Blogging

Writing about blogging or just blogging

LISNews Now Available Via Kindle Blogs

And now LISNews is available by way of the Kindle platform: http://ur1.ca/4xp1k

As noted in the notice above captured from Identica, LISNews is now available via Kindle Blogs. Amazon sets the price for a monthly subscription and right now it is set at $1.99. We've got no input at all as to what Amazon charges in this instance. As long as you have a Kindle device you can get posts right out of the main feed delivered via Whispernet. According to Amazon, links in stories will work and will take you to linked content. This is a bit of an experiment in plumbing LISNews content into other platforms. To get a subscription, visit Amazon. If you want to transmogrify RSS feeds on your own, see the right-hand side of the LISNews page for the XML link chiclet.

Have a Library Story You'd Like to Tell?

...but don't want to create your own blog (or connect the story to a specific library or librarian...)? Here's an answer from a LISNews blogger who calls him/herself 'librarytales'.

Check out the blog and feel free to participate. Here's the first post from "LiliumCruentum":

"After working in a public library for several years I have accumulated all kinds of crazy stories to tell. After my animated re-tellings, friends and family often joke with me about how I should create a website to share some of my funny, crazy, and touching experiences from work - so this blog has been long overdue!

Please feel free to submit some of your own "tales from the library" - whether you are a patron or an employee! The good, the bad, the unexpected, scary, hilarious, horrendous, enlightening, and of course the crazy - you can email them all to me, along with your name, at [email protected] (Neither your email nor your last name will be published - only your first name or screen name.)

I look forward to hearing from you all, and to sharing some of my own experiences with the world as well!"

Why Don't More Authors and Publishers 'Get' Libraries?

If you're on twitter and you're a book person, you probably follow @glecharles, aka Guy LeCharles Gonzalez, the LoudPoet. If not, you should.

Here's a bit from a recent post from his blog:

Beyond all of the philosophical reasons to support libraries, there are three very concrete reasons I can think of:

  • Discoverability: With the volume of books being published each year growing exponentially, it’s increasingly difficult for any book to rise above the noise and connect with its audience. While “curation” is the buzzword du jour, librarians have been curating books forever, and there are far more libraries than bookstores in this country. Most library websites are better than your average independent booksellers’, too, and as ebooks become increasingly popular, being visible on more than Amazon, B&N and Goodreads will be a critical advantage. As ebook business models evolve, direct partnerships with libraries become an option, too, like the recent innovative deal between the Colorado Independent Publishers Association and Douglas County Libraries.
  • New to Blogging

    Hello! I am a Certified School Library Media Specialist and I have started my own blog with Blogger. I am trying to include things that will make my blog unique, useful, and worth the time to visit. What type of information do you feel is really needed in a Library Blog? Book reviews? Lesson plans? Any advice is appreciated. jfsanborn.blogspot.com

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    LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #153

    (Posted early by direction of The Producer) This week's episode features an interview with Patrick Frey of Patterico's Pontifications about the recent Blogger disruption and an unseemly incident that arose from it. An essay and a news miscellany are also featured. Related links: Ed Bott: Blogger outage makes case against cloud-only strategy Instapundit on the outage at the Ann Althouse blog Patterico: On nitecruzr and the memory hole Patterico: The full support thread saved from expurgation Google's copy of the support thread with expurgations bin Laden and mechanical backhaul for e-mail The Register on the bin Laden e-mail cache Wizzy Digital Courier, a lab set-up solution that can use mechanical backhaul Evan Prodromou highlighting the launch of Open Font Library and Open Clip Art Library 3.0 Dave Winer on super-injunctions GigaOm on super-injunctions Dave Winer on Web 2.0 Expiration Date National Review Online's Media Blog on New York Times online traffic Library of Congress press office announcing awards in federal librarianship CBC News: Kutcher to join Two and a Half Mean

    Other found things...

