Books

3 Million Judgements of Books by their Covers

One last preface: This isn’t a scientific study. The results do not account for how well known a book is (which would influence the rating despite the cover), nor do they account for the fact that Goodreads does not allow ratings under 1 star. Each book’s results certainly had a pattern however, some we found very interesting.

From 3 Million Judgements of Books by their Covers — Medium

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On the Pleasures of Not Reading

And the bigger problem is we’re sometimes wrong. Our distaste for the trappings of publication puts us off from something great. We can tut-tut the marketing departments for this, but we have to shoulder some of the blame ourselves, especially when we allow our attitudes to harden into beliefs. After years of suspecting that I hated Michel Houellebecq, I began to assert as fact that I hated Michel Houellebecq; more recently, I discovered that I deeply enjoy Michel Houellebecq. It took impassioned pleas by not one but several friends to get me to read him—an almost literal conversion effort. People have become Catholic for less.

From On the Pleasures of Not Reading

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Rousting the Book Pirates From Google

Google Play has been criticized as a sort of vast and unruly garden compared with Apple’s impeccably mowed lawns. In Forbes recently, Erik Kain called Google Play “an ugly, poorly organized store filled with myriad knockoffs, dubious ‘games’ and other apps.” That sounds a bit harsh to the Haggler, a Google Play regular who has had mostly positive experiences.

From Rousting the Book Pirates From Google - The New York Times

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Even University Libraries Aren’t Keeping Hard Copy Books

In the face of these changes, academic librarians have no choice but to take action. Their challenge, though, is that there are simply too many print books and not enough on-campus space to store them.

The most obvious solution to too many books is “weeding,” the library profession’s term for removing books from a collection. While weeding creates space for new books, it has significant labor and disposal costs. Also, it can meet with stiff resistance from faculty and students.

So an increasingly popular strategy for managing overcrowded stacks is moving books to high-density, low-cost, off-campus storage.

From Even University Libraries Aren’t Keeping Hard Copy Books

Even University Libraries Aren’t Keeping Hard Copy Books

In the face of these changes, academic librarians have no choice but to take action. Their challenge, though, is that there are simply too many print books and not enough on-campus space to store them.

The most obvious solution to too many books is “weeding,” the library profession’s term for removing books from a collection. While weeding creates space for new books, it has significant labor and disposal costs. Also, it can meet with stiff resistance from faculty and students.

So an increasingly popular strategy for managing overcrowded stacks is moving books to high-density, low-cost, off-campus storage.

From Even University Libraries Aren’t Keeping Hard Copy Books

Final Terry Pratchett novel The Shepherd's Crown on sale

The final novel by author Sir Terry Pratchett has been released, almost six months after his death.
The Shepherd's Crown, the 41st novel in his Discworld series, went on sale in the UK and Commonwealth at midnight BST (23:00 GMT Wednesday).
In the UK, fans gathered for midnight openings at stores in London, Oxford and Newcastle. More shops will open earlier than usual on Thursday.

From Final Terry Pratchett novel The Shepherd's Crown on sale - BBC News

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The Books that Taught American Women to Camp in the Early 20th Century

As a follow-up to the early 20th-century American camping guides in the Rare Book Room of the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), here is a look at their printed materials from the early 1900s reflecting this new focus on women and the outdoors. For example, Woodcraft for Women (1916) begins with these words by author Kathrene Sutherland Gedney Pinkerton:

From The Books that Taught American Women to Camp in the Early 20th Century

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Did technology kill the book or give it new life?

The book is dead, long live the book.
Digital technology has certainly had a profound effect on the traditional book publishing and retailing industries, but has it also given the book a new lease of life?

From Did technology kill the book or give it new life? - BBC News

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Bug-killing book pages clean murky drinking water

The "drinkable book" combines treated paper with printed information on how and why water should be filtered.
Its pages contain nanoparticles of silver or copper, which kill bacteria in the water as it passes through.
In trials at 25 contaminated water sources in South Africa, Ghana and Bangladesh, the paper successfully removed more than 99% of bacteria.

From Bug-killing book pages clean murky drinking water - BBC News

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Colorado Man Throws Books Out Car Window, Is Nabbed For Littering

A Colorado man plead guilty on Thursday to littering. He wasn't dumping trash, or toxic waste from a mine, but books, writes the Times-Call newspaper.

The paper reports that Glenn Pladsen, 62, got a ticket this spring after he tossed books along U.S. 287. Pladsen lives in Arvada, a town just outside of Denver, and apparently threw thousands of books out on the highway over several months because "he couldn't figure out another way to get rid of them."

If only he had other options. I took the liberty of googling "Denver book donations" and "used bookstores in Arvada." If he had sought out the advice of the Denver Public Library, they probably would told him they accept donations. It appears that there are a few used bookstores in Arvada, too.

Full piece:
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/08/14/432315904/colorado-man-throws-books-out-ca...

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