Why are middle-aged women invisible on book covers?

It seems the book world doesn’t think readers want to see women of a certain age on their novels – even if that is precisely what the books are about. Take a look at some literary novels about older women – Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge, Elena Ferrante’s The Story of the Lost Child, Anne Tyler’s A Spool of Blue Thread, Carol Shields’ Unless – and you’ll see a lighthouse, two children wearing fairy wings, a young couple in a car and a child standing on her head.
From Why are middle-aged women invisible on book covers? | Alison Flood | Books | The Guardian
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The Art Of Sci-Fi Book Covers

The Art Of Sci-Fi Book Covers

Video from Nerdwriter showing and discussing the art of sci-fi book covers.
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Can You Name a Book? ANY Book??? - YouTube

According to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, almost one in four Americans has not read a book in the past year. So to find out if that is true, we sent a team to the street to ask pedestrians to name a book, and here are the very sad results.
From Can You Name a Book? ANY Book??? - YouTube
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Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread

Bold efforts to push academic publishing towards an open-access model are gaining steam. Negotiators from libraries and university consortia across Europe are sharing tactics on how to broker new kinds of contracts that could see more articles appear outside paywalls. And inspired by the results of a stand-off in Germany, they increasingly declare that if they don’t like what publishers offer, they will refuse to pay for journal access at all. On 16 May, a Swedish consortium became the latest to say that it wouldn’t renew its contract, with publishing giant Elsevier.
From Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread
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Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads

Swedish universities have moved to cancel their contract with journal publisher Elsevier as concern over slow progress towards open access spreads. The Bibsam Consortium, which represents 85 higher education and research institutions in the country, said that its current agreement with Elsevier would not be renewed after 30 June.
From Sweden cancels Elsevier contract as open-access dispute spreads | Times Higher Education (THE)
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The Natural Enemy of the Librarian

Uplifting monument or waste of space? Philip Johnson’s Bobst Library and a conflict between professions, a shift from book warehouses to social hubs. Photographs by Andrea Geyer.
From The Natural Enemy of the Librarian - Triple Canopy
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The mysterious Cambridge library tower, supposedly full of banned books, is opening to the public

At 157ft tall and 17 floors, Cambridge University Library’s tower can be seen for miles around but has largely kept its secrets to itself and its contents (approaching one million books) have given rise to much speculation. But now in a new free exhibition, Tall Tales: Secrets of the tower, we reveal some of the truth about what the great skyscraper really holds.  
From The mysterious Cambridge library tower, supposedly full of banned books, is opening to the public | The Independent
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Competitive advantage of the library

Malcolm Gladwell asked about not liking Google and then discussing the competitive advantage of the library. The entire interview is 50 minutes but the link drops directly to the comments on Google and libraries and that discussion is around 1-2 minutes.
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Library built over river

See a picture of the Renton Library (Washington) that is built over a river.
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CBC is destroying its broadcast archives after they’re digitized

But internationally accepted standards and best practices of audiovisual preservation call for retention of originals, due to the unknown characteristics of digitization, such as long-term stability and vulnerability to electromagnetic interference, the foundation said. It also questioned why Radio-Canada was preserving its master recordings after making digital copies but CBC had opted to rely only on digital copies. “Such inequitable treatment of cultural treasures is not acceptable,” said Wilkinson.
From CBC is destroying its broadcast archives after they’re digitized | The Star
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Mary Regula, Founder of Library Saluting First Ladies, Dies at 91

Mary Regula, who led a successful campaign to establish a national library to research and commemorate the disparate and often unsung roles played by presidential spouses, died on April 5 at her family’s farm in Navarre, Ohio. She was 91.

The Bookmobile Interview From StoryCorps

Growing up in the 1960s, Storm Reyes lived and worked in migrant labor camps across Washington state. When she was 8 years old, she began working full-time picking fruit for under a dollar an hour. At StoryCorps, Storm shared stories of her difficult childhood with her son, Jeremy Hagquist, and remembers the day a bookmobile unexpectedly arrived, opening up new worlds and bringing hope.
From The Bookmobile – StoryCorps
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What Do You Think of Reading Books as a Punishment?

From an article in The New York Times, a judge imposes juveniles to read from a list of books and report on their reactions.

  • A Virginia judge handed down an unusual sentence last year after five teenagers defaced a historic black schoolhouse with swastikas and the words “white power” and “black power.”

    Instead of spending time in community service, Judge Avelina Jacob decided, the youths should read a book. But not just any book. They had to choose from a list of ones covering some of history’s most divisive and tragic periods. The horrors of the Holocaust awaited them in “Night,” by Elie Wiesel. The racism of the Jim Crow South was there in Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” The brutal hysteria of persecution could be explored in “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller.

  • End of the Annoyed Librarian

    AL is calling it quits. Full post here.
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    6 Books to Read in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Death

    Historians and biographers have spent much ink celebrating and interrogating the life and influence of Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 50 years since his assassination on April 4, 1968. Readers interested to know more about the iconic civil rights hero can choose from a wide range of literary options — from shorter books that give an easily digestible overview of his life, to multi-volume tomes exploring his every action in great detail. While some books take a holistic approach toward the life of the man, others focus in on sub-topics of his legacy.

    In honor of the 50th anniversary of his death, here are 6 books to read about Martin Luther King, Jr: Full article here
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    Code4Lib 2018 Keynote: Chris Bourg, Director of Libraries at MIT

    'Dancing Bears' Offers A Look Into How Countries Adapted To Life After Communism



    Polish journalist Witold Szablowski's nonfiction book, Dancing Bears, introduces readers to people in formerly communist countries who have a hard time adapting to life after the being freed from oppressive regimes.

    Story on NPR
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    For Bookmark Aficionados

    Like bookmarks? Check out the International Friends of Bookmarks site run by Laine Farley.

    Link should work now.
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    Jeremy Keith on forced SSL, AMP, and abuse of power

    I strongly disagree. If you also disagree, I encourage you to make your voice heard. Remember, this isn’t about whether you think that we should all switch to HTTPS—we’re all in agreement on that. This is about whether it’s okay to create collateral damage by deliberately denying people access to web features in order to further a completely separate agenda. This isn’t about you or me. This is about all those people who could potentially become makers of the web. We should be welcoming them, not creating barriers for them to overcome.
    From Adactio: Journal—Ends and means
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    From Overdue Books to Overdosed Patrons

    Story from the NYT .

    The opioid epidemic is reshaping life in America, including at the local public library, where librarians are considering whether to carry naloxone to battle overdoses. At a time when the public is debating arming teachers, it is another example of an unlikely group being enlisted to fight a national crisis.

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