Bishops on filtering

Someone sent in this interesting Story from Clarionherald.They wrote:

\"Guidelines for using Cyberspace wisely\" states, \"Remind your children that some library computers offer free access to dangerous Web sites (the American Civil Liberties contests some filtering systems and the American Library Association has been adamant in demanding that library computers do not restrict access to porn sites). \"
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The article goes over the statement, from the U.S. Bishops, intended to help parents guide their children in use of the Internet .

\"In the simplest terms, Ignatius teaches that we must be careful in discerning what is good, what is evil and what is neutral in our lives. It follows then that we should embrace what is good, reject what is evil and make use of what is neutral in a positive way in our spiritual life. \"More from Clarion.org-

Number one for parents is to take the time and effort to become educated about the Internet. Number two is to “Select an Internet Service Provider (ISP) that provides the option of ISP-filtered access.”


Other key points on the checklist include: putting the computer in a public area of the house, not in a bedroom; spend time on the Internet with your children; focus on the good sites available; caution your children never to give out personal information; caution them on e-mail use; encourage your children to think about what they find on the Internet and to talk with you about anything they find questionable or objectionable.


Above all, communicate. Remind your children that some library computers offer free access to dangerous Web sites (the American Civil Liberties contests some filtering systems and the American Library Association has been adamant in demanding that library computers do not restrict access to porn sites).


The pornographers are busy selling their wares on the Internet, and browsing can be a minefield of dangerous porn sites. Some e-mail titles have friendly, seemingly harmless titles, such as one recently received by editor Thomas J. Dermody of the Catholic Post (Peoria, Ill.). Its greeting: “I finally found you. Hi.” The e-mail message was “This is for you. You’re going to love it.” The “gift” was a pornographic site only a mouse click away. Dermody noted that similar invitations go out en masse every day from the more than 60,000 pornographic web sites in Cyberspace.

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