IT Security For Libraries

IT Security For Libraries

Unmasked: An Analysis of 10 Million Passwords

Submitted by Blake on Sun, 09/13/2015 - 15:47

A lot is known about passwords. Most are short, simple, and pretty easy to crack. But much less is known about the psychological reasons a person chooses a specific password. We’ve analyzed the password choices of 10 million people, from CEOs to scientists, to find out what they reveal about the things we consider easy to remember and hard to guess.

From Unmasked: An Analysis of 10 Million Passwords

Ashley Madison, Organizational Doxing, and the End of Online Privacy

Submitted by Blake on Sat, 09/12/2015 - 12:14

Most of us get to be thoroughly relieved that our emails weren't in the Ashley Madison database. But don’t get too comfortable. Whatever secrets you have, even the ones you don’t think of as secret, are more likely than you think to get dumped on the Internet. It's not your fault, and there’s largely nothing you can do about it.

Welcome to the age of organizational doxing.

How To Secure Your Library's Social Media Presence

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 09/07/2015 - 12:35

The ALA lost control of its Facebook page over the weekend so this seems like a pretty good time to review IT Security! Any size small or midsized organization is difficult, if not impossible to secure. It's very easy to overlook things and leave ourselves vulnerable to things like this.

Digital Privacy and Security at ALA Next Week #alaac15

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 06/19/2015 - 07:43

Join Blake Carver from LYRASIS and Alison Macrina from the Library Freedom Project to learn strategies for security from digital surveillance. We'll teach tools that keep data safe inside the library and out -- securing your network, website, and PCs, and tools you can teach to patrons in computer classes. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff.

1 Billion Data Records Stolen in 2014

Submitted by Blake on Sun, 02/15/2015 - 21:56

Data breaches increased 49% with almost 1 billion data records compromised in 1,500 attacks in 2014 – a 78% increase in the number of data records either lost or stolen in 2013, a new report by digital security firm Gemalto said. The Netherlands-based firm said about 575 million records were compromised in 2013.

Identity theft was by far the largest type of attack, with 54% of the breaches involving the theft of personal data, up from 23% in 2013.

How To Defend Yourself Against Hacking On Any Device

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 11/29/2013 - 10:10

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-defend-yourself-against-hacking-o…
If you can plug it in or connect it to a network, your device—no matter what it is—can be harnessed by someone else. And that someone doesn’t have to be a Chinese superhacker to do some serious damage with it, either on purpose or by accident. It can be your Uncle Roger, who doesn’t have his new iPhone figured out and is cluelessly turning your lights on and off via your Belkin WeMo.

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Where? Academic Publishing Scams

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 07/22/2013 - 09:49

Phishing attacks targeting academia aren’t the most high-profile of attacks, though they’re more common than you might think. Student populations in themselves constitute a sizeable pool of potential victims for money mule recruitment and other job scams, in fact anything that promises an easy supplemental income, unfeasibly cheap or free trendy gadgetry, and so on.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #229

Submitted by StephenK on Mon, 01/21/2013 - 00:02

This week's episode looks around the LISHost galaxy while looking at some ambiguous information in a speculative manner.

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