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Search Patterns


Search Patterns: Design for Discovery

Search is among the most disruptive innovations of our time. It influences what we buy and where we go. It shapes how we learn and what we believe. In this provocative and inspiring book, you'll explore design patterns that apply across the categories of web, ecommerce, enterprise, desktop, mobile, social, and real-time search and discovery. Filled with colorful illustrations and examples, Search Patterns brings modern information retrieval to life, covering such diverse topics as relevance, faceted navigation, multi-touch, personalization, visualization, multi-sensory search, and augmented reality.
By drawing on their own experience-as well as best practices and evidence-based research-the authors not only offer a practical guide to help you build effective search applications, they also challenge you to imagine the future of discovery. You'll find Search Patterns intriguing and invaluable, whether you're a web practitioner, mobile designer, search entrepreneur, or just interested in the topic.

Amazon says it has sold millions of Kindles, beat out all of 2009 sales in just last 73 days

Amazon says it has sold millions of Kindles, beat out all of 2009 sales in just last 73 days

Story found at Teleread.com

Excerpt:

Message from Amazon Kindle Team:

Thanks to you, in just the first 73 days of this holiday quarter, we’ve already sold millions of our all-new Kindles with the latest E Ink Pearl display. In fact, in the last 73 days, readers have purchased more Kindles than we sold during all of 2009. We’re grateful for and energized by the overwhelming customer response.

Kindlerotica

The strange but inevitable rise of e-reader pornography.

As I write this, the most downloaded item for Amazon's Kindle is a novel by Jenna Bayley-Burke called Compromising Positions. Here is part of the plot description: "David Strong knows how to do a lot of things—run an international fitness company, finesse stock portfolios and stay out of emotional entanglements. That is, until he gets tangled up with Sophie Delfino and her Sensational Sex workout. He's supposed to help her demonstrate Kama Sutra positions for her couples-yoga class. … And his co-instructor unexpectedly tests his control to the limit." If that nudge and wink aren't clear enough, this is attached: "Warning: This is one exercise program you won't need to consult your doctor before beginning—unless he's hot and available for house calls. The Kama Sutra isn't for the prudish or faint of heart, and neither is this story."

Full article at Slate.com

In the stacks

A great photo of a Boston area book store that made it's rounds on Boing Boing yesterday!

Picture at Bookfinder

Indie Booksellers Pick 2010 Favorites

On NPR:

It's that time of year again! Susan Stamberg chats with three independent booksellers about their favorite reads of the year, from an atlas of remote islands to a children's book about feminist heroes.

Listen to story

Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter: A Novel

The Wilding: A Novel

The Cookbook Collector: A Novel -- Read More

My top five red herring ebook stories, 2010

The pundits have been out in full force this year, as ebooks finally hit the mainstream. But amidst all the hot air about pricing and contracts and DRM and i-Whatevers, a lot of ink was shed on some red herrings—issues which, on the surface, seem very important but in my opinion are mere diversions from the real story of the future of the ebook world. What are my top five red herrings, and why do I think they are not the stumbling points the pundits make them up to be? Keep reading to find out!

Full article at Teleread.org

The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time

The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time

Reading is a revolutionary act, an act of engagement in a culture that wants us to disengage. In The Lost Art of Reading, David L. Ulin asks a number of timely questions — why is literature important? What does it offer, especially now? Blending commentary with memoir, Ulin addresses the importance of the simple act of reading in an increasingly digital culture. Reading a book, flipping through hard pages, or shuffling them on screen — it doesn’t matter. The key is the act of reading, the seriousness and depth. Ulin emphasizes the importance of reflection and pause allowed by stopping to read a book, and the focus required to let the mind run free in a world that is not one's own. Far from preaching to the choir, The Lost Art of Reading is a call to arms, or rather, pages.

The Book in the Renaissance

The Book in the Renaissance

The dawn of print was a major turning point in the early modern world. It rescued ancient learning from obscurity, transformed knowledge of the natural and physical world, and brought the thrill of book ownership to the masses. But, as Andrew Pettegree reveals in this work of great historical merit, the story of the post-Gutenberg world was rather more complicated than we have often come to believe.

