George Christian,Library Connections Peter Chase

kathleen writes ""Barton Gellman,Washington Post Staff Writer Sunday, November 6, 2005 reports: The FBI came calling in Windsor, Conn., this summer with a document marked for delivery by hand. On Matianuk Avenue, across from the tennis courts, two special agents found their man. They gave George Christian the letter, which warned him to tell no one, ever, what it said. Under the shield and stars of the FBI crest, the letter directed Christian to surrender "all subscriber information, billing information and access logs of any person" who used a specific computer at a library branch some distance away. Christian, who manages digital records for three dozen Connecticut libraries, said in an affidavit that he configures his system for privacy. But the vendors of the software he operates said their databases can reveal the Web sites that visitors browse, the e-mail accounts they open and the books they borrow.Christian refused to hand over those records, and his employer, Library Connection Inc., filed suit for the right to protest the FBI demand in public. The Washington Post established their identities -- still under seal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit -- by comparing unsealed portions of the file with public records and information gleaned from people who had no knowledge of the FBI demand....

New York Times first identified the recipient of the letter, based on court records, as the Library Connection, a consortium in Windsor, Conn.
Hartford Courant provides this: "Christian is identified in his affidavit as "John Doe 2." In that sworn statement, he said people often come to libraries for information that is 'highly sensitive, embarrassing or personal.' He wanted to fight the FBI, but feared calling a lawyer because the letter said he could not disclose its existence to "any person." He consulted Peter Chase, vice president of Library Connection and chairman of a state intellectual freedom committee."

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