Librarians

Russell Shank dies at 86; former head librarian at UCLA

Russell Shank was an early proponent of automating library services and a fervent supporter of 1st amendment rights in libraries. He was a past president of the American Library Assn.

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Lost in the Stacks Hits the Big Time

Brooklyn librarian band "Lost in the Stacks", including LISNews author Rita Meade, had a lovely mention in the New York Daily News yesterday.

Fact Check - The $227,000 Librarian

A one minute twelve second intensive research project on the $227,00 librarian pension revealed some interesting things.

Of course, the claim is startling; the annual pension for a four-star general: $149,000. The pension for a San Diego city librarian: $227,000.

Full article

“Libraries need to admit that we suck at search and get over it”

"Libraries are metadata specialists and many librarians are metadata search specialists. Our training for users too often tries to turn them into mini-librarians too, as though being a specialist at finding things in the library is or should be a crowning achievement in life. So I really do think libraries are NOT experts at search. In fact, compared to Google I think we pretty much suck at it. I also think most librarians are specialists rather than experts at search. But what I don’t understand is why this seems to be such a challenge to librarians."

http://carolbycomputerlight.wordpress.com/2012/07/05/the-difference-between-an-expert-and-a-specialist/

This has shades of "Reference is dead" posts (here , here , here, here etc) and "Libraries need to give up the notion that question answering is a core service of the library" -- Read More

Checking out

Books
Checking Out

January 30, 2012 | by Avi Steinberg

Porn books and librarians have always had a passionate, mutually defining relationship—it was, in fact, a prudish French librarian in the early nineteenth century who coined the word pornography. So it comes as no surprise that the sexy librarian, a fixture of the pornographic imagination, is most at home in books. Each year, new titles are added to the librarian-porn bookshelf. This past season’s crop included additions like Hot for Librarian by Anastasia Carrera; Lucy the Librarian—Dewey and His Decimal by John and Shauna Michaels; The Nympho Librarian and Other Stories by Chrissie Bentley and Jenny Swallows; A Librarian’s Desire by Ava Delaney, author of the Kinky Club series; and soft-core selections like Sweet Magik by Penny Watson. The conventions of the form—the dimly lit stacks, the librarian’s mask of thick glasses and hair tied into a bun, et cetera—are, of course, well known. Unlike video porn, where these conventions are typically used as a wholesale substitute for narrative, porn books still feel the compulsion to tell a story, to make the glasses and bun mean something. I was curious just what story these new books were telling. What does our most current version of the librarian fantasy say about us? To answer this question, I visited the library.

Continues here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/01/30/checking-out/

What They're Wearing at the NYPL

This Wall Street Journal blog makes note of what New York City librarians are wearing these days. Turns out it's a little bit of everything. The report includes an interactive slide show.

Shauntee Burns, a teaching and learning specialist, said: “I definitely like to look like a librarian, but I twist it with a pop of color, so it’s 21st-century librarian.” Jessica Pigza, assistant curator of rare books, added a homespun touch to her librarian look: She sewed her dress and wore it with a vintage shirt and black-frame glasses.

Employees involved in fundraising or special events—such as the “Live from the NYPL” speaker series, which features celebrity speakers like Jay-Z, Umberto Eco and Oliver Stone—tend to dress more formally.

Patrick Hoffman, director of the theatre on film and tape at the library for the performing arts, wears a suit and tie every day. “I’m a firm believer that good clothes open all doors,” he said.

Stoop Stories: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn With Librarian Rita Meade

Stoop Stories: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn With Librarian Rita Meade
It’s one thing to work or live in a community. It’s another to really be a part of it. Rita Meade, the children’s librarian at the New Utrecht Library at 1743 86th Street, doesn’t just occupy her daytime hours there; she really loves and gives to her branch and community.

She is a member of Community Board 10 and speaks at Board 10 meetings in order to secure support for the local libraries, plays in an all-librarian rock band and encourages our youth to read novels like War and Peace. All in all, she’s pretty cool.

Check out this week’s Stoop Stories and after, go and support your local libraries!

Supreme Librarians in Metaspace

New SLIM Comic Takes Librarians into Metaspace
SLIM is proud to unveil a marketing resource aimed at generating newfound excitement for librarianship and increasing the awareness of the many opportunities that an MLS degree can provide. From the same team that created Library of the Living Dead and Monster Clash, Supreme Librarians in Metaspace is a promotional comic that highlights the many facets of librarianship in a quirky, tongue-in-cheek manner. We hope that this resource will encourage prospective and current SLIM students, alumni, and librarians around the world to take a look at the profession in a new light. And maybe have a laugh or two while doing it. You can view the comic here.

Have YOU Voted for your Favorite Library Blog?

Here's where to cast your vote in the Salem Press (a Division of EBSCO) Independent and Institutional Library Blogs of 2012 contest. Categories are general, academic, public, special, school and 'quirky.' LISNews obviously covers too many categories and is not among the choices.

Vote for your favorite blog (one per category) by checking the appropriate box. Voting closes June 17th.

Librarian, Distressed

Librarian, Distressed
"When I read Stephen Akey’s piece on Philip Larkin recently in The Millions, I knew I’d found a fellow clerk. Akey, it turned out, had a thematic, albeit totally non-personal, connection with Larkin: they were both librarians. Further, they were distressed librarians; librarians that perhaps wished not to be anymore, but still found themselves drawn to the work anyhow."

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