Tome Raider stole antique books worth £1.1m

Charles Davis passed along this one from
The Guardian on a Cambridge graduate who stole antique books and pamphlets worth an estimated £1.1m from libraries and then sold them at auctions and is now facing a lengthy jail term. The Police named him the \"Tome Raider\" after they busted him with books like Principia Mathematica by Sir Isaac Newton, works by Galileo,
and The Wealth of Nations by the Scots economist Adam
Smith.
In total he stole 412 extremely rare antiquarian books making
the haul one of the biggest of its kind in British legal history.
Some have been returned to the libraries but hundreds of the
books have never been traced.

\"We don\'t assert he actually got them out of the libraries in the
first place but what he did afterwards was to pretend to be the
owner to sell them or store them away for later, we say, to make
quite a pile of money. We are not dealing with last year\'s law
book. We are going back hundreds of years with some of them.
They are valuable and he knew that.\"

See also, BBC Story on stopping book thieves in stores.

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