    BILL CLINTON IS A XXXXXXXXXXXXX -- Midwest Conservative Journal
    Coyle's InFormation: Dystopias
    "Really, if we don't do this, the future of libraries and research will be decided by Google. There, I said it."
    Voices for the Library» Blog Archive » Are volunteers happy to run libraries?
    Senate bill gives feds power to order piracy site blacklisting
    Rutgers team proposes Net alternative
    Rutgers team proposes Net alternative
    Spammer-in chief? | Gene Healy | Beltway Confidential | Washington Examiner
    New graphics engine imperils users of Firefox and Chrome
    CILIP | Clear messages
    New resources to demonstrate value of further education libraries
    The Business Rusch: Writing Like It’s 1999 | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
    The Business Rusch: Advocates, Addendums, and Sneaks, oh my! | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
    How Robber Barons hijacked the "Victorian Internet"

    Creative Commons License
    Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #153 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

    Anatomy of a Librarian?

    From Stephen Abrams' Lighthouse, fascinating infographic profiles members of the profession. The author welcomes your opinions.

    Social Bookmarking Service Delicious Purchased

    From "Ownership" to "Access" Culture

    I’m a Baby-Boomer, and so is my wife who was my high school sweetheart. We were both raised in Middle America with traditional values which we adopted – get educated, work at a career, own a house and two cars, support your local school and church, enjoy the American Dream.

    The American Dream is, according to our friends at Wikipedia (sorry to those of you who think it’s a site that makes kids dumb, but I find it very much a modern encyclopedia that is highly useful and mostly filled with very useful information):

    In the definition of the American Dream by James Truslow Adams in 1931, "life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement" regardless of social class or circumstances of birth.

    [BTW: Can you spell E-N-C-Y-C-L-O-P-E-D-I-A from memory? Did you learn to spell it from Jiminy Cricket too.]

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    The Guardian: Yahoo! to sell Delicious

    The Guardian reports that Yahoo! is rumored to be preparing to sell Delicious to StumbleUpon. From the story:
    At the same time of the December announcement the handful of engineers who were developing the Delicious system are understood to have either been sacked or redeployed inside Yahoo, leaving only support staff.
    Services like Pinboard and Opera Link exist as potential replacements among other offerings online.

    My First Library Meme....

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    Want an Awful Library Book?

    Holly and Mary from Awful Library Books are doing some weeding! Some great gift material here for the right person; check it out.

    LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Unnumbered Special Edition (23 February 2011)

    New Site From Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy INFOdocket.com

    This is Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy saying hello from Washington, DC and St. Petersburg, FL.
    We have some news and a few URLs to share.

    URL: http://INFOdocket.com/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/INFOdocket
    RSS: http://infodocket.com/feed/

    When we began ResourceShelf (just about a decade ago) and DocuTicker (two years later) our goal was, and has always been, to share info industry news, happenings in the library world, and supply a non-stop stream of new web-based resources to our loyal readers. Since we began, we've been very fortunate that so many of you have found what we do to be useful.

    We would like to say thank you very much for your interest and support. We've also been happy to see that our websites are of interest to a wide variety of readers outside of the library community, including journalists and educators.

    Today, we have a bit of news to share.

    We (Gary and Shirl) are NO LONGER affiliated with ResourceShelf and DocuTicker. However, that doesn't mean it's time to say goodbye. Hardly. In fact, the same spirit that has compelled us to scour the Internet for interesting resources is also what’s motivating us to jump right back in again. That’s right – as of today, we’re back online.

    While we’re still taking baby steps, and both sites are in the process of development, we thought it was best to begin posting the types of materials you've come to expect from us during the past decade as we construct our new sites. We also feel comfortable saying that we have several new features in the works.

    The LISNews Blogs To Read in 2011

    If you're like me (and you know you want to be) you'll find this year's list surprisingly unterrible when compared to the vast majority of librarian blogs. I started the "10 Blogs To Read This Year" way back in 2006 to help highlight the wide range of people writing in the many different areas of librarianship. Each year we've attempted to point out a group of librarians whose writing helps increase our understanding of the profession and its place in our rapidly changing world. Again this year we tried to choose 10 writers who cover very different aspects of our profession, 10 sites that inform, educate and maybe amuse. By following these blogs I think you'll frequently find something new and interesting to read, and a place to gain better understanding of parts of librarianship that are outside of your area. We all have much to learn from each other, and these bloggers are working hard to share their knowledge and experiences with you. The lists from 2006, 2007, 2008,2009 and 2010. See also: How The List Is Made and Why This List Matters.

