Bibliofuture's blog

SCSU Library Grad Program Loses ALA Accreditation

Odd graffiti

Graffiti on trains is common. Graffiti on trains commenting on the Internet? Not so common.

See: http://imgur.com/5UhogHi

River City Empire

River City Empire: Tom Dennison's Omaha
More than any other political boss of the early twentieth century, Thomas Dennison, “the Rogue who ruled Omaha,” was a master of the devious. Unlike his contemporaries outside the Midwest, he took no political office and was never convicted of a crime during his thirty-year reign. He was a man who managed saloons but never cared for alcohol; who may have incited the Omaha Race Riot of 1919 but claimed he never harmed a soul; who stood aside while powerful men did his bidding. His power came not from coercion or nobility but from delegation and subterfuge.

Orville D. Menard chronicles Dennison’s life in River City Empire, beginning with Dennison’s experiences in Colorado mining towns. In 1892 Dennison came to Omaha, Nebraska, where he married and started a family while solidifying his position as an influential political boss. Menard explores machine politics in Omaha as well as the man behind this machine, describing how Dennison steered elections, served the legitimate and illegitimate business communities, and administered justice boss-style to control crime and corruption. The microcosm of Omaha provides an opportunity for readers to explore bossism in a smaller environment and sheds light on the early twentieth-century American political climate as a whole.

Architecture at home in it's community

Buying into big-time college football: the 'System' behind the sport

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years

‘You’re no Banksy.’ Middle-class graffiti vandal gets 3½ years
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/crime/article3793618.ece

Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

Blog post from The Shatzkin Files: Losing bookstores is a much bigger problem for publishers than it is for readers

http://www.idealog.com/blog/losing-bookstores-is-a-much-bigger-problem-for-publishers-than-i...

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

On sale on Amazon for $1.99

The smile of a lonely realist

Sometimes a book is worthwhile for one good line in the book.
This line from the book "Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban" made the entire book worthwhile to me.

-----------------------

The man smiled with exaggerated patience. It was the smile of a lonely realist stranded in the society of cloud-cuckoos.

Old Glory : A Voyage Down the Mississippi by Jonathan Raban (page 19)

'Pernicious' Effects of Economic Inequality

It's been said that money is the root of all evil. Does money make people more likely to lie, cheat and steal? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on new research from the University of California, Berkeley about how wealth and inequality affects us psychologically.

Peter Singer: Authors at Google

Sidewalk poetry box

Sidewalk poetry box wins more fans for free verse
http://articles.latimes.com/2013/jan/01/news/la-lh-silver-lake-poetry-box-peleg-top-20121227

Poetry boxes at the library?

In 'Little Green,' an Old Character Makes an Easy Comeback

To Save Everything, Click Here

Book: To Save Everything, Click Here

In the very near future, “smart” technologies and “big data” will allow us to make large-scale and sophisticated interventions in politics, culture, and everyday life. Technology will allow us to solve problems in highly original ways and create new incentives to get more people to do the right thing. But how will such “solutionism” affect our society, once deeply political, moral, and irresolvable dilemmas are recast as uncontroversial and easily manageable matters of technological efficiency?

More details here

Every Book Its Reader: The Power of the Printed Word to Stir the World

Every Book Its Reader: The Power of the Printed Word to Stir the World
http://bookcalendar2013.blogspot.com/2013/04/every-book-its-reader.html

The Bradbury Chronicles

May 2nd posting at the 2013 Book Calendar

http://bookcalendar2013.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-bradbury-chronicles-life-of-ray.html

Brought to You by Mountain Dew

A PIONEER in what has become a hot trend on Madison Avenue — going beyond the realm of traditional advertising and into the world of editorial and entertainment known as content marketing or branded content — is hoping to ramp up its efforts by joining forces with a content specialist.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/26/business/media/mountain-dew-to-introduce-a-sponsored-web-s...

Book: Fear Less

The End of Power

Moises Naim's new book, "The End of Power," aims to track the history of political power and answer why being in charge isn't what it used to be. Ray Suarez talks with Naim, also a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about why power is both harder to use and to keep today.

Skygods

Skygods: The Fall of Pan Am
http://bookcalendar2013.blogspot.com/2013/03/skygods-fall-of-pan-am.html

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