News

News

Ten Stories That Shaped 2009

It's time to take another look back at the notable headlines of the past year.

"You lie!'" on Yale Librarian's List of Year's Memorable Quotes

Fred Shapiro, associate librarian and lecturer in legal research at Yale Law School, is releasing his fourth annual list of The Yale Book of Quotations. His top quote: "Keep your government hands off my Medicare," by a speaker at a town hall meeting in South Carolina in July. "You lie!" was spoken by Rep. Joe Wilson, R-SC and was directed at President Obama during a joint session of Congress on the subject of health care.

Other pearls of wisdom from Sarah Palin, Falcon Heene, Kanye West, Gov. Mark Sanford and Sully Sullenberger can be found in the AP story.

PW’s “Afro Picks” Controversy

PW’s provocative cover image and title for its annual African American feature stirred up plenty of controversy on Twitter and blogs yesterday – and now the book blogs at the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune are asking their readers to weigh in.

African American novelists Carleen Brice and Virginia DeBerry and Donna Grant were among the first to criticize the cover for presenting the work of black authors in the context of a negative stereotype. PW editor Calvin Reid explained that he’d chosen the cover image from the book Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present, edited by Deborah Willis. “While it never occurred to me that anyone would be offended by these images, I was very wrong and I have to acknowledge that,” he wrote.

Full piece at EarlyWord.com

Topic: 

Delaware to add new libraries to statewide catalog

In a <a href="http://library.blogs.delaware.gov/2009/12/14/new-books-and-new-libraries/">recent blog post</a>, the Delaware Library Catalog announced the addition of two significant libraries to the growing statewide catalog. The Wilmington Public Library will migrate from its current Horizon ILS to the Delaware Division of Libraries- managed and SirsiDynix-hosted Symphony system.

Bill Gates fund: libraries need more cash for broadband

Over at Ars Technica is <a href="http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/12/bill-gates-fund-libraries-need-more-cash-for-broadband.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss">this story</a> on the E-rate and the issues facing libraries in providing access. "The foundation tied to the Microsoft fortune has told the Federal Communications Commission that the government should spend more money on high-speed Internet upgrades for public libraries and schools.

News Corporation, Google, and reading the news @ your library

Topic: 
Whatever the outcome of the current struggle between Google and News Corporation, public libraries hope to continue to be a source for high-quality news content, through subscription resources and other offerings. More thoughts here from the Delaware division of libraries blog: http://library.blogs.delaware.gov/2009/12/07/daily-news-content-going-offline/

What's New Over On LISWire - The Librarian's News Wire

Over at LISWire ( http://liswire.com/ ) - The Librarian's News Wire we have now posted over 200 releases. You can subscribe to one of our mailing lists Right Here. You can grab the main LISWire RSS Feed Here. There are a bunch of other feeds you can subscribe to listed Right Here. You can also follow along on Twitter Right Here.

Topic: 

Subcultural News Portal gets play at Staid InfoToday.

Topic: 
Info Today's "Newsbreaks" <a href="http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/Disinformationcom-Renovates-for-Web--56657.asp">has published a piece on Web 2.0 updates</a> by The Disinformation Company. <a href="http://disinfo.com">Disinfo.com</a> has been a subcultural/countercultural newsportal since before the fall of Loompanics Unlimited; now they've geared up to use 2.0 tools on their main site to bolster book and film sales, and to support their podcasting interests.

Click by Click, Libraries and Readers Wade Into Digital Lending

From the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/15/books/15libraries.html?hpw">NY Times:</a> "Eager to attract digitally savvy patrons and capitalize on the growing popularity of electronic readers, public libraries across the country are expanding collections of books that reside on servers rather than shelves. The idea is to capture borrowers who might not otherwise use the library, as well as to give existing customers the opportunity to try new formats."

Oss-ILS Research Project: Call for Participants

As part of an IMLS funded Early Career Research Grant, Dr. Vandana Singh (Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences at University of Tennessee-Knoxville) is working on a 3 year research project that will compare the technical support for Open Source Integrated Library Systems with proprietary Integrated Library Systems. In phase 1 of this research project, we are collecting data regarding the expectations of librarians for technical support and the available channels of technical support. We will identify the expectations of librarians about technical support for ILS (both open source software and proprietary software. And, we will assess the effectiveness of the current channels and processes for technical support in satisfying the expectations of the librarians. At this stage, we are looking for participants interested in contributing to this study. If you would be willing to participate in the study or can make some recommendations for potential participants that would be greatly appreciated. At this time, the only information we are soliciting is: Are you currently using an ILS? Are you using an open source or proprietary ILS? What type of library are you working in? (School, Public, Academic, Special, etc.) Is your library in rural area or urban? Would you be willing to participate in this study? (Participation entails responding to survey questions administered electronically and/or participating in interviews). If you are interested in the general description and progress of the project, you can find more information at

