Books

Books

Annual Who Reads What? Celebrity Reading List

The Gardiner Public Library has published their \"Who Reads What?\" survey of celebrity book picks.Gary J. Remal, Faith Hill, Christina Ricci, Nolan Ryan and others are on the list.

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Internet kills off oldest bookshop

The Times
UK
is reporting in a Very Short Story
that the worlds oldest bookstore, JOHN Smith & Son in
Glasgow\'s West End is closing thanks to competition
from online giants such as Amazon and BN.com.

The firm was founded in 1751 by John Smith, the
youngest son of the Laird of Craigend, who opened a
shop on Trongate selling books, snuff and coffee to
Glasgow\'s tobacco merchants.

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First e-ditions of e-books

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes \"Three things have made the news lately that brought parts of the web to a halt:
the hacker attacks on Yahoo,
Brittanica\'s launch as a free online encyclopedia,
and Stephen King\'s e-book \"Riding the Dollar - oops I mean- Bullet.\"

Isn\'t it nice, in a way, that two of the three were book related?

But I have a serious concern! :-)

What will happen to collectors? How does one get a first edition of an e-book? King may have missed an historic chance here! Why didn\'t he and the publishers issue a first edition for e-book collectors?

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OED is online

If you have $800us (US$550 at home) to burn you can now subscribe to the Oxford English Dictionary Online.

They do have The Word of the Day for free. Today is RELIC. They promise to add an incredible number of new words to the online version.

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Foyle\'s huge private book collection up for auction

Don\'t you wish you had the money to acquire this extraordinary collection? Read about it here. From Yahoo UK.

One of the largest British book collections in private hands, comprising more than 4,000 volumes and with works by Shakespeare, Chaucer and Dickens, is to go to auction from July 11-13, Christie\'s has said.

The private library of William Foyle, the founder of London\'s famous Foyles bookstore who died in 1963, is expected to realise more than six million pounds, the auctioneers said.

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Free expression vs. religious sensitivity

Foxnews has this story from ATHENS, Greece

It began with a small fire. About 200 religious zealots and ultra-conservatives fed the flames in January with copies of a book they call blasphemous because of passages about the possible sexual longings of Jesus Christ.

The book burning, however, was just kindling for a bigger confrontation. Political leaders, clergymen and scholars have been drawn onto the unstable ground between the nation\'s commitment to free expression and the Orthodox Christian heritage that figures strongly in Greece\'s ethnic identity.

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The last of the great salt-trading people

The NYTimes has a nice\"Story on a woman in Africa who still deals books the old fashioned way.

Oddly enough, there can still be romance in being a bookseller, an embattled yet ennobled calling these days. More accurately, let\'s say there can be passion and adventure in trafficking in books: buying, selling and bartering them, rather like dealing for salt along the old trade routes. A woman who owns a bookstore in Cape Town, South Africa, does just that. She bargains in books and jokingly refers to herself as \"the last of the great salt-trading people.\"

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Cook Books are a good read

This story from the LATimes foucuses on a different kind of book, all together.

Paging through old cookbooks published by women\'s organizations is more fun
than reading novels. Along with recipes, they offer tender memories of families
and friends, historical insights, unassuming humor, inspirational tidbits, practical
advice--even poetry.
It\'s like peeping into other people\'s lives, at least the parts of their lives that
revolved around the kitchen and dining room. The bonus is access to treasured
family recipes, set down in print for what was probably the first and only time.

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Copernicus Tempts Thieves Worldwide

BookWire has an interesting Story on the rash of rare book thefts. Keep your eye on the rare books room!

Copies of one of the world\'s rarest and most valuable books have been disappearing a rash of mysterious thefts that have perplexed police from the former Soviet Union to the United States.
At least seven of the 260 known copies of the 1543 edition of ``De revolutionibus\'\' have disappeared in recent years, including one copy each from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the Mittag-Leffler Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, according to Owen Gingerich, a professor at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. Five copies remain missing.

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Books are not just for reading now

I almost wanted to put this in Humor.

The Lansing State Journal Has a Story on the newest home decorating trend, Books!