The Book in the Renaissance reconstructs the first 150 years of the world of print, exploring the complex web of religious, economic, and cultural concerns surrounding the printed word. From its very beginnings, the printed book had to straddle financial and religious imperatives, as well as the very different requirements and constraints of the many countries who embraced it, and, as Pettegree argues, the process was far from a runaway success. More than ideas, the success or failure of books depended upon patrons and markets, precarious strategies and the thwarting of piracy, and the ebb and flow of popular demand. Owing to his state-of-the-art and highly detailed research, Pettegree crafts an authoritative, lucid, and truly pioneering work of cultural history about a major development in the evolution of European society. -- Read More

Analyzing Literature by Words and Numbers

A new computer-generated process is giving scholars a prism into Victorian thought.

Victorians were enamored of the new science of statistics, so it seems fitting that these pioneering data hounds are now the subject of an unusual experiment in statistical analysis. The titles of every British book published in English in and around the 19th century — 1,681,161, to be exact — are being electronically scoured for key words and phrases that might offer fresh insight into the minds of the Victorians.

Full article

A Book Lover’s San Francisco

Article in the Travel section of the NYT

ON a balmy fall evening in the Mission District of San Francisco, hundreds of people spilled onto Valencia Street, where they chatted happily for a few minutes before pouring back into bookstores, cafes and theaters. It was a giddy, animated crowd, but most of all bookish — a collection of fans and believers, here to listen to the written word.

Full article

How Bad Are Bananas?

How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything

Is it more environmentally friendly to ride the bus or drive a hybrid car? In a public washroom, should you dry your hands with paper towel or use the air dryer? And how bad is it really to eat bananas shipped from South America?

Climate change is upon us whether we like it or not. Managing our carbon usage has become a part of everyday life and we have no choice but to live in a carbon-careful world. The seriousness of the challenge is getting stronger, demanding that we have a proper understanding of the carbon implications of our everyday lifestyle decisions. However most of us don't have sufficient understanding of carbon emissions to be able to engage in this intelligently. -- Read More

Zero Views

35 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every single minute. That means that for every hilarious video of a piano-playing cat enjoyed by millions, there are many, many more clips that suffer in anonymity. Colin Fitzpatrick's website Zero Views is a home for those clips. He collects videos that, at the time that he finds them, have never been viewed by anyone.

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of us

“Libraries are screwed, because we are invested in the codex, and the codex has become outmoded. It’s not just a change of text delivery format, it’s a move away from content that is ownable and shareable, and that’s a problem when your organization is in the business of owning and sharing content.

Read more at DigitalBookWorld.com: If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World
http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2010/if-libraries-are-screwed/#ixzz16y8AZ2WT

Taxes on ebooks

Looks like because of the agency pricing model that some publishers are using there is sales tax on certain ebooks depending what state you are in. I first saw a mention of this in a blog post by Mike Shatzkin called Most dramatic publishing event of 2010? Introducing agency pricing!

Running some searches I found some additional blog posts that discussed the issue.

Sales tax on ebooks and rising prices

Amazon Says Agency Model eBooks Are Subject to State Sales Tax

This article is particularly interesting because they tell what publishers are using the agency model and it what states they charge sales tax.

How does Diesel eBooks handle Sales tax?

Starbucks offers free Greg Bear e-book until December 7th

Story at Teleread.org

Line in article that I find most interesting:

As book-related marketing goes, this is quite an interesting idea. It could both draw interested readers to Starbucks, and interest Starbucks patrons in a new book. It does seem to run counter to the idea of e-books being location-independent—but on the other hand, location-based Internet services such as FourSquare are pretty hot right now.

Mad Men

Amazon is offering seasons 1,2,3 of Mad Men for $9.99 a season from Nov 25-27.

Mad Men: Season One

Mad Men: Season Two

Mad Men: Season Three

Oh, To Be Young: The Year's Best Teen Reads

Young adult author Gayle Forman picks her favorite teen novels of the year, from a Parisian adventure to a high school student affected by life during wartime.

http://www.npr.org/2010/11/19/131442476/oh-to-be-young-the-year-s-best-teen-reads

With Facebook Claiming the Word ‘Face,’ Some Alternatives

Facebook is a few steps away from trademarking the word “face,” according to a filing with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Full article here

Philip K. Dick’s Masterpiece Years

Article in the NYT about the book The Search for Philip K. Dick

Kindle next to Softbook

Picture on Flickr of a Kindle next to a Softbook. The Softbook is an ebook ereader than came out in 1998. In addition to the picture is some commentary about e-ink.

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