Next fiscal year

Next fiscal year we're planning on the time access software. It's a little too pricey to give a go now, unfortunately. Or maybe that is fortunate. It'll give us some time to get patrons accustomed to the idea.

My next plan is to get one of the old computers working, and make two more filtered internet terminals. I might just have to format c: (boy have I been doing that a lot lately) on the existing one (it's so old it has a serial mouse) just to get all the porn and crap that might possibly be on it off. Honestly, I'm sure there are viruses on there that our no longer supported virus software can't possibly catch.

I won't make my OS X mistake again though... I'll make sure our version of Fortres is compatible with 98 before I touch it.

I will also turn the terminal around, so that the screen is visible from inside the library. And it will be monitored for dirty things, which do in fact slip through our filter.

Less work specific: Yesterday a lady came in and stated, "You guys get new technology all the time, do you have any older computers you're selling?" I didn't laugh too much. But I smiled and thought, "Yeah, that's why half our computers are running Windows 98." I told her money was tight.

Bill and Melinda Gates money, over here, over here!

We do need internet education. I mean, we have internet education classes @our library (sorry, couldn't resist). People love them, and there is a waiting list. People still come in every day and need help locating the address bar in a browser. The assistant director, I feel, is right... You can only help so much. I'm not there to teach basic computer skills, I'm there to teach information skills. That being, if someone needs help with Google, fine. Or better yet, InfoTrac. But if someone can't close a window, well...

The same lady that told me we get new technology all the time needed help typing quotation marks. I didn't go to library school to be a typing teacher. Is it unreasonable to require some sort of familiarity with the technology (granted, typing isn't really the technology here)? You're not going to break a book by not knowing how to read the words. You can however mess up a computer.

How do you police that though? And how do you say no? I think it's in the nature of the librarian to be helpful when it comes to someone trying to learn something.

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