Employment & Work Stories

Analyzing a good Net career

Tired of sitting on the reference desk? Had enough of
cutter numbers?
Well. maybe you should think about becoming a
Web data analyst. This Story
says the current lack of brainpower available to interpret
Web data means demand for analytic talent far
outweighs supply—by at least 2-to-1. That means even
enterprises willing to shell out big bucks for qualified
analysts will have trouble finding them.

Attributes needed for the job include statistical skills, IT
savvy and project management experience.

Shortage of librarians plagues library boom

Good news, Los Angeles has built five libraries and doesn\'t have enough librarians to work in the buildings.
They say it is not only a local problem. Nationally, the supply of librarians is falling far short of the rising demands. About 22% of the nation\'s 191,000 librarians will turn 65 in the next decade.
There were 1,000 openings at the ALA, but only 481 job-seekers showed up. Hopefully that means salaries will start to go up, and I won\'t have any problem finding a new job!
LA Times.com has The Story

\"The new librarian is really a swinging person, because he or she can manage information and that\'s an incredible skill in today\'s world. I mean, who among us hasn\'t done an Internet search and gotten 5,486 hits?But a librarian knows how to find that precise bit of information you need.\"

The New Economy and the Amazon.com unionization effort

This article by by Jonathan Cohn in the New Republic is an entertaining look at a serious topic - the nature of the New Economy, particularly at Amazon.com, where the workers are attempting to unionize in response to a changing corporate culture, and attempting to return the company to the cooperative atmosphere that the workers there enjoyed in the first years.

\"As an employee,\" Alan Barclay writes, \"any illusions I might have had about the nobility of Amazon.com have been shattered.\"

Life On Survivor Island

I wish I had watched \"Survivor\" more often. Maybe I
could understand how it felt to be the last man on the
island, I could use more references to the show, maybe
use more inside jokes that only the people who watch
that show would understand to help me with this
story. I am happy to report I\'m still on the
\"dot.com\" survivor island, no one has voted me off, and
I haven\'t packed up my gear and gone home of my free
will (I\'m still hoping that\'s how this one will end).
As some of you may know I work at a small (and
getting smaller) dot.com startup. You\'ve probably
noticed that all the news stories on the dot.com world
has been focused on layoffs lately, and this one will be
no different.

LISJobs Info Career Trends

If you\'ve never been over to LISJobs.com and had a look at all Rachel has done there, you\'re really missing out. Be sure to check out Info Career Trends (January 1, 2001 Issue), the electronic
newsletter for information professionals interested in developing
their own careers. If you are looking for a job, or just want to keep up on what\'s going on, it\'s a great resource.
Rachel\'s new book \"Teaching the Internet In Libraries\", has just been released by ALA Editions as well!

Information Experts in the Info Age

Information Experts in the Information Age is the name of a report from the Labor Department\'s \"Occupational Outlook
Quarterly\". They have many kind things to say about librarians and the work we do.

It\'s a PDF so you\'ll need Acrobat.

\"

Who Organizes The Web?

Webgrrls.com has a rather interesting Story on the library profession.

\"Having abandoned the \"book ghetto\" and the image of glasses and hair buns, librarians have commercialized on their ability to manage knowledge and information. Today\'s librarians are more commonly known as cybrarians, content managers, information specialists, and knowledge engineers. \"

E-Mail Makes the World Go \'Round

Computers In Libraries has a nice Story by D. Scott Brandt on the use of eMail in libraries. He talks about how librarians use eMail to make friends and help patrons.

\"E-mail technology really enables librarians to have all sorts of relationships with patrons from around the world.\"

The Revenge of the Library Scientist

I like this opening line from This Story at Online Inc.

\"Much like the work of aircraft mechanics, library scientists don\'t get enough respect.\"

Before you jump all over them for saying \"library scientist\" instead of \"librarian\" give the article a read. It is very complimentary to librarians, of course there are pleanty of other reasons to jump on them:

\"There\'s a lot of insecurity among librarians about what they know that other people don\'t. The truth is that non-librarians often believe they can find and organize information.\"

Should Librarians Help Support Masturbation?

Kell Yusuf writes \"...the question seems answered by a recent Rosensweig email in the affirmative.
Given his official ALA association, that\'s the only inference to be made when he writes:

\"`masturbation,\' for example, is not a vice: it\'s a normal sexual outlet and it should be actively described as such to children and they should be taught about it by trained professionals! That\'s pedagogically and medically sound. That\'s in the best interests of the child. We should, to put it bluntly, be sex-positive, in favor of sex education, of providing information about abortion...\" and \"...ALA [should] find allies in the educational profession, in the legal profession, among politicians, in the social work and child development profession...\"

Why not be more blunt or go further? Let\'s recruit librarians to actively locate and collect net porno and train children to find it on the net to support their sexual curiosity and thus encourage them to use this material for jerkin\' off. What better way to support our allies on these other professions? The full text of his email missive is dated Oct. 11, 2000, a more recent one than the email from him posted before at:
worldnetdaily.com \"

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