International

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #154

This week's episode brings an essay about a new attempt at fracturing the Internet which will otherwise alter the knowledge ecology. More than oil emanates from the Middle East. A microblog feed has been instituted for items from the slush pile that do not otherwise make it to air. You can find such on Twitter at ELPPILE and on Identica at ELPSLUSH. Related links: Radio Netherlands Worldwide Media Network blog highlighting Iran's attempt to fracture the Internet Internet luminary Dave Winer on Iran's attempt to fracture the Internet Wall Street Journal on Iran's attempt to fracture the Internet Nova: The Cuban take on Linux CIA World Factbook on Cuba CIA World Factbook on Iran CIA World Factbook on raw amounts of Internet users ranked by nation-state

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Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #154 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Polish Librarians...Check Out "Pullover" (Pulowerek.pl)

Pulowerek.pl is the "different" Polish website for librarians....named after a characteristic part of stereotypical librarian uniform (cardigan-vest). Our idea is simple: bring maximum entertainment, maximum fun, maximum auto-irony to the dusty world of professional bookworms.

Librarians Without Borders on the Ground in Guatemala: The Asturias Library Project

27 members of Librarians Without Borders (LWB) are currently on the ground on a service learning trip to Guatemala, from April 22 - May 3, 2011. This is part of a partnership with the Miguel Angel Asturias Academy, a non-profit private school founded in 1994 to eliminate education disparities through subsidized tuition and create informed, critically-thinking, socially conscious citizens through its curriculum.

The partnership between LWB and Asturias is focused on promoting literacy and libraries in Guatemala, and development and operation of the Asturias Community Library. As part of this trip, the group will learn about Guatemalan culture and education, participate in community organizing and change making workshops, and complete a week of work at the Asturias Academy and Community Library.

Dutch Book Week

It's Dutch Book Week, and the focus is on (auto)biographies. Ann Frank is shown above (pretty amazing!). From Behance.net:

Each year CPNB (Collective Promotion Dutch Literature) organises the Dutch Book Week to promote Dutch literature. And every year a specific genre is being profiled. This year the(auto) biography is featured. This is translated in the theme ‘GeschrevenPortretten’, which translates in Written Portraits’. Van Wanten Etcetera created the campaign, which show the different faces behind the (auto) biographies. Anne Frank, Vincent van Gogh, Louis van Gaal and Kader Abdollah (writer of the biographic Book Week give away). Souverein made the artwork and did an amazing job creating realistic images. Even original book pages were used for the text inside the portraits to get right structure for each portrait.

United Kingdom Public Libraries Face Legal Threat

The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals has a press release out noting that the legal duty for local authorities to maintain libraries in the United Kingdom may be under threat. This was brought about by a deregulatory push by the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government's Department of Communities and Local Governments to seek comment on the over one thousand mandates by central government upon local authorities in the UK. CILIP President Brian Hall is urging members of that organization to contribute their views to the review being undertaken by the department.

Photos of Stricken Japanese Libraries

Library staffers and patrons across Japan sent in photos and reports. From Galley Cat: If you want to help, the Authors for Japan site just launched yesterday, as writers and publishing professionals have donated some great prizes to raise funds for earthquake and tsunami relief in Japan. We also created a Twitter list of writers living in Japan. Also, here's disaster relief information from the Japanese version of Save the Libraries

En Route To or From Taiwan? Borrow an e-book at the Airport

From PC World: Taiwan's international airport has opened what it calls the world's first in-transit e-library, offering 400 e-book titles to ease waiting-hall boredom while showcasing the island's high-tech capabilities. More info on the library's offerings at China Post.

The e-library at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport allows passengers to consult the Chinese and English-language books, and around 2,000 books on paper, in a special waiting area in the larger of the airport's two terminals. The terminal commonly handles stopovers between North America and Southeast Asia.

The e-books are stored on around 30 devices, a mix of iPads and e-readers with e-ink screens. The e-books are stored in the ePub and Zinio formats. The airport is loaning out the devices on a first come first served basis. Passengers can't download the books to their own e-reader, limiting the usefulness of the service.

The duty-free shop manages the library, which was proposed by Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou. The shop worked with Taiwan's government-funded Institute for Information Industry and the project cost more than NT$3 million (US$102,000).

Growing Knowledge: The British Library launches its strategy for 2011-2015

Always interesting reading....

The British Library has launched its new strategy, setting out how it plans to develop its collections and services over the next four years.

Growing Knowledge: The British Library’s Strategy 2011-2015 outlines the UK national library’s key objectives and strategic priorities to the middle of the decade, and emphasizes the need to deliver more for less in a challenging economic climate.

Egypt's Jewel Of A Library Reopens, Thanks To Demonstrators

Story from NPR about the reopening of the Library of Alexandria. It was closed for the last few weeks during the demonstrations, both to protect it from vandalism, and to protest the army's curfew.

And the library's director, Ismail Serageldin says that in all the protests, not a stone was thrown at the library, and not a pane of glass was broken.

"What happened was pure magic," he says. "People from within the demonstrations broke out of the demonstrations and simply linked hands, and they said 'This is our library. Don't touch it.'"

The ancient library has been destroyed several times by vandals and conquerors — most notably by a fire, several centuries ago.

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