Public Libraries

Public library Internet study Results

The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) announces the completion of the sixth public library Internet study. Public Libraries and the Internet 2000: Summary Findings and Data Tables was prepared by Dr. John Carlo Bertot and Dr. Charles R. McClure for NCLIS. The summary findings of the 2000 study are available Here (It\'s a PDF)

A few results:

Internet connectivity in public libraries is 95.7%, up from 83.6% reported in the 1998 study. Ninety-four point five (94.5) percent of public libraries provide public access to the Internet. Suburban libraries saw the largest increase in connectivity, reporting a 20% increase in public Internet connectivity since 1998. Public library outlets have nearly doubled the number of public access workstations since 1998. Seventy-five (75) percent of public library outlets have eight or fewer workstations as compared to four or fewer in 1998.

Outgrowing old buildings thanks to the Internet

The St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times reports that its local libraries are doing unexpectedly well -- so well, in fact, that several libraries will have to build new facilities soon. The article credits the Internet explosion and also touts libraries as a meeting place.

When the library opened in 1992, some residents questioned the need for such a facility. It would go unused, some said.

Eight years later, city officials said they have been \"astounded\" by the thousands of people who have passed through the library\'s glass doors. The library, which officials once thought would last decades, is running out of space to accommodate its many users.

\"It\'s been a surprise for the city,\" said library director Michael Bryan.

(Full disclosure: yes, the libraries mentioned are members of my employer, and boy are we proud.)

17-year-old banned for using library computers for porn

The Venice Public Library, in FL, has barred a 17-year-old boy for repeatedly using library computers to access pornographic Internet sites and sexually oriented chat. They gave him a few warnings, but the punk wouldn\'t listen. Police issued him a trespassing warning and the library barred him for a year.

\"\"This is a good library and a good part of the community, Fortunately, he (the teen barred from the library) is the exception, not the rule.\"
-said Mary Waddell, the head of Venice Public Library

Pennsylvania Libraries Improving

A Heart Warming
Story
from PA on how well the libaries are doing.
It\'s nice to see good news for a change.

\"Since 1999, the Ridge administration has more
than doubled state aid for libraries, to $62 million a
year. It has earmarked another $12 million for
computers, software and online resources for libraries.
State officials are rewriting Pennsylvania\'s 39-year-old
library code - the legal document governing public
libraries - to improve operations and reward local
governments that increase funding for their
libraries.\"

70s prom latest fund-raiser

Here\'s a nifty idea from Wisconsin for fundraising. The event is called Back to the 70s Prom, a fund-raiser on behalf of the Weyers-Hilliard Branch of the Brown County Library. Money raised Friday will buy books and other materials for the children\'s area. Nifty!


The Back to the \'70s Prom to benefit the Weyers-Hilliard Branch of the Brown County Library will take place Friday at the Comfort Suites of Green Bay, 1951 Bond St. Tickets are $12.50 each at the door, or $10 in advance. Hors d\'oeurves will be served. There will be a cash bar.


Full Story from PressGaztteNews.com

GASB 34

I am seeking information on how libaries and their parent municipalities are, or will be, dealing with the new audit requirements that will soon be required as a part of GASB 34.


For more information see:
http://www.sco.state.id.us/web/dsaweb.nsf/pages/gasb34.htm

GASB 34 will be implemented for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2001 (for large entities), with a three-year phase-in of the standard for all government jurisidictions. Most observers are describing it as the most monumental change in government financial reporting in American history. The common wisdom is that failure to follow the guidelines set by the Government Accounting Standards Board will cost communities dearly when their bonds are rated.

Traditionally, state and local governmental agencies have used cash accounting methods to report infrastructure assets like roads, bridges, water and sewer facilities and, of course libraries. With cash accounting,the capital cost of an infrastructure investment appears in an agency’s annual financial report during the year in which the cost of construction is incurred. The value of existing physical assets do not appear on financial reports. -- Read More

Best Reading Rooms

Timmy writes \"I saw this one over on librarian.net. The USAToday Travel Guide has an intersting story on some of the best library reading rooms from around the country, written by Ginnie Cooper, a librarian.\"
Full StoryThey include Louisville Free Public Library, Denver Public Library, The Library of Congress, and others.

British Royal Mint issues 50p \"Public Libraries\" coin

The British Royal Mint has issued a commemorative 50-pence coin celebrating public libraries. It\'s available in silver and gold, and of course you can order online from RoyalMint.com. At around $40 in the US, the silver commemorative could be a great thank-you gift to a dedicated volunteer or outgoing board member, or perhaps to your favorite LISNews.com correspondent. Read on for a brief history of public libraries in the UK... -- Read More

Seattle\'s online services well received

Ben Ostrowsky Writes:

The
King County
Library System
in
Seattle has gotten some
great publicity in the
Seattle Times recently.

I can go to my local library and take out a wide range of
fiction and
nonfiction materials. But, when looking for information
on a specific
topic, the most useful books often reside at other
libraries, are checked
out or can\'t leave the building. Yet, if I search the
Internet at home, I
can usually find the information I need, instantly.

Well, maybe not all the information I need, or at least as
many
authoritative sources as I should have to be
well-informed. It turns out
the library has precious online resources that are
available only through
a library\'s Web site.

Literature and a Latte

Ever Helpful R. Hadden Writes:\"

A new public library in Howard County is borrowing a page
from the corporate booksellers\' manual: Give the customers
convenience, comfy furniture and cappuccino.

Read The Story in the Washington Post.

\"Even those who hate mega-bookstores can see their formula is working. People flock to the stores, where they can linger for hours, catch a poetry reading, browse racks of magazines and newspapers and fill up on latte and scones.\"

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