Blogging

Writing about blogging or just blogging

How Blogs Make It To The "Blogs To Read" List

I had three people ask questions on how the "Blogs To Read" list gets put together each year, so I thought it wise to share. First and foremost, it's not a popularity contest. Every year there have been a couple that received an avalanche of votes, and they usually make it on to the list. But more important that popularity is quality. Blogs make it on the looooong list by being suggested. I go through every blog I can find and look back at what they wrote this year. I get email, IMs, and comments on LISNews full of blogs from all over. I ask past winners, friends, and anyone else I can find. I start with as many as possible. The first list this year was about 180 blogs, which I quickly cut in half, and then with a bit more work in half again. I'm currently working my way through the final list of 30(ish) blogs now.

There are 5 that I have short listed (2 crowd favorites and 3 obvious choices) which leaves just 5 more. I'm going to try to reduce that short list of 30 to about 10 and get feedback from the other LISNews authors. And that should do it. The final list is going to be difficult this year, the short list looks like a great bunch of blogs. I don't have strict rules to eliminate blogs, but I did come up with this list that explains how the list is reduced. I go through the list, read and reread every blog and try to objectively decide if it will fit on the list this year.

Below are the things that I use to create the final list:

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A Look Back At The First 40 "Blogs To Read"

The soon to be finished "Blogs To Read in 2010" list is looking good. To help with the new list, I went through the first 40 to see how we'd done with our picks. The old lists still look pretty darn good. With just a few exceptions, most of the blogs have stood the test of time. I've listed them all below, with a brief comment for each. Be sure to let me know if you have a pick for 2010.
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Who Belongs On Our "Blogs To Read In 2010" List?

(Why This List Matters.)

We're in the final stretch of putting together our annual list, "10 Blogs To Read in 2010".

What blogs do you read every day? What blogs help you learn? What blogs keep you informed? What blogs make you laugh? Who's the best writer out there?

Think of it this way: "I read many others, but these are the LIS blogs that read even when time is short"

I'm looking for input from as many people as possible so the final list doesn't miss any new talented bloggers. My goal again this year is simple, we'll list 10 blogs that, when followed as a group, paint a complete picture of what's going on in our little world. You can leave a comment below, hit the contact form, or send an email to [email protected].

Before you nominate, take a look at past winners, they aren't eligible for 2010:

10 Blogs To Read in 2006
http://www.lisnews.org/node/17775

10 Blogs To Read In 2007
http://www.lisnews.org/node/20341

The LISNews 10 Blogs To Read In 2008
http://lisnews.org/node/28830

10 Blogs To Read In 2009
http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2009

Library Gift Tags

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<A HREF=" http://www.ourcitylights.org/2009/12/library-themed-holiday-gift-tags.html">Perhaps the perfect way to wrap a present for the book lover in your family?</A>

Nominations & Conference Destinations

I’m very humbled to announce that I have been nominated by my friend Buffy Hamilton for the 2009 Edublog Awards in the category of

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Favorite Blogs This Year? Put Them On "The Blogs To Read In 2010" List!

(Why This List Matters.)

It's never too early to start thinking about "10 Blogs To Read in 2010". Well, ok, so maybe there was a time when it was too early, but that time has passed. Let's start thinking about our favorite blogs.

What blogs do you read every day? What blogs help you learn? What blogs keep you informed? What blogs make you laugh? Who's the best writer out there?

When building my list, I like to think of it this way: "I read many others, but these are the LIS blogs that read even when time is short"

Your list doesn't need to be complete or fair. I'm looking for input from as many people as possible so the final list doesn't miss anyone new or overlooked. My goal again this year, 10 blogs that, when followed as a group, paint a complete picture of what's going on in our little world.

Before your nominate, take a look at past winners, they aren't eligible for 2009:

10 Blogs To Read in 2006
http://www.lisnews.org/node/17775

10 Blogs To Read In 2007
http://www.lisnews.org/node/20341

The LISNews 10 Blogs To Read In 2008
http://lisnews.org/node/28830

10 Blogs To Read In 2009
http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2009

You can leave a comment below, hit the contact form, or send an email to [email protected].

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #91

This week's episode contains an interview with web celeb Cali Lewis about blogging today and recent rumblings from the Federal Trade Commission about disclosures bloggers must make. Related links: Cali Lewis on Twitter GeekBrief TV The Blog of Cali Lewis Linux Outlaws LISNews Account Registration

Rebel Librarians? Yes, please!

