Authors

Famous author interviews

Wired for Books has begun to encode the Don
Swaim collection of author interviews and is making them available on the
Web in RealAudio. In the 1970s, 80s, and early 90s, most of the best of
American authors (and a few from other countries, as well) found their way
to Don Swaim\'s New York radio studio.


We expect to have several hundred of these interviews online within a year.
Now, we have interviews of Allen Ginsberg, Joseph Heller, James Jones,
Louis L\'Amour, William Manchester, and William Styron. Let us know what you
think.


Wired for Books is an educational, noncommercial project of the Ohio
University Telecommunications Center.

Audio Author Interviews

For many years, most of the best American writers
found their way to Don Swaim\'s New York radio studio.
Listen in on these classic behind-the-scene
conversations here in RealAudio. They include:


Louis L\'Amour, playwrights Ed Bullins and Sherry
Kramer, Allen Ginsberg, Joseph Heller, Dave Smith,
Herbert Woodward Martin, and many others.

Check them out at Wired for
Books
.

Loyal King Fans Pay Extra

Someone sent in a cnn.com Story on \"The Plant\". It seems some readers have been paying extra money -- in $2, $10 and even $20 -- to make up for less honorable readers who downloaded the files without paying. King won\'t finish the book without enough folks paying, so the fans hope to tip the scales.

\"As it is, some 76 percent of readers are volunteering to pay the $1 King is asking for each copy -- just above the amount King says he wants for the project to continue -- so the project appears set to continue for now.\"

Stephen King Appears In Public


Yahoo.com has a brief Article about Stephen King talking to the public again.

\"It\'s nice to be here,\" King said to about 300 people gathered at the Bowery Ballroom.\" Actually, it\'s nice to be anywhere. King claimed to be nervous for his self-proclaimed coming-out party.\"   -- Read More

Success of Harry Potter

CNN News.com had a article about the success of Harry Potter books. The author is still very amazed and in disbelief. Here is what she had to say in a short article.

\"Rowling, the rags-to-riches British writer whose series on a schoolboy wizard has enthralled children across the world, has had fans lining up for hours in the rain on a tumultuous tour of the eastern United States.

It\'s as if she\'s a rock star or all-star athlete. \"Can you imagine what that\'s like, to get out of a car at a normal book signing and there\'s a thousand people outside screaming at you? It\'s amazing,\" she said.\"   -- Read More

America\'s most popular poem

Two years ago, poet laureate Robert Pinsky launched a campaign to discover American\'s favorite poem. He received nearly 18,000 written, videotaped and recorded suggestions, and has found the most popular one -- Robert Frost\'s \"The Road Not Taken.\"

Pinsky presented some of the results from his project Monday to the Library of Congress for its archives: 100 video and audio recordings of Americans from all walks of life reading their favorite verses. -- Read More

Sylvia Plath Journals To Be Printed

Everyone will finally know the real Silvia Plath.

The diaries, which are being serialized in London\'s The Guardian newspaper this week, provide new details about Plath and her turbulent marriage to British poet Ted Hughes. Plath gassed herself in her kitchen at the age of 30 a few months after Hughes left her for another woman.
After Plath\'s death,Ted Hughes maintained control over her journals and permitted only a much-edited version to be published in 1982. The couple\'s children are now permitting publication of the complete diaries.

\'\'The Journals of Sylvia Plath,\'\' will be published on April 3. You can read about the at booksunlimited.co.uk

A look at author Tom Robbins

CNN has a nice long look at Author Tom Robbins HERE

The story covers his life story, and goes into depth on his books and fans. Even a serious Robbins fan might learn a thing or two from this one. -- Read More

Sell out with me

This NYTimes story has an interesting take on how authors jump to big publishers after hiting it big. They usually move on to big publishers for more money, and job security.

There are authors who have gone from large to much smaller houses, although most of the time the author who hits it big with a first book published by a small house feels the need for the security and the money that the bigger house provides. So in book publishing, it\'s not a gauche or even stupid to go home from the dance with a stranger.

Charles Schulz Dead

CNN has a nice tribute to the late Charles Schulz
Here, along with Message Boards to discuss his death with other fans.


The last daily Peanuts strip was published on January 3. But
Sunday\'s papers carried the final cartoon, a strip showing
Snoopy at his typewriter, along with other Peanuts regulars.
It includes a farewell letter signed by Schulz.

\"Dear Friends,\" the letter opens. \"I have been fortunate to
draw Charlie Brown and his friends for almost 50 years. It
has been the fulfillment of my childhood ambition.\"


\"It\'s amazing that he dies just before his last strip is
published,\" fellow cartoonist Lynn Johnston, creator of \"For Better or Worse,\" said. Such an ending was \"as if he had written it that way.\"

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