They\'re books, but they\'re not just for reading anymore.

\"Sometimes we have interior decorators buy books by the yard for customers,\" said Ray Walsh, owner of Archives Book Shop and the Curious Book Shop in East Lansing. \"It really does add a personal touch,\" he said.

\"Every once in awhile we get someone who has model homes who buys books for display so the house doesn\'t look empty,\" Walsh said.

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Booknews: Hot New Titles for Spring

Publishers Weekly is out with a List of hot new books. The list includes.

Fair Ball: A Fan\'s Case for Baseball
The Running Mate
I Capture the Castle
Murder in Greenwich: Who Killed Martha Moxley?

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Libraries taking more steps to find overdue books

Overdue books have become quite a problem. Have a look Here. From the The News-Journal Online.

Books about Jesse James ride off library shelves into the sunset, while patrons who borrow wedding etiquette manuals often rudely fail to return the book after the ceremony. \"All kinds of books are not returned. But the ones that really don\'t come back are pregnancy and childbirth, wedding etiquette,witchcraft, cults or that type of thing,\" said Elizabeth Potts, director of the Maury County Library System. \"Jack the Ripper, anything on Jesse James, you can forget.\"

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Bed Books: Lie Down And Read

BedBooks is a company that prints sideways books. "The revolutionary way Bed Books are printed will enable you to lie in any comfortable position and hold the book at an angle that works best for you." You can Print A Page [PDF] to see just how they work. They offer books like Alice in Wonderland, The Call of the Wild and Wuthering Heights.

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Creating a global online library will spread knowledge in the quickest way to the most people

Strong Words Of Praise for the Google library project from Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan. She says beyond the emerging legal challenges, we must not lose sight of the transformative nature of Google's plan -- or the good that can come from it. "Imagine what this means for scholars, school kids and you, who, until now, might have discovered only a fraction of the material written on any subject. Or picture a small, impoverished school -- in America or anywhere in the world -- that does not have access to a substantial library but does have an Internet connection."

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NS tale slays Atwood giant in Canada Reads

slashgirl writes "'Rockbound, a 1928 novel by little-known author Frank Parker Day, has emerged victorious in CBC's annual Canada Reads book battle.'

'In a classic David-and-Goliath confrontation, Rockbound defeated Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake, a heavy-hitter that has been nominated for some of the world's most prestigious literary prizes over the past two years, including the Orange, Booker and Giller prizes. The dystopian novel is also currently competing for the 2005 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.'

Rest of the story here."

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Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived?

Anonymous Patron writes "Over @Slate, Stephen Metcalf asks Uncle Tom's Children - Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived? We have here an interesting puzzle. How has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived, and thrived, if it proved so offensive to the 20th-century aspirations of the African-Americans it helped liberate in the 19th? Why isn't Uncle Tom's Cabin like Wittgenstein's ladder: Once climbed, it is obsolete, and we ought to throw it away?
The answer, he believes, can be found in an essay from 1978 by Jane Tompkins, a prominent feminist literary critic"

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Controversy colors teen book

Anonymous Patron writes "USATODAY.com Rainbow Party, aimed at the teen market (ages 14 and up), has some booksellers and librarians wondering whether author Paul Ruditis sensationalizes the subject — and, more significantly, whether they should carry it on their shelves."

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100 Best Scottish Books of All Time

This Thursday, to coincide with World Book Day, culture minister Patricia Ferguson will begin the hunt. At a glittering ceremony, the minister will unveil a guide compiled with the Scottish Book Trust and the List magazine to the 100 Best Scottish Books of All Time and invite the public to start voting for their favourite work from the list.
But the campaign has run into controversy just days before it has begun after a draft list obtained by Scotland On Sunday shows a number of peculiar omissions and inclusions.
The winner will be announced at the Edinburgh International Book Festival in August but if you think the arguments will end there, forget it – with only one book allowed per author, the tome in question might not even be on Maley’s list. Who’s to say that Welsh’s Marabou Stork Nightmares won’t be preferred to Trainspotting? And who can discount the Harry Potter factor? Barry Didcock Says There could be a few red faces in Charlotte Square come August.

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