The following is our most recent Story of the Week from The Merry Librarian (www.merrylibrarian.com), dated Oct. 11th, 2009. A new story is posted every week on our site. Be sure to check us out!

"Rebel Librarians? Yes, please!"

Library patrons are, by nature, very delicate clientele. They enter our doors with all kinds of requests and needs, but we, being the stodgy librarians we all are, sometimes forget that they are to be treated with absolute sensitivity. Sometimes, we blunder. We inadvertently step on someone’s toes with cold-hearted requests such as, “Please use headphones when listening to your death metal music on your laptop,” or “We’d appreciate it if you’d leave your flask of whiskey at home next time.” And we may slip up occasionally and ask difficult and alarming questions, such as, “What’s the title of the book you’re looking for?”. But hey, we’re only human…right?

Librarian: What can I do for you?

Patron: Can you check to see if a book is in your library?

Librarian: Sure! What book are you looking for?

Patron: I knew you were going to ask that! I just had it…and when you asked me that I forgot it right away!

…pause…

Librarian: Oops…sorry about that, is there anything you know about the book that I can possibly use to find the title?

Patron: No! You shouldn’t have said anything!

Librarian: …

Another Day, Another Taser

The following is posted from www.merrylibrarian.com from our Story of the Week archives, dated Oct. 4th, 2009. Check out the site for all of our stories!

"Another Day, Another Taser"

Just in case you haven’t gotten the memo, we no longer live in the cheerful, black-and-white world of “Leave It To Beaver.” The streets aren’t even clean anymore, much less safe. Where the public library was once a quiet, quaint place for study and leisurely reading, it has now become a strange mix of internet cafe/detention hall/day care/reading room/homeless shelter. Don’t get us wrong–we aren’t complaining (too much)! The library is supposed to be for everyone, and we gladly open our doors to any person who may walk through them.

But let’s face it: the whole “libraries are for everyone” thing means we get a lot of unsavory people stumbling past our desks everyday. And with them, we get a whole slew of uncomfortable situations. (It is the Merry Librarian’s humble opinion that librarians everywhere should be considered for the Nobel Peace Prize.) But the true heroes of the library are easily the library security guards. They undoubtedly see the worst. Not only do they get the porno freaks and drunks, they get the screamers, irate parents, gangsters, predators, thieves, liars, abandoned children, squatters…you name it.

Tough Love From a Tough Dad

The following is a post from The Merry Librarian (www.merrylibrarian.com) dated Sept. 27th, 2009. Check out the website for all postings!

"Tough Love from a Tough Dad"

This week’s Story of the Week is one of the rare stories that is genuinely heartwarming (though we’re sure there are more out there!). As librarians–as with any public service profession–we so often see the sad and traumatic family interactions. It is refreshing to witness powerful and positive relationships like this one. Thank you, “Diane”, for this great story!

I work at a small library in an area of town that tends to house the lower-economic demographic. It is not unusual for things to be stolen from our library on a regular basis–most frequently our DVDs. One day, I was at the reference desk when a man came in with a young, teenage boy. The man looked pretty haggard. He had tattoos everywhere (even a cross between his eyebrows! Ouch!) and lots of piercings. He looked like he’d had a pretty hard life. When he came up to the desk, he set a very tall pile of DVDs in front of me–at least 20 DVDs.

“I found these in my son’s room,” he said. “He didn’t check them out. He stole them.”

I didn’t quite know how to respond, so I (rather stupidly) said, “Oh. Okay. So none of them are checked out?”

“No, ma’am,” he answered. Then he knelt down on the ground so that he was eye to eye with me. His son knelt beside him, looking deeply humiliated and angry.

The Merry Librarian: True Stories from a Library Near You…No "Shh"!

Here's a new website for librarians to check out, The Merry Librarian(www.merrylibrarian.com), and features true stories submitted by librarians from around the world. The stories range from hilarious to heartbreaking; and anyone who has ever worked in a library will both enjoy the stories and relate to the outrageous situations librarians find themselves in.

What Not To Post To Your Blog

Walt: Maybe I’m getting superstitious, but after reading through a quarter’s posts on 520 (or so) liblogs, I have a suggestion for anyone who’s been neglecting your blog for a while, but thinks you’ll do better in the future:

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A Blogger Makes a Pitch for Supporting Print

Blogs are often criticized for helping to kill print media. Last week, though, the prominent political blogger Andrew Sullivan used his forum on TheAtlantic.com to tell readers to subscribe to the print edition of the magazine.

