Libraries

Try and Circulate This!!

Magazine publishers such as Forbes and Wired are going to placing barcodes in their magazines with which users will scan (with a device known as the CueCat) to bring up related web sites. The article appeared in the Washington Post.\"
Forbes magazine last week shipped its 810,000 subscribers a new computer gadget it hopes will turn its pages into a new form of hyperlink to the Internet, as part of an experiment aimed at bridging the divide between old and new media.\" -- Read More

Library in a cartoon museum?

Ben Ostrowsky writes:

The city of
Boca Raton,
Florida,
is considering
moving
their library

into the
International Museum of
Cartoon Art
.
It sounds cool, but the main reason offered is that it
would benefit the
failing museum. There\'s not enough parking and
there\'s not enough room,
but hey, anything to save a museum, right?

\"They told me in the beginning a long time ago that they
needed 70,000
square feet, and we don\'t have nearly enough,\"
[museum founder Mort
Walker] said, pointing out that the museum has 55,000
square feet.

It is not just the books

Sometimes it\'s not just the selection of books that brings kids into the library. As this article from the Tampa Tribune explains, it may be the appearance of the library itself.\"But it wasn\'t the books that added the sparkle - it was the bright, welcoming lighting. And the shiny new shelves, the spotless circulation desk, the chairs with nary a pencil gouge nor wad of gum stuck underneath.\" -- Read More

The instant library

The Detroit Free
Press
has a typical story on how great the web is
for education.

\"Students say it\'s easier to do research on the
Internet than in the library, where they say they have to
struggle with confusing reference cards and outdated
books. Parents also don\'t have to worry about taking
their kids to the library. \" -- Read More

A Political Economy of Librarianship?

Here is an excerpt from the hard-to-categorize (here) A Political Economy of Librarianship?\" by William Birdsall, in the new issue of Hermès: Revue Critique:


No profession concerned with the administration of a public institution, such as the library, can ignore the need to pursue serious research into the politico-economic sphere of public policy. Understanding the enduring link between economics and politics is crucial to understanding the current political realm of librarianship. Achieving this understanding is the reason for the need to develop a political economy of librarianship. Currently, the primary attention librarians give to politics and economics is political advocacy for the purpose of generating enhanced funding of libraries. Such advocacy is admittedly very important and librarians have become increasingly sophisticated at doing it. However, I assert that librarians need to devote more effort researching the political and economic dynamics that define the past and current environment of libraries. Libraries are the creation and instrument of public policy derived from political processes. Understanding these processes includes appreciating the connection between the polity and the economy. This connection between the polity and economy defines the political realm of the library and the basis for this paper’s claim that there is a need to develop a political economy of librarianship.

Something new at the library

The King County Library System in Washington is trying something new to attract youngsters. Multicolored library cards. The article appeared in the East Side Journal.
``I don\'t know of any library in the country that has tried anything like this,\'\' said Bill Ptacek, director of the King County Library System. ``The idea is for people to individualize how they access the library. We are the `People\'s University,\' and many things to many people.\'\' -- Read More

African-American Research Library

The Denver Post has a Story on plans for a new library in Denver that will house a growing collection of documents related to African-Americans in CO.

\"We focused really hard on getting African-American political people first,\" Nelson said. \"But community people are very important also. Just the everyday folks, because they have the real nuts and bolts of things. We know the high-visibility people have done a lot. But the community people are very important to us too.\"

Do libraries even exist anymore?

The San Fransisco Gate has this to say about kids doing research. First the New York Times, now this? Do we need to educate the public more, or what?\"

Rated

Michigan Live has a decent Story on the ol\' R-Rated Video checkout debate. They do a good job covering both sides of the issue. Should libraries \"rent\" R-Rated videos to Kids? If they can\'t do it at Blockbuster why should they be able to do it at a library?

\"Libraries exist to provide a window to the world. How far open the window should be is a matter of debate -- and it\'s not a new one.\" -- Read More

Choosing Quick Hits Over the Card Catalog

Steven Bell writes:Here is a story I think every
librarian should read on student use of the
Internet for research. It\'s at The NY TImes


This is an intersting story to say the least. Filled with
quotes to make a point, and few facts, the author leads
us to believe kids hate libraries. The \"card catalog\" is
cited as an example of how students are \" more
comfortable sifting through hyperlinks than they are
flipping through a card catalog. \" Don\'t most
schools use an OPAC now?

\"Sam still prefers doing research with his
Hewlett-Packard PC to looking up information at the
library. \"I\'d much rather be online,\" he said. The library,
he added, is \"a tenser atmosphere.\" -- Read More

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