Journals & Magazines

U. of California Tries Just Saying No to Rising Journal Costs

Sarah G. pointed the way to U. of California Tries Just Saying No to Rising Journal Costs
The University of California system has said "enough" to the Nature Publishing Group, one of the leading commercial scientific publishers, over a big proposed jump in the cost of the group's journals.

Survey on Library Publishing Opportinities

I am toying with the idea of starting up a new professional journal for people in the library world, but I'd like to get some feedback on the idea. I have created a short online survey (under 10 questions!), and I'd really appreciate it if you people out there in library land (library students and paraprofessionals are emphatically welcome to participate) would spare some time to take it. Thanks -- and please feel free to pass this survey along.

Click here to take survey

Cites & Insights June 2010 available

Cites & Insights 10:7 (June 2010) is now available.
The 34-page issue is, as usual, PDF; each essay is also available as an HTML separate

(just click on the links, or use the highly sophisticated notational scheme, http://citesandinsights.info/vNiMx.htm, where N is the volume (10), M is the issue (7), and x is a lower-case letter indicating the article, starting with a, then b, then c...)

What's Here
Bibs & Blather...pp. 1-3

Announcing the new book Open Access and Libraries: Essays from Cites & Insights, 2001-2009, a 519-page 6x9 book combining all OA-related essays from C&I--free as a PDF, minimally priced ($17.50) as a trade paperback. Also a note on ALA and my rehearsals for [semi-?]retirement.

The Zeitgeist: There is No Future...pp. 3-19

You could think of this as a Making it Work Perspective on library futures, if you prefer--focusing on exclusionary vs. inclusionary thinking (OR vs. AND), The Future vs. many futures...and more.

Feedback and Following Up...pp. 19-20

Finally (and probably having missed some feedback), a little feedback--three items in all. -- Read More

The Open Access citation advantage?

advantage, schmantage "Who loses the shell game? Academics whose work is less widely available than it should be, and anyone who wants to read the primary literature. Who wins? Publishers, whose prices have been allowed to escalate because they have largely escaped scrutiny (except by librarians, who for no good reason that I can see have been largely ignored, at least until relatively recently, by academic and political decision makers). "

Cites & Insights 10:6 available

Cites & Insights 10:6, May 2010, is now available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ10i6.pdf

The 32-page issue, PDF as usual, consists of two essays, each available separately in HTML form (click on the essay title):
Making it Work - Generations (pp. 1-11)

Lots of commentary about generation generalizations (gengen) and lots of commentary full of gengen--plus some discussions of cases where age, technology and culture really may interact.

Old Media/New Media (pp. 11-32)

Yes, it's been almost two years; no, I didn't give up on this theme. This roundup comes in three parts: Media in general (and specific media other than books, magazines and newspapers); magazines and periodicals (which are overlapping, not concentric, circles); and newspapers.

This issue is sponsored by the Library Society of the World, a sponsorship that will continue through June or July...after which, I'm very much looking for sponsorship.

Regular readers of Walt at Random may have noticed that I reviewed the final disc in the five-disc Spaghetti Westerns set. So why isn't there an Offtopic Perspective in this issue? Because I wanted two "real" perspectives and didn't want a 40-page issue...look for it in a later issue.

Honorary Chair of National Library Week, Neil Gaiman, on Libraries

Neil Gaiman has long been on record as a fan of libraries, sometimes even calling himself a “feral child” raised by librarians among the stacks. So it should come as no surprise that the American Library Association chose Gaiman to be the Honorary Chair of this year’s National Library Week. As both a librarian and a fan of Gaiman, I was thrilled to be able to interview him about National Library Week and what libraries have meant to him. Interview w/Gaiman by Book Page's Kate Pritchard.

Pulitzers Are Announced

The Washington Post won four Pulitzer Prizes on Monday for its work in 2009, and The New York Times won three, while ProPublica became the first of the new breed of online, nonprofit news organizations to win the most prestigious award in print journalism.

The prize for public service went to the tiny Bristol Herald Courier of southwestern Virginia, circulation 29,000, for revealing that many energy companies failed to pay required royalties on natural gas drilling, and that the royalties that were paid were not reaching the local people who deserved them.

Paul Harding won the fiction prize for his novel “Tinkers,” while the drama award went to the musical “Next to Normal,” with music by Tom Kitt and book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey.

More from NY Times.

Announcing the LISNews Bulletin

The LISNews Bulletin has just been transmitted to the location of our printing partner closest to the venue of Computers in Libraries 2010. Blake will have 125 copies available to him to distribute at the conference for free. I want to thank our patrons for their generous financial support in allowing the Bulletin to be distributed at no charge.

There will be artwork. We've got an excerpt from a Cleveland-area artist's memoirs about life in India in the 1990s. The owner of Erie Looking Productions offered up a "quick hit" piece from Tech for Techies never heard before on the podcast streams. This issue may be small but it is intended to be a tasty appetizer for a larger serial that might perhaps follow.

If you are not going to be attending the conference, you can still get a copy of the publication. Please contact the publisher, Producer Gloria Kellat, at mrsnicelunchlady@yahoo.com with your physical address so we can determine if our printing partner has an office near you. If there is, it will cost about USD$2.00 to have a special "RetCon" copy printed for you to pick up. If there isn't, we'll discuss options with you.

New Owner for Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly has been acquired by PWxyz, LLC, a newly formed company headed by one-time PW publisher George Slowik. The acquisition includes the Web site publishersweekly.com and Publishers Weekly Show Daily. The new company will retain all of PW's editorial, art, and advertising employees and the magazine will remain headquartered in New York City. Cevin Bryerman will stay as publisher with Jim Milliot and Michael Coffey serving as co-editors. Slowik ran PW in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading the publication to record profits despite a poor economy. John Poulin, CEO of PW's former owner Reed Business Information, said, "Given George's history with Publishers Weekly, we believe this will be a great match."

New York Times Roulette

Fun app to get to a random NYT news article from the last 24 hours. And from the same person, a random hit on the U.K.'s Guardian website.

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