Technology

The End User XP Gets Explained

For The International Herald Tribune, Lee Dembart takes \"end users\" on a tour of Windows XP. \"Once upon a time - 10 years ago, say - everyone in the know believed that computers would replace paper altogether. Not for the first time, everyone in the know turned out to be wrong. We have more paper now than ever. For example, if you go into a well-stocked bookstore, you will find an enormous section of computer books, row after row of them, many of which offer to explain how to use the computers that were supposed to make things simpler. Windows XP, the latest operating system from Microsoft Corp., has been out for just over a month, and, true to form, the shelves are groaning with volumes, thick and thin (mostly thick), that guide us through the ins and outs of it. Herewith, a guide to the guides. More

Systems Librarians Needed

Rachel writes \"For a forthcoming book on \"accidental systems librarians,\" I am seeking a number of people willing to take some time to answer a short survey on their experiences with systems librarianship. Thanks in advance for your time!


The survey can be found online at:


lisjobs.com/syslibsurvey.htm


It is available both as an online form and as plain-text for those who would prefer to respond via e-mail. Thanks!
\"

Ebrary Confident that It Can Survive

As the article\'s headline states, Ebrary is \"bulking up\" for the big one. Having secured some backing, the company intends to forge ahead in its offerings of academic e-publications. They feel confident that they\'ll survive the problems that have befallen Questia and NetLibrary.
More from CNETNews.

World\'s Largest Intranet Belongs to the U.S. Army

It has a whopping 70 Terabytes of storage and it\'s called the ArmyKnowledge Online Portal. (You can\'t log-in unless you qualify for an account). According to the article, at Wired News, \"it\'s a total aggregation of all the information the Army has. Whether it\'s a general at his desk in Washington or an infantryman in the deserts of Tajikistan, every one of the Army\'s active or retired personnel will have access to all of the army\'s online resources through the site. All soldiers on active duty have already been ordered to sign up and they are subscribing to the AKO at a rate of between 10,000 and 30,000 a day. More

Computers Have Had Little Impact in College Classrooms

The Chronicle of Higher Ed. has A Story on the large investment that American education has made in computers and technology -- and the reasons that those innovations have been underutilized in the classroom.

Oversold and Underused is the book by Larry Cuban they discuss.

See Also: small story on Clifford Stoll and a speech he gave up in Buffalo.

Cyber-sleuths demand new powers

James Nimmo passed along This Story from over at Findlaw on the seizure of a suspect\'s personal computer for the purpose of dissecting the hard drive for possible clues or motives.

FBI agents did just that in the days after the September 11 plane hijack attacks on America, when they confiscated two computers from a Delray Beach, Florida public library that were allegedly used by suspects.

Technology : advancement in libraries

linda writes \"Today technology is moving very fast in trying to make it easier for library users to aquire information.This therefore means librarians in libraries should make sure that they catch up with it as it runs.I\'ve attended a conference where a presentation was conducted about WIRELESS INNOPAC this is a device which looks like a cell phone and one can access a library anywhere in the world by operating the device eg. If one likes to check a book,using title ,author etc

This is possible with this device, this means you communiucate with the library even when in bed. Iam having a fear that at the end of the day as the time goes few librarians will be needed to run the library because most of the task will be done by such devices.\"

Very interesting stuff, though I can\'t find anything on \"Wireless Innopac\" on Google or innopacusers.org, wireless in libraries turned up some good results, including LibWireless:Wireless and Libraries group.

So what do you think, is wireless more of a threat to librarians than the Web?

Project Aims to Make Cuneiform Collections Available

jen writes \"Assyriology going hi-tech -
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative, a joint venture of
the University of California at Los Angeles and the Max Planck
Institute for the History of Science, in Berlin, will provide scholars
with access to an enormous database of cuneiform inscriptions.
With more than 200,000 tablets scattered throughout museums in
several countries (not counting the steady flow of black-market
items trickling out of Iraq and onto eBay), the world\'s 400
professional Assyriologists have been struggling to keep from being
buried alive by primary documents. The online library promises to
be the single-largest, most organized, and best cataloged repository
of cuneiform inscriptions in the world, according to its director,
Robert K. Englund, a professor of Near Eastern languages and
culture at UCLA.
Full Story from The Chronicle of Higher Ed\"

SSSCA Down for the Count?

The Electronic Frontier Foundation reports:

Senate Commerce Committee hearings relating to the Security Systems Standards and Certification Act (SSSCA), originally set for October 25, have been postponed in the face of mounting opposition from the technology community.

The SSSCA would require that all future digital technologies include federally-mandated \"digital rights management\" (DRM) technologies that will enable Hollywood to restrict how consumers can use digital content. Response to the draft bill, which was authored by Senator Fritz Hollings (D-SC), has been largely negative. EFF announced its opposition to the bill several weeks ago and encouraged its members to express their concerns to Senator Hollings. IBM, Intel, Microsoft, and others have since announced their opposition, as well.

Senator Hollings has not re-scheduled the hearings, and has indicated that he would consider modifying the bill.

Music Labels Target CD Ripping

jen writes \"N\'Sync\'s new CD can\'t be played or copied onto PCs.
While I\'m not necessarily crying about not being able to listen to N\'Sync at work [I am! says Blake], if I can make mix tapes, why not mix CDs?
\"Labels are reluctant to talk about their copy protection plans for fear consumers will be annoyed with any new restrictions. However, they\'re
already experimenting with copy-protection technology. \"

Full PCworld.com Story \"

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