracy, Literacy and Computer Skills

Submitted by birdie on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 13:38
Topic

Are reality shows turning our brains to mush?

The Washington Post reports: Policymakers and politicians who wring their hands about the mediocre performance of U.S. students on international math and reading tests have another worry: The nation’s grown-ups aren’t doing much better.

Want To Read Others' Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Sat, 10/05/2013 - 03:04
Topic

Your ability to "read" the thoughts and feelings of others could be affected by the kind of fiction you read.

That's the conclusion of a study in the journal Science that gave tests of social perception to people who were randomly assigned to read excerpts from literary fiction, popular fiction or nonfiction.

Full article

The New Explosion in Audio Books: How They Re-emerged as a Rare Bright Spot in the Publishing Business

Submitted by Lee Hadden on Fri, 08/02/2013 - 12:06
Topic

Wall Street Journal, August 2, 2013.

Mr. Hewson has discovered that writing for audio requires different techniques from prose writing. Word repetition becomes glaringly obvious. So do unintentional rhymes. Location changes have to be telegraphed at the beginning of the scene, so that listeners aren't confused.

"Complex sentences, long subordinate clauses—they don't work, people get bored and confused by them," he says. "You're looking for the writing to disappear so that all people hear is the story."