It worked. Within two days after last Monday’s post, Mr. Sullivan’s appeal pulled in 75 percent of the subscriptions that the Web site draws in a typical month, the magazine’s publisher, Jay Lauf, said. The Atlantic expects this month’s subscription orders to be double an average month’s.

Full article here.

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Tolkien estate settles 'Lord of the Rings' wrangle

The estate of fantasy writer J.R.R Tolkien has reached a settlement with the studio behind the "Lord of the Rings" movies after alleging it had not received "even one penny" of royalties from the trilogy of money-spinning films, officials said Tuesday.

You there -- Anonymous -- You Could Be Fingered by Google

A blogger stripped of her anonymity by the US courts has said she plans to sue Google for handing over her real identity.

Rosemary Port, a 29-year-old fashion student from New York, has said she will file a $15m (£9m) lawsuit against the internet giant after it complied with an order from a US court to reveal that she was behind the vitriolic "Skanks in NYC" blog.

The case erupted last week after the Manhattan Supreme Court ruled that Google must hand over the identity of the writer, who had targeted 36-year-old model Liskula Cohen online and called her a "psychotic, lying, whoring... skank".

Cohen had filed a lawsuit demanding that the writer's identity be revealed, an argument that judge Joan Madden agreed with. Guardian UK , Salon, New York Post report.

Want the site? It's now available.

Facebook Acquires FriendFeed

An announcement was posted to the FriendFeed blog that FriendFeed accepted Facebook's acquisition offer. Between that post and a report from TechCrunch, it appears that FriendFeed will operate as it is now for the time being until discussions conclude about integration into Facebook's product offerings.

Book Club on Twitter...Tweet It, Just Tweet It

From Shelf Awareness and The Book Studio: NOTE - NEW DATE & NEW INFO. FOR BOOKCLUB(see below)...

For readers intrigued by the challenge of a book discussion in 140 characters or less, the Twitter Book Club has chosen Elizabeth Strout's Olive Kitteridge for its next meeting, August 10, 2009 at 9:00 pm Eastern Time. Grab your copy of Olive Kitteridge: Fiction, a glass or mug of your favorite beverage, and join us. Olive Kitteridge was the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction.

We're thrilled to announce that Elizabeth Strout, the author of Olive Kitteridge, will be participating in the discussion as well!

Questions? Post a comment below, ask on Twitter (@thebookmaven or @booksquare), or even use good old email: bethanne at thebookstudio dotcom.

The online book club meets live on Twitter on the second and third Monday of every month and is co-hosted by the Book Studio's Bethanne Patrick and and Kassia Krozser of Booksquare.

A.P. Ready to Recieve Your Payments...Even For Articles in the Public Domain

Article in BoingBoing:
James Grimmelman sez,

The Associated Press -- which thinks you owe it a license fee if you quote more than four words from one of its articles -- doesn't even care if the words actually came from its article. They'll charge you anyway, even if you're quoting from the public domain.

I picked a random AP article and went to their "reuse options" site. Then, when they asked what I wanted to quote, I punched in Thomas Jefferson's famous argument against copyright. Their license fee: $12 for an educational 26-word quote. FROM THE PUBLIC FREAKING DOMAIN, and obviously, obviously not from the AP article. But the AP is too busy trying to squeeze the last few cents out of a dying business model to care about little things like free speech or the law.

Thanks to Bill Drew & Michael Sauers for the tip.

Library Day in the Life...

What do librarians do all day? You probably know, but others would like to know as well. Why not participate in the Library Day in the Life project?

1.Post your activities on your blog, or if you don't have a blog, start one at p b wiki (it's free)!
2. Add your name, your job title (so we can see what you do at a glance) and a link to your blog.
3. Start blogging.
4. Tag your posts with librarydayinthelife.
5. After your first blog post come back and edit this page to change your blog link to a link to your tagged posts.
6. Add your Flickr photos or videos to the Group on Flickr.

Thank you to Bobbi Newman for this wonderful idea! You can read the post that inspired librarydayinthelife on Bobbi's site Librarian by Day.

...and thanks to Trevor A. Dawes for the tip!

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