Library Of Congress

Library Of Congress

Jerry Lewis career archive enters the Library of Congress

An extensive archive from comedian Jerry Lewis' career, including rarely seen films, long-lost TV recordings and home videos, will have a new home at the Library of Congress, curators announced Monday.

The collection includes thousands of documents and recordings. Lewis is donating some items, while others are being purchased by the library from his personal archive. Some materials will be available immediately to researchers in Washington.

From Jerry Lewis career archive enters the Library of Congress

Brewster Kahle, creator of the Internet Archive, should be the next Librarian of Congress.

My nominee for the post, and I'm far from alone in saying this, is Brewster Kahle. (Disclosure: He’s a friend.) For the past two decades he's led one of the genuine treasures of our age, as founder and director—he calls himself “digital librarian”—of the Internet Archive. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he's been a founder or co-founder of some of the most path-breaking technology projects in recent times, including the Wide Area Information Server, an early Internet publishing system, and the Alexa Internet catalog system, which he sold to Amazon in the 1990s. His biography is amazing, and his commitment to the public good is inspiring.

From Brewster Kahle, creator of the Internet Archive, should be the next Librarian of Congress.

Books That Shaped America | National Book Festival - Library of Congress

The Library of Congress, the world’s largest repository of knowledge and information, began a multiyear “Celebration of the Book” with an exhibition on “Books That Shaped America.” The initial books in the exhibition are displayed below.

“This list is a starting point,” said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. “It is not a register of the ‘best’ American books – although many of them fit that description. Rather, the list is intended to spark a national conversation on books written by Americans that have influenced our lives, whether they appear on this initial list or not.”

We hope you will view the list, discuss it with your friends and family, and most importantly, choose to read and discuss some of the books on this list, reflecting America’s unique and extraordinary literary heritage, which the Library of Congress makes available to the world.

From Books That Shaped America | National Book Festival - Library of Congress

ALA Questions Bid for Independent Copyright Office

Via Publishers Weekly:

The American Library Association is joining a chorus of Internet and tech businesses in questioning a proposal to remove the U.S. Copyright Office from the purview of the Library of Congress, and to establish it as its own independent agency.

Who Will Be Appointed as Next Librarian of Congress

The President, in this case, Barack Obama, appoints the Librarian of Congress. Here's the statute about that particular appointment.

Should it be a presidential appointment? Should the next office holder have a degree in Library Science (Mr. Billington did not).

Infodocket has more information on the period of transition, including this:

LC tells us that while no timeline is in place at the moment, President Obama has “roughly” six months to consider nominees for the vacancy. If a new Librarian of Congress is not confirmed by the time of Dr. Billington’s retirement, David Mao, Deputy Librarian, would serve as Acting Librarian of Congress until the time a new leader is confirmed by the Senate. Mao holds both legal and library degrees.

GAO report finds America’s ‘national library’ is lacking in leadership

The federal government’s watchdog agency released a critical report Tuesday on the Library of Congress’s long-standing failures to manage the complex computer systems that are vital to its mission. Read the rest here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/museums/americas-national-library-is-behind-the-digital-curve-a-new-report-finds/2015/03/31/fad54c3a-d3fd-11e4-a62f-ee745911a4ff_story.html Also reported by Wall Street Journal's CIO Report: http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2015/04/01/the-government-tells-the-library-of-congress-to-hire-a-permanent-cio

Now on View at the Library of Congress, One of the Four Surviving Copies of the Magna Carta

Via the Washington Post: A yellowing piece of parchment covered in Latin, the Magna Carta now on view at the Library of Congress is as charming as a tax form. Hey, no one ever said cornerstones of constitutional law and civil liberty had to be pretty.

Magna Carta (experts drop the preceding “the”) got off to a rough start. When King John signed the “Great Charter” in 1215, on a field near London, he had no intention of appeasing its authors, barons who chafed at too-high taxes. But because they’d captured London, the king had no choice, says Nathan Dorn, curator of “Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor,” a new exhibit at the Library of Congress.

The barons made at least 41 copies and sent them to every county in England. The document on view is one of four surviving copies; the original is lost.

A Philandering President's Love Letters To Go on Display

From the New York Times a preview of the collection of love letters between President Warren G. Harding and his mistress, Carrie Fulton Phillips. The letters are going on display next week at the Library of Congress.

Moving Day for Priceless Historical Documents

From the New York Times a fascinating look at how invaluable historical documents and artifacts are secured while in transit.

African-American Interviews to be Hosted at Library of Congress

The small details of everyday life and more profound events that get to the heart of the black experience in America are part of an ambitious video history called The HistoryMakers that has become part of the Library of Congress, the library is expected to announce Tuesday.

The collection includes 9,000 hours of video interviews with 2,600 African-Americans in more than 35 states. More from the New York Times.

Library Of Congress Searches For Missing Jefferson Books

Staffers at the Library of Congress have been looking for 250 books that belonged to Thomas Jefferson. He gave these books and several thousand more to start the library more than 200 years ago.

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/29/316891473/library-of-congress-searches-for-missing-jefferson-b...

MP3 - http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2014/05/20140529_me_library_of_congress_searches_for_m...

Russian court demands U.S. Library of Congress hand over Jewish texts

Good Shabbat.

