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Deer checks in, checks out of school library

Deer checks in, checks out of school library
Whether it was to do research or check out the latest Dr. Seuss book, a deer broke through a back-door window and into the library at Graham A. Barden Elementary School Tuesday morning.
“He said he didn’t see the deer’s head,” Covert said of Becton. “He saw the back of it, and he was a small.”

President’s FY2011 budget proposals calls for cuts to school library funding

From the AASL Blog:

"WASHINGTON, D.C. – President Obama’s FY2011 Budget Proposal to Congress released today included a $400 billion investment into education but did not include specific funds for school libraries. Additionally, the budget called for a consolidation of the funds for the Improving Literacy Through School Libraries Program, which takes the funds out of reach for most school libraries."

Full entry

Stricken Dictionary Now Back at California School

MENIFEE, Calif. - A California school district that pulled a 10th edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary from classrooms because it defined oral sex will now allow it back on the shelves (here's our previous story on the incident).

However, parents can opt to have their kids use an alternative dictionary (a creationism dictionary?). Story from MSNBC.

AASL Adopts ‘School Librarian’ As Official Term for the Profession

Forget media specialist or teacher-librarian. As far as the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) is concerned, the official title for the profession is now school librarian.

Full story at School Library Journal

Libraries hold key to Detroit progress

Libraries hold key to Detroit progress
Detroit is looking in all the wrong places to explain its low reading scores and is ignoring the most obvious ("Detroit parents want DPS teachers, officials jailed over low test scores," Dec. 13). Jailing teachers, new reading initiatives and volunteer tutors are not the answer. The answer is improved school libraries staffed by certified librarians.

Comeback Planned for Girls’ Book Series

Scholastic Inc. will reissue the first two volumes of Ann M. Martin’s “The Baby-Sitters Club,” in the hopes of igniting enthusiasm in a new generation of readers.

Full story

Language in First Amendment Lesson Irks Middle School Parents

The parents told the school board that they were never asked or even told that their children’s librarian was going to write and use profanity as part of a lesson on controversial books.

However, when they heard what happened afterwards, from their 8th grade children In West Linn, OR, the upset parents said they were furious and in disbelief. They said the teacher exposed their kids to more than a dozen curse words (ed: I bet the kids could have taught her a few more).

“There was the “F-word” written on the board. The teacher yelled them at the kids and then asked the kids to yell them back at him," said parent Elizabeth Thiede. She also explained that her child was upset by the display that was apparently carried out as part of a language arts unit at Athey Creek Middle School.

For nearly 10 years, the school has discussed banned and controversial books as part of a successful First Ammendment curriculum. But never before has profanity been used in such a way, school district officials admitted.

NWCN.com has report and video.

Away From the Canon, Teen Books Hit Home

“Bitch.” “Pimp.” “Candy Licker.” “Snitch.” A few of the more lurid titles offered up by Mission High School students when asked what they were reading outside of class. The librarian explained that such books gain popularity through word-of-mouth. While some pegged as street lit or ghetto fiction are read mostly by African-American females, darker subject matters resonate across ethnic and gender lines.

On the Internet at Work? Stay 'Appropriate'

A librarian from Mount Anthony Middle School in Vermont was recently banned from working in all Vermont schools for inappropriately using the Internet.

David Wohlsen, a prekindergarten through Grade 12 library media specialist, surrendered his teaching license to the state Department of Education earlier this month on the grounds that he "violated school policy on appropriate Internet use," according to an Education Department Web site posting.

According to the school district's policy, unacceptable use of the Internet is "threatening or obscene materials, antisocial behaviors like hate mail, harassment or discriminatory remarks, for profit or illegal activities, product advertisement, political lobbying, other non-academic uses and non-educational mailing lists."

According to a previous article in the Bennington Banner, Wohlsen had retired at the beginning of this school year.

The Rutland Herald reports.

Supreme Court: Miami school can ban book on Cuba

School board members in Miami have won their battle to remove a children's book from the shelves of Miami-Dade school libraries because they said the book presented an inaccurate picture of life in Cuba.

On Monday, the US Supreme Court declined to take up the case of "Vamos a Cuba" – the little book that sparked a big controversy over alleged censorship in Miami.

The action lets stand a 2-1 ruling by the 11th US Circuit Court of Appeals that the school board's decision to remove the book was not censorship in violation of the First Amendment. Instead, the Atlanta-based appeals court said the school board was seeking to remove the book because it contained substantial factual inaccuracies.

Full story

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