Newspapers Go To Washington

Washington is paying attention to the newspaper crisis. The president has even weighed in. But some worry that any government help would create a conflict of interest. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), sponsor of The Newspaper Revitalization Act, and Jim Moroney, publisher of The Dallas Morning News discuss what role, if any, the government should play in saving newspapers. Beyond NPR, our in-house podcast team discussed the issue in the second half of the episode A LISTen Special: Kiwi Surprise With A Side Of Buckeye Candy.
Topic: 

News Flash: Reprieve for Philly Libraries

Late Thursday afternoon, the Pennsylvania State senate passed bill 1828 by a vote of 32 to 17. For all of you who have been following the saga over the city's budget crisis, this is indeed the legislation that was needed for the City of Philadelphia to avoid the "Doomsday" Plan C budget scenario, which would have resulted in the layoff of 3,000 city employees and forced the closing of all libraries.

More from the Free Library's website.

Blackberry distractions?

I'm a Blackberry fan. I don't do much texting on it, but just the other day I brought it to a faculty meeting so that I wouldn't have to print out a pile of documents or struggle to read the notes and attachments on the projector. It is so ingrained in the faculty that cell phone use during class is a disraction; I wondered if any in the group thought that I was up to no good?

Washington State Library releases new "Hard Times Resource Guide"

For the past few months, staff at the Washington State Library have been working hard, exhaustively scouring the web and compiling quality resources to help library users across Washington State. The result? A thorough guide detailing resources and techniques to help you and your users navigate this tough economy.

Have a question? Try Ask-WA!

Ask-WA is pleased to announce the launch of Washington State's first online virtual reference portal. Connecting more than 60 libraries across the state, and backed by a worldwide cooperative, Ask-WA provides 24/7 reference service to the library users of Washington State. Ask-WA is an essential resource for students looking for citations at three in the morning, for Washington residents doing personal research, for genealogists.

Utah Gets Tough With Texting Drivers

In most states, if somebody is texting behind the wheel and causes a crash that injures or kills someone, the penalty can be as light as a fine.

Utah is much tougher.

After a crash here that killed two scientists — and prompted a dogged investigation by a police officer and local victim’s advocate — Utah passed the nation’s toughest law to crack down on texting behind the wheel. Offenders now face up to 15 years in prison.

Full story in the NYT

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Dogs Blamed For Killing Georgia Couple Are Euthanized

On August 16th there was a story on LISNEWS about a Georgia couple that was found dead on a country road. One of them was a librarian the other a professor.

Today there was a follow up in the news. The couple had been killed by wild dogs. Story here.

Topic: 

Couple found in Oglethorpe were UGA librarian, husband

Oglethorpe County authorities this afternoon released the names of the husband and wife whose bodies were found along a rural road off Georgia Highway 77 on Saturday morning. They were Lothar Karl Schweder 77, and Sherry L. Schweder, 65.

Full story here.

Topic: 

Why The Associated Press Plans to Hold Some Web Content off the Wire

In a break with tradition, The Associated Press plans to prevent members and customers from publishing some AP content on their websites. Instead, those news organizations would link to the content on a central AP website — a move that could upend the consortium’s traditional notions of syndication.

That’s one revelation from a document we obtained (labeled “AP CONFIDENTIAL — NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION”) that offers new insight into how the AP is planning to reinvent itself on the Internet according to Neiman Lab, Harvard University.

The seven-page briefing, entitled “Protect, Point, Pay — An Associated Press Plan for Reclaiming News Content Online,” was distributed to AP members late last month. It provides greater detail about the tracking device that will be attached to AP content and describes their plans to create topic pages around news stories to rival Wikipedia and major aggregation sites. And in an hour-long interview last night, the AP’s general counsel, Srinandan Kasi, also shed light on how the consortium views reuse of its material across the Internet.

Postal Service Faces Gloom Of Economy

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it lost $2.4 billion between April and June. It's on track to be $7 billion in debt by the end of September.

"What has occurred with the economy is unprecedented," Postmaster General John Potter said. "It's created, obviously, a much bigger challenge than we are able to respond to in a very quick manner."

Potter is appearing before a Senate panel Thursday to talk about the financial troubles.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News