School Libraries

School Libraries

Libraries evolve with info age

Newsobserver.com has a nice Story on the school library of the year 2000. Most of it won\'t be news to you (did you know the school personnel once known as librarians prefer to be called \"media specialists\" now?), but it is still a nice look at how things are going in some school libraries.

\"The more resources you have, the farther you can get beyond the school walls and the more relevant an education will be,\" Bradburn said. \"At the the low end we have schools that have very little technology, maybe just one computer with Internet access.\"

Gifted kids and librarians

Brian writes \"A short Interview with author Judy Galbraith about the relationship between gifted students and school librarians, from Foreword magazine:

\"

Question: It makes sense that school librarians would be a gifted student\'s natural ally. Have you found this to be the case?
Her Answer Follows...

If it\'s for the children it must be good

Brian writes \"Often-clueless columnist Bob Greene of the Chicago Tribune is encouraging people to donate their used books to needy libraries in Chicago Public Schools. I have a feeling this will end badly, with the school system deluged with unusable crap.

Chicagotribune.com has the Story

\"

You want Fries with that Shake(speare)?

The New York Times has this neat article on a plan to combine all the software in schools into one database. The program is entitled Schools Interoperability Framework and involves more than 80 software companies (Mr. Gates and all).\"The new standards, which were developed by the software companies and educators, will allow schools to link together the separate programs that run various functions, including the library\'s checkout system, the school\'s front office, and the cafeteria and transportation systems.\"

Students clicking on to knowledge

Steven J. Bell sent in this Story from Daily
News Los Angeles.com
that talks about how
libraries
are adding more computers and other fancy, shiny,
beeping things.

\"We call it the cybrary, instead of
the library,\" said Susan Newcomer, library media
teacher at Glendale\'s Clark Magnet High School where
students can roam the World Wide Web, view
CD-ROMs and search an online catalog for books

Another Heart Warming Story

SF Gate had this article about a fire that damaged parts of a school, and the residents of the community that built it back up.
\"Three years ago, a fire ripped through the school, severely damaging a wing of classrooms and its library, destroying every book on every shelf. But thanks to much- needed donations from Peninsula schools and residents -- including one who took the school\'s principal Lorna Manning on a $2,200 book shopping spree -- the shelves in the soon-to-be re-opened library are beginning to fill up.\"

NJ School Libraries Falling Behind

It\'s sad how often this same Story pops up
here on LISNews. This time NJ.com tells us how
crappy the Trenton School Libraries are
doing.

\"Some books on space travel in the city
school libraries pre-date the 1969 historic Apollo 11
mission by a decade, More than half of the schools lack
certified librarians, and those who run the so-called
learning centers have been hesitant to get rid of
outdated books.\"

Last time I think this
same story came from Philly.

Cardinal Directional Rule of the Library

The Chicago Sun Times has an Almost funny Story on some unfair seating troubles at The Wheeling High School Library. The librarians are really cracking down, and some of the students are none to happy.

\"It\'s ridiculous,\" said Chris Schiel, 17, of Wheeling, who\'s on Wheeling\'s track and cross-country teams. \"I\'ve been kicked out for discussing that day\'s classwork.\" Student athletes who are allowed to study in the library instead of attending gym class are required to sit facing south, in the direction of the circulation desk.

Reading for fun might be a lost art

A Story from Starnews.com
pines about the good old days, when teenagers read
for fun, and swiped what they wanted from the library.
An interesting take on how the internet is influencing
school libraries.

\"That\'s because teen-agers no
longer are reading for fun. In libraries, computer labs
and at home, most youths today are more apt to spend
an hour chatting with friends on the Internet than spend
an hour reading a good book.\"

Librarian/Media Generalist gets kids to read

Fosters Online has this article about how a school librarian gets kids to read books. Another issue that is brought up is her title change.
\"When Diana Greenleaf started her job at the New Durham School 15 years ago, she was known as a librarian and was responsible for scheduling classes to use the library.

