Wild Bunch letter underscores problem

The AP Takes A Look at historic documents that are turning up stolen. They say experts are calling this a widespread national problem.
"Documents used to be the least sexy thing among cultural objects for thieves to steal, but not anymore," Nevada State Archivist Guy Rocha said.

While the scope of the problem is difficult to assess due to a lack of government statistics, many historians, librarians and dealers think the thefts are on the rise because of the soaring value of such rare documents.

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Really want to be depressed? Read on...

Given the lack of funding and strict control that can be placed on public employees:1) this sort of thing is unlikely to change - less incentive and money to stop it,more incentive to participate - who knows the collection better?2) with 1) above - as the money to keep and maintain these documents dwindles an ethical dilemma for the (historically minded) librarian arises -argue for more money to do the job and quit if not forthcomingOR close your eyes and do the best you can even if it is hopelessOR help it be stolen and sold to someone who will maintain it for future generations3) given 1) & 2) - what does an honest librarian/archivist do if historic/important docs go missing. If you search you will find an article about the ANWR map fiasco - the official (and only copy of the) map delineating the boundaries disappeared shortly before the Senate committee asked to see it - new map generated, different boundaries. Though this map was not well protected and may have just been junked.Picked from http://www.google.com/search?q=anwr+map+missinghttp://semiquark.blogspot.com/2005/10/anwr-map-con veniently-lost.html4) does your library/archive hold documents that constrain government action? eg a treaty between indigenous locals and colonists? Instructions from colonising power to colonisers (Colonists to Australia were directed by the Crown to get a formal treaty with the locals and did not do so - a fact which was relevant in the Mabo decision affirming indigenous land rights in Australia). Is it still there?Sorry the partially paranoid rant.

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