MGM put the entire movie Koyaanisqatsi on YouTube. Because it is an official upload the quality is good.

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Twilight Fever Roaring Through the US

As Harry Potter and his friends ride off into the literary sunset, a young girl and a vampire in love have set off a new round of parties and eagerly anticipated books and movies.

“Twilight,” a movie based on the novel by Stephenie Myers, opens Friday in local theaters. The tale of teenage girl Bella and Edward, the handsome vampire who loves her, has found a wide audience beyond the young adult category. Local libraries have long waiting lists of readers who want to borrow the four book series.

“We had three copies of each of them, and I just bought a fourth copy because the waiting list was so long,” said Director Connie Shumate of the Princeton (WV) Public Library. “I don’t think even Harry Potter matched this. Harry Potter was basically young adult reading, but this is everybody. This is all age groups.”


Saving the Story at MIT

Article in the NY Times about research into how (motion picture) stories have been told, are being told and will be told in the future.

In league with a handful of former Hollywood executives, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Laboratory plans to do something about that on Tuesday, with the creation of a new Center for Future Storytelling.

The center is envisioned as a “labette,” a little laboratory, that will examine whether the old way of telling stories — particularly those delivered to the millions on screen, with a beginning, a middle and an end — is in serious trouble.

Press release from MIT includes the philosophy of the project: "Storytelling is at the very root of what makes us uniquely human," said Frank Moss, Media Lab director and holder of the Jerome Wiesner Professorship of Media Arts and Sciences. "It is how we share our experiences, learn from our past, and imagine our future. But how we tell our stories depends on another uniquely human characteristic -- our ability to invent and harness technology. From the printing press to the Internet, technology has given people new ways to tell their stories, allowing them to reach new levels of creativity and personal fulfillment. The shared vision of the MIT Media Lab and Plymouth Rock Studios allows us to take the next quantum leap in storytelling, empowering ordinary people to connect in extraordinary ways."

Spencer Iowa Paper Reports on the Upcoming Dewey Movie

The hometown heroes, Vicki Myron and the late Dewey Readmore Books are headed for the spotlight. Kind of like Marley & Me.

Here's the Spencer Daily Reporter's story about the upcoming New Line film starring Meryl Streep as Vicki Myron.

That Movie You Got From Netflix That You Haven't Watched? It's Really Angry.

That Movie You Got From Netflix That You Haven't Watched? It's Really Angry.

Video and place for commentary at NPR.

SCOOP: Dewey's Life to Become a Film

Big story!!!!

Dewey Readmore Books's (a library cat who lived at the Spencer Library from 1988 to his death in 2006) story, recently published as a book will become a movie!, and Dewey's adopted mother, librarian Vicki Myron, who has since retired from the Spencer (IA) Library will be played by the great Meryl Streep!!! It is not known who will be cast as Dewey...

The movie's working title is "Library Cat", here's the scoop from Variety. (I feel a little like Liz Smith today)!

'The Hollywood Librarian' Shown on the Other Side of the Pond

Ann Seidl's 'Hollywood Librarian' is being shown to the public at Napier University in Edinburgh...from The Scotsman:

"Using the entertaining and appealing context of American movies, the film holds surprises for people who may think they know what librarians do.

Professor Alistair McCleery, director of the Scottish Centre for the Book, said: "The Hollywood Librarian is inspirational in the stories it tells of dedicated professionals at odds with some of their cinema stereotypes."

Librarian documentary to begin DVD sales on website

The Hollywood Librarian: A Look at Librarians Through Film today launched sales of the DVD version at its website,

The feature length documentary, which premiered in Washington D.C. in June 2007 and has been screened in 13 countries, can now be ordered by customers in the U.S. and Canada, with international ordering to begin soon. The DVD will begin shipping in December.

The DVD contains the 96 minute film. plus such bonus features as extended interviews, deleted scenes, behind-the-scenes production photos, subtitling in Spanish and French, closed captioning for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in English, and more.

Two versions of the DVD are on sale now at the website: the standard retail version for $39.95 and a Public Performance Rights (PPR) version with limited performance rights to show the movie in public and educational settings for $289.95.

Film International calls the documentary “a deft weaving” and “a hopeful elegy …a well-reasoned, eloquent, and enjoyable argument for the continued importance of libraries in the modern democracy.” And The Edmonton Journal wrote that The Hollywood Librarian is “Entertaining, uplifting and educational, it's everything a good documentary should be.”

The film was written, produced and directed by Ann Seidl, and is being distributed by Bifolkal Productions, a non-profit organization in Madison, Wisconsin. Bifolkal produces terrific program ideas and resources for libraries planning reminiscence programs with older adults; check out their website.

Five Books That Need To Be Adapted Into Movies Like Right Now

Five Books That Need To Be Adapted Into Movies Like Right Now: "Hollywood is unoriginal. We all know this. A study was recently conducted that proved that Hollywood is the second most unoriginal thing in the world (the first being Hollywood’s slightly retarded Hindi cousin Bollywood). Nowadays, nearly every new movie is either a remake or an adaptation of a book. I won’t complain. After all, tons of amazing movies are adaptations. That said, there are some books that, for some reason unknown to me, still haven’t been adapted. Following are five that need to be adapted two days before tomorrow."


Which films are better than the books they are based on?

The New Zealand Herald Asked Can a film be better than the book? It doesn't happen often - but there are some great examples. Many say that the Oscar-nominated film Brokeback Mountain was better than the Annie Proulx short-story it came from.

Which films are better than the books they are based on?



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