Library Cancels Summer Program

The director of the Pickens County Library in South Carolina cancelled the youth summer reading program entitled "You Never Know at Your Library" after the minister of a local church complained and people threatened to picket the library. The Greenville News article cited parents' complaints about occult topics in one session of the mystery and suspense oriented program. The only event left on the calendar is the final one - pizza tasting.

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well...

If you accept that palmistry is a bunch of nonsense then yes this is over the top. However in the age of hyper-equality where all religions are supposed to be considered equal then the library is obligated to offer alternative programing... bible lessons perhaps.

Re:well...

Palmistry is not a religion.

Re:well...

Yes, palmistry is not a religion - it is a particular element of certain belief systems that christians find offensive, or in opposition to their own religion.Therefore, the only TRUE way to offer equal time for each belief system at the library would be to have a class dealing with something that many christians do... and that others find offensive.Say, for instance...Gaybashing @ the library!"Come join us for an hour of good old heterosexual fun! We'll talk about how to approach gays, what happens if you think you might be catching the gay, and what to do if your husband thinks he might be gay. Special guest speaker - Ted Haggard.This event is open for all ages. Seating is limited."

Re:well...

religion-bashing... yeah that's original

Re:well...

"Seating is limited."

I know there is a joke in there about guys sitting on other guys laps. Or maybe spitting instead of sitting.

Re:well...

There is absolutely nothing in that post that could be defined as "religion-bashing."

Re:well...

you mean like saying that many Christians are gay-bashers?

Re:well...

It's a fact.

Re:well...

riiiight.... so what's it like being a hater?

Re:well...

I'll go ask a christian - be right back.

Re:well...

there's about 2 billion of them out there, make sure you ask them all...

Re:well...

Okay, I asked one. He said that he doesn't "hate the sinner, just the sin."Those crazy loveable christians, with their hilarious double talk.

Re:well...

so you would prefer people hate the sinner? or love the sin?

one more reason to

to avoid SC.

Re:well...

I prefer Option 3: "Mind their own damn business."

Re:well...

then the library should mind its own business and not offer such programs to begin with...

worked for me

I know that I got rid of all of my "round-earth" globes and everyone is MUCH happier.There is some problem about whether or not the copier is stealing people's souls or if throwing away unusable copies constitutes abortion, but I feel they can be worked out.So: huge success. Keep at it, Greg. Lower that bar.

Re:worked for me

I'm not the one lowering the bar Chuck. Like I said, its the age of hyper-equality, where everyone and everything has to be treated the same.

Re:worked for me

Riiiiight. The whole world is JUST as the National Review editorial board envisions it. Spot on.

Re:worked for me

Chuck you don't have the IQ to read Harvey comics so I doubt you know what NR has or hasn't said.

Re:well...

Being a Roman Catholic I think palmistry is a bunch of nonsense. Tarot cards, fortune telling, horoscopes, and many other things I think are nonsense too.

However when done in good fun, as I assume the library program was, they are harmless nonsense.

Let kids have some fun, don't picket the libray - adults can resolve problem in adult ways (not that a picket is not adult but in this case it is not).

Heck I think lots of people have nonsense religions, and they may think I am nuts because I believe in transubstantiation. But I am not picketing the Baptist church because of what they believe, nor the library because they have books on palm reading. Geez, perspective people. P
N.B I don't bother with A.Ps anymore. Walt taught me a valuable lesson. It is not worth the time spent typing, much less formulating a cogent response.

cultural biases in Tarot presentations

I do not have religious objections to Tarot reading myself, but as a player of Tarot card games, I object to what appear to be one-sided presentations of Tarot cards only in terms of divination.

Tarot cards, according to playing card historians, were not originally designed for fortune telling. They were created for playing a type of card game similar to Whist. Tarot card games are still played today in France, Austria, Italy, and Switzerland. There also appears to be a small but growing number of players outside Europe.
http://www.pagat.com/tarot/
http://i-p-c-s.org/history.html

If public educational institutions foster the notion that Tarot is only about divination and the occult, then they are not doing the job for which we pay them.

I think that taxpayer funded institutions such as public libraries and public schools which are designed to educate the public should give equal time to the card playing aspects of Tarot. Tarot is often presented in this country only as something to accept or reject in terms of its alleged accuracy in predicting the future. When other options such as card playing are being supressed, one is not actually free in how one views or uses the cards.

I must ask why must all presentations of Tarot in this country have to be occult related? Why do we not expose the young people to actual card games played with Tarot decks? Teens should be aware that Tarot cards are not just used for the occult or for divination. We should teach teenagers the rules for Tarot card games too. It is highly possible that young people may come to prefer the card games over the divination practices. They should be given an informed choice. We should educate young people about all aspects of culture including Tarot and not present one sided depictions of these matters.

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