But I Can Get Them From Blockbuster

While we fight, fight, and fight for Internet 1st Ammendment rights, another issue has popped up in public libraries all around the country...children checking out R-Rated movies. In this story from the Spokesman Review, a man brought the issue to the library board, and lossed. Whose responsibility is it? The parents or the library.\"Last week, the library\'s five-member board denied resident Pat Kilpatrick\'s request to ban kids\' access to R-rated movies.

Kilpatrick said the decision \"undermines the integrity\" of Post Falls.

\"My concern has been that the community is trying to maintain standards,\" Kilpatrick said, who\'s also asking local churches for help in changing the library policy.\"

\"In essence, the taxpayers are paying for these movies,\" Kilpatrick said. \"It\'s nuts.\"

\"The library board\'s attempts at a compromise last week didn\'t satisfy Kilpatrick. Tonight, he hopes to address City Council members at their meeting. Although he is not on the council agenda, Kilpatrick has rallied others to go to the meeting and speak when citizen\'s comments are allowed.\"

\"Though the City Council members can\'t override any of the library board\'s decisions, the city gives the library money and the council appoints library board members.\"

\"The library board isn\'t helping the community because it\'s forgoing standards that video stores and movie theaters adhere to, according to the Motion Picture Association\'s policies, Kilpatrick said. Restrictions for R-rated movies say that anyone under 17 must have an accompanying parent or guardian. Restricted movies at the library should be just that -- restricted to adults, Kilpatrick said.\"

\"Resident Dee Lawless said all R-rated movies should be banned from the library entirely. Lawless is a member of Immaculate Conception Church, which included in its Sunday bulletin a notice about tonight\'s meeting and asked for the congregation\'s help in voicing concerns at City Hall.\"

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