Book Stores

San Jose Lesbians and feminists mourn loss of Sisterspirit

San Jose Lesbian and feminists mourn loss of Sisterspirit

Bookstore beloved of Lesbian and feminists to close. Online bookstores and the acceptance of Gay literature in chain bookstores are blamed.

(Sorry to censor, but this site's spam filter wouldn't accept this submission otherwise.)

Bookstore Arrives, and Sides Are Taken

New York Times: WESTHAMPTON BEACH, N.Y. — Ever since Books & Books opened its doors on Main Street here last month, it has missed out on some of the adulation usually reserved for new independent bookstores in the age of Amazon.

Several storeowners nearby have ordered their staffs not to shop there. Indignant older women have marched inside the bookstore to yell at employees. And someone, or perhaps several someones, may have sneakily placed used chewing gum between the pages of new books.

The animosity seems to have stemmed from the fact that Books & Books moved in when there was already an independent bookstore, the Open Book, around the corner. And as some people saw it, there was no room for another one.

Full article

Bookstores: Oblivion or Survival?

"Saying that bookstores won't be around in the future because Wal-Mart and Amazon sell books is like saying Italian restaurants will go out of business because we have canned spaghetti sauce."--Michael Norris, a senior analyst at Simba Information, in a Houston Chronicle piece headlined "Booksellers buck e-trend: Analysts say there's a place for stores that do their job well."

Quick Change in Strategy for a Bookseller

The strong growth of electronic books has altered the way consumers browse and buy books, forcing big bookstore chains to find new ways to attract shoppers.

Full article in the NYT

Where do we lose the shelf space and how much do we lose?

Blog entry by publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin

There are two questions about the impact of digital change on publishing that are just about impossible to answer.

One is: how much of the sale of ebooks is incremental business and how much of it is cannibalization of prior print sales?

The other is: what will be the fate of independent bookstores?

The two are connected.

Full blog post here.

A Look at Who May Bid for Barnes & Noble

Now that Barnes & Noble has officially put itself up for sale, it’s time to ask: who may place a bid for America’s biggest brick-and-mortar bookseller?

Story in the NYT

Barnes & Noble Planning Big Push to Increase Nook Sales


In-house boutiques are Barnes & Noble’s latest front in the battle with Amazon over their competing e-reader devices.

Full story: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/30/business/media/30nook.html?_r=1&ref=technology

Bookmobile Gets Second Life as a Bookstore

Lafayette Bookstore in CA has had to close its bricks-and-mortar store, but will keep on trucking as the Bay Area Bookmobile.

"Big Blue" is a bookmobile that was decommissioned from the Ypsilanti (MI) District Library and was acquired and driven to the Bay Area during the week of June 20. The store is having a Saying Goodbye to the Brick-and-Mortar Party Thursday evening that will include "a ritual marking our move from the old to the new--we're doing a bucket brigade to move all the books from the new section of the bookstore into the bookmobile."

The store will have Lafayette Book Store and Bay Area Bookmobile Facebook pages and continue sending out the newsletter. As owner Dave Simpson wrote: "We'll be active there with a schedule of appearances, announcements of author signings and events, and as always, our book recommendations (and you can offer your own!). Come join the conversation!"

NC Bookstores Helping Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

At a time when the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library is suffering from deep county-wide budget cuts, local booksellers are banding together to offer financial support this August.

Three libraries closed indefinitely June 19, and to keep the remaining libraries open, the book-buying budget was reduced by 58 percent since last fiscal year.

That means the average wait time for a new book is six months - sometimes longer.

"We were able to keep the libraries open with the deals made with the municipalities, city and county, but we still had to make cuts elsewhere," said Angela Haigler, communications and marketing director for Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

To help out, 18 bookstores in the greater Charlotte area have agreed to hold their own three-day book sales and give a portion of profits to the library's book-buying fund.

"Customers will be asked if they're interested in supporting local libraries, and if they're interested, 10 percent of their purchases for that day will go to the libraries," said Edward Lee, general manager of the Books-A-Million at Concord Mills Mall.

A listing of participating stores and additional information at the Charlotte Observer.

Online competition forces price cuts on used books

Online competition forces price cuts on used books
The rise of the digital book has prompted one of Detroit's last independent bookstore operators, John K. King, to promote cutthroat pricing in an attempt to keep alive his two satellite used bookstores.

"What I can't stand is the free pass the e-books are getting," King said. "Like they are the greatest things and they have no negative aspect. Besides the closing of bookstores like mine, what about the toxic nature of those devices? Books are biodegradable."

Syndicate content