    1. All These Birds With Teeth [Feed]
    2. Forgotten Bookmarks [Feed]
    3. Hack Library School. [Feed]
    4. InkDroid [Feed]
    5. The LSW Friendfeed Room [Feed]
    6. Musings about librarianship [Feed]
    7. Pegasus Librarian [Feed]
    8. SearchReSearch [Feed]
    9. Screwy Decimal [Feed]
    10. The Undergraduate Science Librarian [Feed]

    A Stealth Librarian Manifesto (from Confessions of a Science Librarian)

    <blockquote> "Stealth librarianship is a way of being...the principles of stealth librarianship apply to all branches of the profession, each in particular ways...the core is the same: to thrive and survive in a challenging environment, we must subtly and not-so-subtly insinuate ourselves into the lives of our patrons.

    AOL Buys Huffington Post

    In a stunning move, BBC News reports that AOL is buying the Huffington Post. The Media Network blog at Radio Netherlands Worldwide notes that Arianna Huffington will move from being editor of a center-left group blog to heading up AOL's content division including properties like TechCrunch, Engadget, Moviefone, Mapquest, and more. The LA Times reported that this is AOL's largest acquisition since it was divorced from Time Warner. Advertising Age reports that the content properties will be merged into the "Huffington Post Media Group". The Tatler, the group blog of center-right media group Pajamas Media, also weighed in on the acquisition.

    Library Christmas Carol

    From The Wikiman Blog, a "Library Christmas Carol", a seasonal look at changes in libraryland. The story has the classic characters of Scrooge and Marley, but is updated to include online subscriptions, social media, the Ghosts of Libraries Past and other Library 2.0 stuff.

    Name Your Favorite New Librarian Blogs - 10 Blogs To Read in 2011

    As we quickly march toward the end of 2010, the pressure is mounting to produce the annual list of blogs to read in the coming year. We'll consider any blogs that might be of interest to librarians. They need not be famous or long lived, in fact we're always looking for NEW sites and new writers doing interesting work.
    Our past lists:

    10 Blogs To Read in 2006
    http://www.lisnews.org/node/17775
    10 Blogs To Read In 2007
    http://www.lisnews.org/node/20341
    10 Blogs To Read In 2008
    http://lisnews.org/node/28830
    10 Blogs To Read In 2009
    http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2009
    10 Blogs To Read in 2010
    http://www.lisnews.org/10_librarian_blogs_read_2010

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    If It's Shared Online, It's Shared With the Whole World

    There is no privacy online. NOT FOR WORK OR THE SQUEAMISH/or OLD FUDDY-DUDDIES.

    A vigilant LISNews reader told me about the Duke grad and her powerpoint sex project.

    Karen Owen's PowerPoint list is more famous now than she ever could have imagined. Owen, a Duke graduate of 2010, has become an internet sensation after a mock-thesis titled, "An education beyond the classroom: excelling in the realm of horizontal academics," went viral around the internet and propelled her into the mainstream media spotlight.

    Since creating the now widely-seen list -- a project rating her sexual conquests during her time at Duke -- Owen has been thrust to the forefront of discussions about sex on college campuses and amongst American youth, including stories on prominent outlets such as CBSNews.com and on NBC's The Today Show, as well as garnering huge attention in the blogosphere.

    And from Jezebel, the 42-page presentation (slides 9, 10 about sex in the library). And now the publishers have come to call.

    About Those Publishers e-Book Prices...

    First reported a few days ago, the pundits are now adding their 2 cents.

    This from Dan Gillmor at Salon: When America's book publishers wrested control of e-book prices from Amazon earlier this year, I expected two results. First, prices would go up. Second, I'd buy fewer new Kindle books. I got that part right.

    What I didn't expect, however, was that publishers would be so incredibly foolish as to start raising e-book prices to the point that they were close to, and in a few cases above, the hardcover prices. Here's a non-literary term for this policy: nuts.

    I've been keeping loose track of this trend for months, and had noticed that some hardcover books were getting close to the Kindle prices. Then the barrier fell, as the New York Times reported this week, when at least two books actually were more costly to read on Kindle devices than the actual physical book.

    How did this happen? It's a classic Traditional Media vs. the Digital Age story. The key players are Amazon, the major book publishers and Apple.

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