Academic Libraries

Cornell brings nature inside libraries

The grass is always greener, and now so are two of Cornell University’s libraries.

Students from the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis have installed small lawns in the lobbies of Olin and Mann libraries, as well as Duffield Hall and the Physical Sciences Building. The grass is surrounded by potted plants and chairs and, in at least one spot, a plastic caution sign warning students to beware of snakes.
The project was intended to help students relax during one of the most stressful times of the school year.

U Of M bookbinder reaches final chapter after 63 years

Wow!
For more than 63 years, Craven has bound books and conserved artifacts on Michigan's Ann Arbor campus.

On Friday, the 81-year-old Craven leaves campus, retiring as the longest-serving staff member in the university's history.

He began working part-time at the university in 1947 while he was still in high school in a bookbindery in the basement of the Hatcher Graduate Library.

University student who shot himself in library in critical condition

A University High School student who accidentally shot himself inside a library in Orange City is still in the intensive care unit at Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach, a police detective said Friday morning.

Has your Library Gone to the Dogs?

With the recent stories about disasters, legal wrangling, and futurism, let's look at a hands down, slam dunk, win-win idea for libraries: dogs! Many school and public libraries use therapy dogs in their reading programs, calming children to widespread acclaim. Academic libraries also make use of therapy dogs, calming homesick students during finals week. These projects involve minimal costs and have a profound impact. Don't let a lawyer or administrator use absurd logic to deny you this wonderful opportunity to have patrons perceive the library as a comfortable and welcoming atmosphere. And remember: refusing to allow a service animal in to a building is also a violation of federal law. What are your dogs in libraries stories?

Sandy's Devastation...NYU Med School Library Totaled

Reports from my son the NYU Med School student: The Ehrman Medical Library is totally flooded, along with all anatomy and technology labs, lecture halls, radiology equipment, MRIs etc. located at the NYU Langone Medical Center on First Avenue in New York City. Phones and servers too are down and the hospital has been evacuated.

Here is footage of the Dean of the Medical School, Dr. Robert Grossman speaking about the situation.

From their website (not updated yet):
The Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library is the main library of the NYU Langone Medical Center. It supports the Medical Center and the School of Medicine's students and staff in creating a maintaining a world-class patient-centered integrated academic medical center. As one of the NYU Health Sciences Libraries, the Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library enhances learning, research and patient care by managing knowledge-based resources, providing client-centered information services and education, and extending access through new initiatives in information technology.

McGill Librarians announce support of Open Access movement

Good News!

Librarians at McGill are proud to announce their support of the open access movement. McGill librarians are granting the McGill University Library a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to their scholarly articles, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, provided that the works are properly attributed to the authors and not sold for a profit.

Specifically, each librarian grants a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported license for each of his or her scholarly articles. The license will apply to all scholarly articles written while the person is affiliated with the Library except for any articles accepted for publication before the adoption of this policy and any articles for which the librarian entered into an incompatible licensing or assignment agreement before the adoption of this policy.

All such work by McGill librarians will be deposited in the institutional repository, making it freely available online.

The library also supports open access by making available all theses & dissertations through its institutional repository, eScholarship@McGill by digitizing rare and unique titles and making them available to the world through its digital collections, and by supporting the publication of open access journals including CuiZine, and the McGill Journal of Education.

Open Access and its impact on the future of the university librarian

We are shifting from content ownership by individual libraries to joint provision of services on a larger scale, says Stephen Barr... "This change was one which the participants felt that librarians have already embraced and see as an increasingly important role in the future, but it is also one which calls for different practices and perspectives."

Middle East Collection at UCLA

David Hirsch of the Middle East Librarians Association (http://mela.us/) is the subject of an interesting article in UCLC Today.

"His tenacity and love for his work have allowed Hirsch to help build some of the finest collections in the country. The library’s 500,000-plus volumes on the Middle East, North Africa, Anatolia and Central Asia constitute one of the most significant Middle Eastern research collections in the U.S. and the largest on the West Coast. Holdings are particularly strong in Arabic, Persian, Hebrew, Armenian, Ottoman, Modern Turkish, Kurdish, Assyrian and several Central Asian languages. The collection of materials from Yemen and the Persian Gulf countries is considered the most comprehensive in the U.S. The Middle Eastern manuscript holdings are the second largest in North America, with more than 10,000 items in Arabic, Armenian, Hebrew, Assyrian, Ottoman Turkish and Persian."

See: http://today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/david-hirsch-239778.aspx

U. of Maryland Library Gangnam Style

Pretty hip place if you asked me...

Columbia University Gets "X-Men" author Chris Claremont's Notes

For decades, “X-Men” author Chris Claremont kept handwritten notes about characters such as Wolverine and Magneto in dozens of boxes in the closet and basement of his Brooklyn apartment – as well as his mother-in-law’s house.

Perhaps not many outside of the comics fanboy community would consider this ephemera worthy of preservation, since even Mr. Claremont’s wife wanted to “get the crap out of the house,” he said. But Columbia University’s libraries deemed the journals, fan mail and correspondence important enough to be part of its archives.

[Thanks Andrew!]

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