Where Do Books from Closed Libraries Go?

Philly Voice answers the {infrequently asked} question:

Q) What happens to the books at closed libraries like the South Philadelphia one at Broad and Morris streets?

Question answered by Jennifer Maguire-Wright, chief manager of materials for the Free Library of Philadelphia:

A) The materials in the South Philadelphia collection were mostly sent to other neighborhood libraries in the library system. Items that were in poor condition or outdated were withdrawn from the collection -- we call it “weeding,” in library lingo. Those items are typically offered to other city agencies for a period of time and then sold in book sales.

How do you determine which ones get the boot?

We have a collection development policy that includes details on how we keep our collections fresh and current. Typically, items are removed from the collection due to condition. Our books can be well-loved to the point that they are falling apart. For non-fiction, we have guides based on the content. A good example is health-related materials. Anything older than five years is looked at critically to see if there are newer titles on the topic ...

Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late

IPFS is a new peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol that aims to supplement, or possibly even replace, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol that rules the web now. Here’s the problem with HTTP: When you go to a website today, your browser has to be directly connected to the computers that are serving that website, even if their servers are far away and the transfer process eats up a lot of bandwidth.

From Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late | TechCrunch

Second Palo Alto Library Closed For Bed Bugs

Another library is closed because of a bed bugs - this time it's the Rinconada Library in Palo Alto, the second library in this city affected in the last few weeks, and at least the third library in the Bay Area to host the tiny pests.

From Second Palo Alto Library Closed For Bed Bugs | NBC Bay Area


Seed libraries sow more than good will

They call it a seed library, but you won’t get any fines for overdue seeds. In fact, the library doesn’t want you to return the seeds you borrow. When you have grown them, and saved seeds from the plants you grew, seed librarians would like some of those, but even that is not a strict requirement to “check out” free seeds for your garden.

From Seed libraries sow more than good will - San Francisco Chronicle


Why Don't Libraries Have Dungeons & Dragons Gamebooks?

Dungeons & Dragons and libraries should be a natural fit. Both attract people who love books, storytelling, and lore. Early D&D gamebooks even point readers towards their local libraries for research, and many libraries host comic book-themed events or have D&D clubs.

This is why I was so surprised to learn how rare it is for libraries to collect D&D or any role playing game materials.

From Why Don't Libraries Have Dungeons & Dragons Gamebooks?


OCLC prints last library catalog cards

DUBLIN, Ohio, October 1, 2015—OCLC printed its last library catalog cards today, officially closing the book on what was once a familiar resource for generations of information seekers who now use computer catalogs and online search engines to access library collections around the world.

From OCLC prints last library catalog cards


Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

From Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA


The Future of the Internet Is Flow

The Future of the Internet Is Flow
Forget the clunky Web. The future of the online world will be a river of information flowing through time

From The Future of the Internet Is Flow - WSJ


Hemingway in Love

Hemingway in Love
In a new memoir, one of Hemingway's closest friends reveals how the great writer grappled with the love affair that changed his life and shaped his art

From Hemingway in Love | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian


The Incredible Expandable Book

Like most objects, books are confined to the space they occupy, obedient as they are to the laws of nature. That is to say, unlike the Incredible Hulk, they do not normally expand beyond the limits of their own physicality. This post will challenge your beliefs if you agree with this statement. It draws attention to types of medieval books that do expand beyond their physical limits: with a flick of the finger or a gesture of the hand the dimensions of these special objects increased dramatically, up to ten times their original size. As if defying the laws of nature, this miraculous expansion increased the available writing space in objects that were principally designed to be small and portable. The examples in this post suggest that this given of “doing more with less” was an important drive behind the clever design of expandable books.

From The Incredible Expandable Book | medievalbooks


I’m a Librarian Who Banned a Book. Here’s Why.

While we now have several trivial and frivolous national events such a as National Coffee Day or Talk Like a Pirate Day, events that bring attention to real issues – like Banned Book Week – are too often overlooked.

Ultimately, a banned book cuts at the heart of what makes a free democracy work. As Noam Chomsky said during a 1992 BBC interview, “If we don’t believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don’t believe in it at all.”

