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LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #153

(Posted early by direction of The Producer)

This week's episode features an interview with Patrick Frey of Patterico's Pontifications about the recent Blogger disruption and an unseemly incident that arose from it. An essay and a news miscellany are also featured.

Related links:
Ed Bott: Blogger outage makes case against cloud-only strategy
Instapundit on the outage at the Ann Althouse blog
Patterico: On nitecruzr and the memory hole
Patterico: The full support thread saved from expurgation
Google's copy of the support thread with expurgations
bin Laden and mechanical backhaul for e-mail
The Register on the bin Laden e-mail cache
Wizzy Digital Courier, a lab set-up solution that can use mechanical backhaul
Evan Prodromou highlighting the launch of Open Font Library and Open Clip Art Library 3.0
Dave Winer on super-injunctions
GigaOm on super-injunctions
Dave Winer on Web 2.0 Expiration Date
National Review Online's Media Blog on New York Times online traffic
Library of Congress press office announcing awards in federal librarianship
CBC News: Kutcher to join Two and a Half Mean

Other found things...

BILL CLINTON IS A XXXXXXXXXXXXX -- Midwest Conservative Journal
Coyle's InFormation: Dystopias
"Really, if we don't do this, the future of libraries and research will be decided by Google. There, I said it."

Voices for the Library» Blog Archive » Are volunteers happy to run libraries?
Senate bill gives feds power to order piracy site blacklisting
Rutgers team proposes Net alternative
Rutgers team proposes Net alternative

Spammer-in chief? | Gene Healy | Beltway Confidential | Washington Examiner
New graphics engine imperils users of Firefox and Chrome
CILIP | Clear messages
New resources to demonstrate value of further education libraries
The Business Rusch: Writing Like It’s 1999 | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
The Business Rusch: Advocates, Addendums, and Sneaks, oh my! | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
How Robber Barons hijacked the "Victorian Internet"

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #153 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. -- Read More

19:36 minutes (8.98 MB)
mp3
[audio-player]

At Google, the Book Tour Becomes Big Business

When Tina Fey visited the Bay Area in April on her book tour for “Bossypants,” she made just two stops. She gave an interview before a sold-out crowd at the Orpheum Theater, as part of the City Arts & Lectures series. And she dropped by the Mountain View headquarters of Google.

Full article at NYT

Google to Sell $20/Month Laptops

Google will begin renting laptop computers for $20 per month, a senior Google executive told Forbes. The laptops will run Google's Chrome OS, a computer operating system that does away with local storage and applications in favor of a Web browser...and only a Web browser. The browser, of course, is Google Chrome. Initially, the $20/month laptop package will only be offered to students, the report states, but it is surely a precursor to Google's greater ambitions, in both educational institutions and the enterprise.

Full article

Google Doodle Honors 76th Birthday of 'Mr. Men' Author Roger Hargreaves

Google is celebrating what would have been the 76th birthday of children's author Roger Hargreaves with a series of homepage doodles depicting characters from his popular Mr. Men and Little Miss books.
Google doodlers have crafted more than a dozen versions of the company's logo featuring the cartoon characters from Hargreaves' books, from Little Miss and Mr. Tickle to Mr. Happy and Mr. Messy.

Hargreaves' career as a children's book author started in 1971 when his young son asked him, "What does a tickle look like?" To explain, Hargreaves created Mr. Tickle, a small orange man with a big smile, tiny blue hat, and very long arms. That spawned five other characters—Mr. Greedy, Mr. Nosey, Mr. Happy, Mr. Bump, and Mr. Sneeze—the books for which were first published on August 10, 1971.

Full article at PC Magazine

Ruling Spurs Effort to Form Digital Public Library

A judge’s derailment of Google’s plan to build a digital library and bookstore was seen by some scholars and librarians as a chance to pursue a better universal public library.

Full article

Creating a digital public library without Google's money

Like other authors and researchers, I'm conflicted about the project. On the plus side, the vision of a widely accessible digital library is a worthy one that is, for the first time in human history, technologically achievable.

On the other hand, Google was plotting to acquire effective control over millions of works whose copyrights belong to others.

Full article in the LA Times

Google as ENEMY

The United States of America has a history of uniting its often uncooperative and sometimes antagonistic citizenry in profound and unthinkable ways when the country perceives an outside threat to its peace and safety.

For the most part, the recent history of this country has been one of success and prosperity, or at least one where the prosperous became more so, and because of that complacency spawned from prosperity, this country has never seen the need to create a National Digital Library. (Also, because Capitalism is good for America. I claim poetic license for hyperbole.)

[see: "Why We Can't Afford Not to Create a Well-Stocked National Digital Library System" or any of the other posts lamenting this American FAIL.]

But Google saw the need. Well, if not the need for the country, then the need for Google. As Google digitized books, it increased its digital domain and lay the groundwork for new continuous streams of ad revenue.

So Google did what the rest of the country could not and went ahead with the project. And the people cheered. Until some others pointed out what was really happening.

So now, in the most recent history, the hero of American and even worldwide book digitization, has been declared a villain as the Google Settlement was struck down in federal court. -- Read More

A Digital Library Better Than Google’s

Op-ed by Robert Darnton in the NYT

ON Tuesday, Denny Chin, a federal judge in Manhattan, rejected the settlement between Google, which aims to digitize every book ever published, and a group of authors and publishers who had sued the company for copyright infringement. This decision is a victory for the public good, preventing one company from monopolizing access to our common cultural heritage.

Nonetheless, we should not abandon Google’s dream of making all the books in the world available to everyone. Instead, we should build a digital public library, which would provide these digital copies free of charge to readers. Yes, many problems — legal, financial, technological, political — stand in the way. All can be solved.

Full piece here

Research Libraries See Google Decision as Just a Bump on the Road

From the Chronicle of Higher Education:
Research Libraries See Google Decision as Just a Bump on the Road to Widespread Digital Access
By Jennifer Howard

Tuesday, a federal judge tossed out the proposed settlement in the lawsuit over Google's vast book-digitization project. Still, research libraries with a stake in that work said they were undeterred. They emphasized that widespread digital access is key to scholars' work, and reiterated their commitment to making as much material available to as many people as possible, whether or not the settlement is revived in some form. And they said they hoped the ruling, by Judge Denny Chin, would galvanize efforts to solve the vexing problem of orphan works, which are under copyright but whose rights-holders are unknown or unfindable......Read the rest here.

Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement

Adding another chapter to a long, drawn-out legal saga, a New York federal district court has rejected the controversial settlement in a class-action suit brought against Google Books by the Authors Guild, a publishing industry trade group.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13577_3-20045967-36.html#ixzz1HMTCX6AE

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