Libraries

First Stack Books, Then Open Library

If there is one thing we all learned in library school, it was that we should have all the books on the shelves before we open a new library. According to this story from the Daily Star, one library forgot this golden rule.\"The country’s first large-scale public library has been unofficially opened ­ at least one month before being ready to receive visitors.
Although thousands of books still need to be laminated, catalogued and shelved, the Beirut Municipality officially opened the library, which is located at the Basta-Bashoura Fire Department, on Sunday evening.\" -- Read More

Internet in New Zealand Libraries Should Not Be Free

New Zealand taxpayers were mighty upset when they found out that tourists are able to check their e-mail at the national library for free. Computer User has the full story.\"New Zealand Member of Parliament (MP) Winston Peters lashed out at Wellington\'s National Library of New Zealand, painting its provision of free Internet access as an invitation for unrestricted surfing of porn sites and a free Net cafe for foreigners to check e-mail at taxpayers\' expense.\" -- Read More

Clinton Can\'t Catch a Break

Arkansas Online has a Story on the trouble brewing over the new Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock. A man there won\'t give up his land so they can build the library because his is mad at Little Rock officials for spending more than $12 million on the land for the library.

\"The city of Little Rock can ill afford this huge expenditure, which has never been approved by the voters,\" Pfeifer said. \"The past two years have proved the ruinous effects the financing scheme has had on our city finances and public confidence.\"

$12 Million does seem like alot of money for this thing.

librarians tackle challenges of high-tech

This mercurycenter.com Story has some nice things to say about the libraries in the Silicon Valley Area. The future maybe home delivery of library books!

\"There\'s truly a renaissance going on with libraries, particularly in California,\" said Linda Crowe, president of the California Library Association, one of the conference\'s sponsors. \"Just five years ago, we didn\'t know much about the World Wide Web.\"

France\'s library malaise returns

Charles Davis sent along This Story on The New Library in France. The computers and other sytems were so bad the staff went on Strike when it first opened in 1998. A fire ripped through one of its underground corridors a month ago, and now it has reopened, only to make the employees sick. The unidentified malaise causes violent headaches and a burning sensation in the throat and eyes.

\"As a precautionary measure, the library will not open again until we have the results of new chemical and bacteriological analysis.\"

Publishers Perish, Libraries Feel the Pain

Here\'s an interesting story from the
NY Times,
sent in by alert reader Irene Wood. The story is about
libraries cutting their serials and book buying just to
meet the sharply rising cost of scholarly journals. They
cover the big publisher Reed Elsevier, and the $3.5
billion buy out of Harcourt General. Librarians say
consolidation in the industry is causing prices to sky
rocket, while the publishers say it\'s due to big
increases in demand.

Now that strikes me as odd,
I have yet to read a single story about any increase in
journal holdings at any library anywhere. What about
your library? Are you increasing or decreasing
your
journal holdings?Why?

Bibliotheca Alexandrina Almost Complete

I remember when the Bibliotheca Alexandrina had
somewhere between 200,000 and 700,000 scrolls. It
was a sad, sad day when the library burned down way
back in
48BC. Well now things are all better. National
Geographic
has a Story (sent in by Bob
Cox) on the $200 million renovations. When it is
opened, early next year, there will be room for 8 million
books.

\"I think it\'s an inspiring building,\" the
library\'s director, Professor Mohsen Zahran, says. \"It
has a great deal of symbolism and meaning, and it
carries a message to future generations.\"

It was a dark and Dewey night

Heraldnet.com has this Spoooky Story on a library ghost in Snohomish\'s Carnegie Building library. Miss Catharine McMurchy, who was a librarian there in the 20\'s and 30\'s still makes her rounds to keep the books \" neatly arranged according to the Dewey Decimal System\".

\"At one point, her chair began to shake. A gust of wind rattled a windowpane; the chair shook harder, \"As if a heavy-footed person walked beside me,\" she said.\"

Any ghosts in your library you\'d like to share?

Liberal Conservatives

Pressgazettenews.com has an Op-Ed Piece on the political-library climate in Green Bay. The Brown County Board of Supervisors (A conservative bunch?) actually voted to keep a library branch open, even though the money doesn\'t seem to be there.

\"People here may be conservative in many respects, but when it comes to public-policy issues that involve making hard choices, the people they elect to serve on the County Board might just be a bunch of bleeding-heart liberals.

ISC issue on racism in library services

Information for Social Change is a biannual journal from England that examines \"issues of freedom, censorship, and ethics amongst library and information workers\" and challenges \"dominant paradigms.\"


Issue number 11, on the web in its entirety, focuses on the issue of racism in library services. The Table of Contents is as follows:


  • Editorial: Combating racism in library and information services. Shiraz Durrani
  • Using CRE standard to combat racism in library services. Susan White
  • Response to Diversity. Glennor L. Shirley
  • On Combating Racism In Academic Librarianship. Sterling Coleman
  • Views from Britain: Case Studies And Comments.
  • The Quality Leaders Project: Conference Report. John Vincent
  • Knowing my Place. Beckford, H
  • Bring on the thought police: freedom of expression and the press in South Africa. Christopher Merrett
  • Meeting information needs for 1992 and beyond. John Vincent
  • Book Review: Stop Talking Start Doing! Attracting People of Color to the Library Profession. Reviewed by Ayub Khan
  • Minority Ethnic issues in social exclusion - Merton responds.

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