Today she’s known as a \"media generalist\" and is involved in everything from helping teachers design curriculum, teaching research skills, having story time and challenging students to read books.\"

Dated Books Make Time Stand Still

The Washington Times has this story on outdated school libraries.
\"Browse a typical school library and you\'ll learn that humans haven\'t yet set foot on the moon and \"stewardesses\" must quit working when they get married.
Although the latest research indicates that a well-stocked and well-staffed school library actually boosts students\' scores on standardized tests, many school libraries contain books that are outdated by decades and often filled with offensive stereotypes.\"

Principal yanks \'Underpants\' from Library

Pioneer Planet has this article about an elementary school principal in Connecticut who has taken the book \"Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants\" off the school library shelves.
\"Not even the children\'s book superhero ``Captain Underpants\'\' could win a battle against the Naugatuck, Conn., school district.
Officials of the Maple Hill elementary school have yanked Dav Pilkey\'s latest book, ``Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants,\'\' out of its library, saying that its humor is tasteless and that the book has caused students to be disruptive. While anti-censorship groups say they have not heard of other bans of Pilkey\'s books, they say they regularly receive complaints about children\'s books for taste and other reasons.\"

Libraries are good for you!!

This release from the U.S. Newswire talks about new studies that reveal that school libraries have beneficial effects on students\' performances in school. If this is so, then why don\'t they get the funding from the government that they deserve?
\"Want to raise students\'
test scores? Three new studies -- from Pennsylvania, Alaska,
and Colorado -- confirm that the secret to boosting students\'
academic performance is right down the hall in the school library.

But will school libraries get their just rewards as the Senate
begins debating the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)
today?

School libraries last received dedicated federal dollars in the
1960s. Today, the average U.S. school library gets $6 per pupil
per year from federal block grants.

\"That pays for less than half a book,\" notes Emily Sheketoff,
executive director of the American Library Association\'s Washington
office. \"If a dot com could show the results school libraries
do, its stock price would soar.\"

School Libraries improve reading tests

The Rocky Mountain News has a Story on a study that showed libraries help children score 10 percent to 18 percent higher on reading tests.

\"Further, collaboration between library media specialists and classroom teachers on instruction is key to boosting reading skills, according to the study done by the Library Research Service of the state Department of Education.\"


Check out LRS.org, they have an executive summary PDF available.

Technology changes role of school library

The News Press in Florida, has a
great look at school libraries.

“On the Internet, you can just type it in and it will
find it for you,” Congregane said. “You can do it right at
home, you don’t have to go out to the library to get
information.”

Educators have mixed opinions about how the Internet
and other technology are used in schools.

Overall, what the Internet means is that the role of the
school library has changed. \"

Columbine being rebuilt

A couple of stories are running in the Denverpost on the Columbine High School Library.


Story 1Construction is set to start May 29 on the new Columbine High library, with many of the contractors - including those working on the new Denver Broncos stadium - donating their services to help offset the $3.1 million cost.


Story 2A group of average people has organized a not-so-average event to help raise some of the $3.1 million needed to build a new library for Columbine High School.


Donations can be sent to HOPE Columbine Atrium and Library Fund, c/o The Denver Foundation, P.O. Box 24035, Denver 80224. Make checks payable to HOPE.

Senator Fighting for school libraries

US Senator Jack Reed has introduced a bill to provide $275
million in funding to school libraries to purchase new
reference materials. S.1262, the Elementary and Secondary
School Library Media Resources, Training and Advanced
Technology Assistance Act, would provide critical funding
for school libraries and increase student access to the most
up-to-date library materials. You can even submit
examples of out-of-date reference books in your school
library Here.
The School Library Bill Page is at reed.senate.gov

Rise in Test Scores Tied to School Library Resources

Edweek.org has a report on an interesting study done that has shown a correlation between appropriate and sufficient library collections and qualified library personnel an performance on standardized tests.

\"

The reports conclude that test scores increase as school librarians spend more time collaborating with and providing training to teachers, providing input into curricula, and managing information technology for the school.

The full results will be reported in next month\'s School Library Journal.\'

Tea-riffic fundraiser

This
Story
out of NJ shows that fundraising opportunites
present themselves at any time. A teacher came up with an
idea for a new tea, and has since been selling the tea, and
making money for the library.

\"Since launching the Teaneck Tea Collection in 1993
with the help of Harney & Sons Ltd., a New England tea
company, Ponchick has raised $2,970.24 in profits from sales
of Teaneck Tea and poured that cash right back into
Whittier\'s library. The tea is on sale at Whittier School
and at Victoria\'s Cafe on Queen Anne Road ($5 for 24
bags)

Librarian uses puppets as a teaching tool

Anonymous Patron writes "Here's A Good PR Lesson from a small town paper in the UP of MI. Puppets are helping Lakeview School third graders improve their reading skills.

Lakeview librarian Gina Sorensen, who came up with the puppet project, has assigned six groups of third graders to work together to put on a puppet show. Each show is based on various "fractured" fairy tales. The scripted puppet shows are derived from the classic fairy tales, but a twist has been added to each story.
Includes exciting action photo!"

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