Librarians

Librarians take legal battle against library closures to government

“We’ve had enough. We’ve marked our line in the sand here. The government is behaving as if it doesn’t have a duty of care and they do, under the law. We think it’s time to be clear about what that means,” said Nick Poole, the chief executive of Cilip, after it was announced that more than 100 library branches were shut last year, and as further branches up and down the UK face closure.

From Librarians take legal battle against library closures to government | Books | The Guardian

Looking Back: the biggest changes in Librarianship this year

As we approach the end of 2015, we asked our Library book series editors Paul T. Jaeger, John Carlo Bertot and Samantha Hines to summarize the biggest changes in Librarianship this year and what they predict to be the main changes during 2016.

From Emerald | Looking Back, Looking Ahead with Jaeger, Bertot and Hines

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Video of Josh Hanagame of the Salt Lake City Library

KUER's VideoWest/RadioWest's intro to the video Ties the Room Together. "Josh Hanagarne is a writer and a librarian in Salt Lake City who's written beautifully about his experiences with Tourette syndrome. We had him on RadioWest to talk about his 2013 book The World's Strongest Librarian. We want to thank Josh for letting us tag along and pry into his life."

Here's a photo of Josh holding an "In My Book, you're quite a character" card in the beautiful SLCPL .

Shipping is free during December, visit www.inmybook.com for more details.

"Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language

There are some words out there that are brilliantly evocative and at the same time impossible to fully translate. Yiddish has the word shlimazl, which basically means a perpetually unlucky person. German has the word Backpfeifengesicht, which roughly means a face that is badly in need of a fist. And then there’s the Japanese word tsundoku, which perfectly describes the state of my apartment. It means buying books and letting them pile up unread.

From "Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language | Open Culture

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Making Openness My Business

I am still getting daily lessons on what it means to be an advocate for and practitioner of openness. Before I started my professional career I didn't recognize the perseverance needed, or the political savvy, or the tenacity of trusting your gut when it tells you that what you are doing is worth the worry that you are faced with a Sisyphean task well beyond your abilities. If you take anything away from this, know that you do not have to be a researcher to be an important advocate for openness, nor do you have to be an expert in the many facets of openness.

From The Winnower | Making Openness My Business

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Andrew Carnegie, Librarian

Andrew Carnegie died in 1919, and I became a librarian in 2012. In many ways, Carnegie’s idea of the library still affects my working life today, as it does many others in the library profession. With a staggering largess, Carnegie conspired to shape the library—both physically and professionally—into a service model of dull efficiency and grinding productivity, thereby transforming the library according to his own capitalist view of industry and labor. The thousands of Carnegie libraries scattered across the US stand as a testament both to his dictatorial generosity and to his crushing vision of higher education as workforce development. In this post, I take a brief look at Andrew Carnegie and the connection points among his philanthropy, the library profession, and the anti-intellectual pro-business forces at work in today’s higher education.

From Andrew Carnegie, Librarian — Scott W. H. Young

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A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Little wonder this extraordinary man has continually fascinated and served as inspiration to artists from Shakespeare and Ben Johnson to Derek Jarman and Damon Albarn.

Now, the intriguing and mysterious Dee, who survived the machinations of the late Tudor period only to die in poverty in 1608/9, is to be revealed to the public through his remarkable personal library for the first time in history.

From A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed | Culture24

Jessamyn West, Technology Lady

Let me just start by saying that Jessamyn West is kind of internet famous. She was one of the original moderators for the community blog Metafilter, which is like the civilized version of Reddit. She was recently contacted by the White House for her thoughts on their choice for the next Librarian of Congress. And she speaks internationally about the digital divide. Talking with Jessamyn is a little like being on a really fast ride at the Tunbridge Fair. In this interview, we sat in her kitchen in Randolph, Vermont, and talked about her passion for public libraries and the role of the modern librarian. We also talked about how different people manage their personal relationships with their personal computers. Welcome.

From Jessamyn West, Technology Lady — Medium

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