From I’m a Librarian Who Banned a Book. Here’s Why.


Remember Hydrox?

Is it or isn't it the Public Librarians favorite cookie? Rumor has it that they're coming back. But as you are library folk, rumor doesn't quite cut it.

Post inspired by recent conversation on Publib list Publib Archives.

Please comment yay or nay. Any votes for 'Nilla Wafers?

Oyster to Exit E-Book Subscription Business

It’s not so easy to offer a Netflix-like experience.

The Oyster e-book subscription service that launched with much fanfare in 2013 has posted a note on its blog stating it will be exiting that business over the next few months and offering refunds to subscribers who request them. The service provides access to more than 1 million e-books on an all-you-can read basis for $9.95 a month.



Margaret Atwood: ‘People bond to the books. Nobody wants my shoelaces’

People see my head on a book and attach a tall body to it. The image of somebody that you have accorded status to in your mind is a large one; the Greeks always made the gods quite tall. I’m short. Shorter than you think.

From Margaret Atwood: ‘People bond to the books. Nobody wants my shoelaces’ | Life and style | The Guardian


When It Comes To Book Sales, What Counts As Success Might Surprise You

When It Comes To Book Sales, What Counts As Success Might Surprise You

Whenever you read about book awards you hear they help boost sales. But what you might not know is just how much those sales need boosting. Two prestigious awards announced nominees this week; in the U.K. the Man Booker unveiled its short list and in the U.S. the National Book Awards announced its long lists.

The awards news came on the heels of a survey from the Authors Guild about the sorry state of author incomes. So what happens to writers who never get anywhere near an awards ceremony?

Washington Post critic Ron Charles reviews the kinds of books that get nominated for literary awards. These are not the blockbusters, the books written by the likes of Stephen King and Nora Roberts that make millions.

Full piece:


Big Tech Has Become Way Too Powerful

The underlying issue has little to do with whether one prefers the “free market” or government. The real question is how government organizes the market, and who has the most influence over its decisions. We are now in a new gilded age similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation’s antitrust laws were enacted. As then, those with great power and resources are making the “free market” function on their behalf. Big Tech — along with the drug, insurance, agriculture and financial giants — dominates both our economy and our politics.

From Big Tech Has Become Way Too Powerful - NYTimes.com


Talking books at 'Living Library'

"I had never thought about it as a child," Fox said. "For me as a storyteller it helped me to uncover the feelings I had about being in a religious minority. That was very illuminating as I heard myself verbalize it."

From Talking books at 'Living Library' - The Manchester Journal


Apple, Google, and Microsoft are all solving the same problems

Between them, Apple, Google, and Microsoft pretty much set the agenda for the entire consumer electronics industry. They employ a great number of the smartest and most creative technologists in the world and produce the most influential innovations. Whether it’s Windows, the iPhone, or Google’s titular search, these three American giants’ contributions have shaped our social and economic milieux as much as our technological one. Their futures promise to be as different as their pasts, however the present products and services on offer from each company show them to be closer than ever. They all seem to be solving the same problems.

From Apple, Google, and Microsoft are all solving the same problems | The Verge


E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep

Use of a light-emitting electronic book (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness and the circadian clock, which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, according to Harvard Medical School researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. These findings of the study that compared the biological effects of reading an LE-eBook to a printed book are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on December 22, 2014.

From E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep | HMS


History As Big Data: 500 Years Of Book Images And Mapping Millions Of Books

What would it look like to reimagine the book not as pages of text, but as a global distributed gallery of illustrations, drawings, charts, maps, and photographs that together comprise one of the world’s greatest art collections? In Fall 2013 I approached the Internet Archive with the idea of using computer algorithms to extract every image found on all 600 million pages of their digitized book collection, along with the text surrounding each image and the basic metadata about the book. In just over a month I did precisely that, creating a massive gallery that is slowly being uploaded to Flickr.

From History As Big Data: 500 Years Of Book Images And Mapping Millions Of Books - Forbes



Subscribe to LISNews: RSS