Via Reuters: A Russian court demanded on Thursday that the U.S. Library of Congress hand back seven precious Jewish texts to Moscow - and, in a tit-for-tat ruling, said it should pay a massive fine for every day it delays.

The so-called Schneerson collection, claimed by both Russia and the New York-based Hasidic Chabad-Lubavitch group, has become a bone of contention in Russia-U.S. ties, at their lowest for decades due to the Ukraine crisis.

The Library of Congress has seven books of the collection, Interfax reported. Russia has 4,425 texts, including editions of the Torah and the Talmud, some of them dating back to to the 16th century. A Moscow arbitration court ruled that the Library of Congress should pay $50,000 in fines for every day the seven books are not handed over.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #254

This week we focus on a very particular part of the potential fall-out of the currently brewing fiscal emergency for the federal government in the United States. The Library of Congress contingency advisory for a government shut down announces shuttering of their websites and Cyrus Farivar at Ars Technica reports that they're not the only agency planning to go dark online. The President's Weekly Address and the Republican Response are both replayed to help provide context as to the struggle leading up to the possible lapse in federal spending authority on October 1st at midnight.

Download here (MP3) or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Throw a paperback at us via this Amazon picklist to help recharge the imaginations of the Air Staff.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

Library of Congress Transitions to Free, Online-Only Cataloging Publications

The Library of Congress has announced a transition to online-only publication of its cataloging documentation. As titles that are in production are released, the Library’s Cataloging Distribution Service (CDS) will no longer print new editions of its subject headings, classification schedules and other cataloging publications. The Library will instead provide free downloadable PDF versions of these titles.

For users desiring enhanced functionality, the Library’s two web-based subscription services, Cataloger’s Desktop and Classification Web, will continue as products from CDS.

In 2012, the Library of Congress conducted an extensive study on the impact and opportunities of changes in the bibliographic framework and the technological environment on the future distribution of its cataloging data and products. The Library’s transition from print to online-only for cataloging documentation is a response to a steadily declining customer base for print and the availability of alternatives made possible by advances in technology. This shift will enable the Library to achieve a more sustainable financial model and better serve its mission in the years ahead.

Beginning July 1, print publications that are currently sold through CDS will become available as free, downloadable PDF titles through the Library’s Acquisitions and Bibliographic Access Directorate website at www.loc.gov/aba/. Because all of the content cannot be made available simultaneously, the retrospective titles will be phased in over time as PDF files.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #242

And we're back. The first episode after the production suspension has a series of brief essays followed by a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Torrent), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

Jefferson's Legacy: A Brief History of the Library of Congress

Reaching out to the academic market in time for the new school year, the Library of Congress and Copia Interactive today announced the free eBook release of Jefferson's Legacy: A Brief History of the Library of Congress, the Library's hallmark publication, as well as a collection of rare lectures.

Read more here

Librarian of Congress Names Interim Copyright Royalty Judge

The Librarian of Congress has named an interim copyright royalty judge to serve for the next six months or until the vacancy is filled.

Richard Strasser has been appointed to fill the vacancy left by Judge Stanley Wisniewski, who retired at the end of August. James Billington, the Librarian of Congress, appoints copyright royalty judges in consultation with the register of copyrights.

Former Library of Congress Auditor Says He was Fired for Being Gay

From The Washington Post: Peter TerVeer was an up-and-coming auditor for the Library of Congress’s inspector general’s office. His boss liked him so much he tried to set him up with his single daughter, TerVeer says.

But when the boss discovered TerVeer was gay after learning from his daughter TerVeer “Liked” a Facebook page for same-sex parents, the supervisor harassed him with religious-based homophobia — and eventually got him fired, TerVeer alleges in a federal lawsuit.

The lawsuit, filed Aug. 3 in U.S. District Court in Washington, claims that TerVeer, 30, suffered discrimination based on sex stereotyping and his religious beliefs in violation of Title VII of the U.S. Civil Rights Act.

It charges that TerVeer was subjected to a hostile work environment for more than a year by his supervisor, John Mech, who quoted biblical passages to him condemning homosexuality.

Additional details in The Washington Blade.

Unknown Civil War Soldier Portrait at LOC Identified

His face has been printed in books and used in films, but for decades, no one knew the name of the fierce-eyed Civil War soldier in the portrait, known only as “unidentified.”


But a chance encounter between an avid Civil War photography collector and Villa Rica, Ga., resident Patricia Mullinax at last allowed the Library of Congress, which has the portrait, to identify her great-great grandfather, Stephen Pollard.

Pollard was a Confederate soldier from Georgia with a thin moustache, wearing an old-fashioned tie, with a brace of pistols in his belt and an 1855 muzzle-loading pistol, with stock, in his two hands, according to the Washington Post. The young soldier went on to survive the Civil War — and eventually have his image featured in Ken Burns’s famous film on the conflict, becoming famous, but still unknown.

Seth MacFarlane Donates Boxes of Carl Sagan's Papers to the Library of Congress

From the article:

The creator of the hit animated series "Family Guy" has donated a vast trove of the late astronomer Carl Sagan's papers to the Library of Congress, officials announced today (June 27).

Writer, producer and director Seth MacFarlane gave the U.S. Library of Congress — the largest library in the world — about 800 boxes of material documenting Sagan's life and work. The papers include book drafts, "idea files" on various subjects and Sagan's extensive correspondence.

More from Space.com.

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