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Archiving a Website for Ten Thousand Years

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 05/18/2016 - 07:59
Topic
Hi.co, a website that allows its users to post “moments” with a photo and annotation, plans a similar trip to the distant future. The operators, Craig Mod (who has also previously written for The Atlantic) and Chris Palmieri, announced today that the site will freeze service in September 2016. However, all posts present in the site’s database at that time will be microprinted onto a two-by-two-inch nickel plate. The entire site—2,000,000 words and 14,000 photos—should fit on a single disk. Several copies will be made and distributed across the globe; the Library of Congress has already been secured as a repository. The plates have a lifespan as long as 10,000 years, and they may be viewed with a 1,000-power optical microscope.
From Archiving a Website for Ten Thousand Years - The Atlantic

High Treason (1929), movie preservation success story

Submitted by stevejzoo on Fri, 12/04/2015 - 15:47

In 2005, Kevin Tripp, executive director and archivist for the Alaska Moving Image Preservation Association, responded to a caller in Washington State who had inherited a box of old motion picture films. The films included the sound version of the 1929 sf thriller High Treason, long thought lost. Tripp arranged for the nitrate film to be transferred to the Library of Congress for restoration. The British Film Institute premiered the restored version in 2014.

Digital Archive To Preserve History In Atlanta's Manuel's Tavern

Submitted by Mock Turtle on Mon, 11/02/2015 - 17:46

In a few months' time, Atlanta's iconic watering hole and beloved neighborhood living room will close for renovation. A collaboration among three local academic institutions is underway to ensure that nearly 60 years of history hanging on the walls will be documented, annotated, and preserved for restoration after reopening.