Social Networking

Banning Social Media in Libraries

Piece at EarlyWord about a social media discussion group they have created and how some librarians cannot participate because their employer does not allow social media.

Full piece

Engaged Readers

Engaged Readers, the first online reading program for public libraries with fully-integrated social networking features, is the latest offering from EngagedPatrons.org. Readers can create profiles, build and share booklists, write reviews, and get reading suggestions from library staff as well as fellow readers. EngagedPatrons.org has been providing web services to public libraries since 2006. Services are free for small- and medium-sized libraries (about 85% of U.S. public libraries). http://engagedpatrons.org/read

Social Media Lure Academics Frustrated by Journals

By Jennifer Howard in the Chronicle of Higher Education

Social media: A guide for researchers

Social media is an important technological trend that has big implications for how researchers (and people in general) communicate and collaborate. Researchers have a huge amount to gain from engaging with social media in various aspects of their work.

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A Stealth Librarian Manifesto (from Confessions of a Science Librarian)

<blockquote> "Stealth librarianship is a way of being...the principles of stealth librarianship apply to all branches of the profession, each in particular ways...the core is the same: to thrive and survive in a challenging environment, we must subtly and not-so-subtly insinuate ourselves into the lives of our patrons.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #140

This week's episode is a cross-cutting, interdisciplinary look at the violation of the knowledge ecology perpetrated in Egypt. Practical discussion is presented as to circumventing the disruption of Internet access as well as SMS/MMS messaging as seen there. Implications for information architecture are also discussed. Related links: Xubuntu Project Lead Approved Mashable: Egypt Protests Deutsche Welle: Egypt Protests Media Network: Egypt Protests Renesys: Egypt Leaves The Internet The Other McCain: Egypt Protests The Register: Egyptian Media Crackdown Al Jazeera English: Egypt Leaves The Internet Al Jazeera English: Online Activism Fueling Protests Caroline McCarthy: No such thing as a "social media revolution" Committee to Protect Journalists: Egypt Leaves The Internet The Register: Vodafone acknowledges shut down order Librarian Phoebe Ayers: Egypt Protests Infodisiac: Egypt access to Wikipedia disappears The Associated Press: Egypt Leaves The Internet...and fails to quell protests! Media Network: Radio Netherlands Worldwide to target increased broadcasting at Egypt The Associate Press: The Day Part of the Internet Died RFC 1930: "Guidelines for creation, selection, and registration of an Autonomous System (AS)" Ars Technica: How Egypt Fractured The Internet RIPE Network Coordinate Centre stats on Egypt traffic Project Gutenberg's CD & DVD Project for offline access LOCKSS MirrorBrain FLDIGI QSSTV TOR Project: Egyptians Switch En Mass To The Onion Router TOR Project: Downloading for Ubuntu

Creative Commons License
LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #140 / Burning Circle 17 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Desk Setup: A Look At Librarian Computers

The Desk Setup

Like many technologists, I may have had some vague notion that librarians had something to contribute to discussions about information and metadata and standards and access, but my concept of what librarians did and what they knew probably had more to do with stereotypes and anecdote than on an understanding of reality. Which is a shame. Although in the last few years I think we’ve done a really good job of making clearer connections between libraries and technology, I don’t think anyone is surprised when librarians are omitted from discussions about and between prominent technologists, such as the one facilitated by the Setup. (Note: by “librarians” I mean anyone who works in, with, or for libraries. Hat tip to Eli Neiburger for saying what I’d been thinking, only less clearly, for some time before he said those words out loud.)

If It's Shared Online, It's Shared With the Whole World

There is no privacy online. NOT FOR WORK OR THE SQUEAMISH/or OLD FUDDY-DUDDIES.

A vigilant LISNews reader told me about the Duke grad and her powerpoint sex project.

Karen Owen's PowerPoint list is more famous now than she ever could have imagined. Owen, a Duke graduate of 2010, has become an internet sensation after a mock-thesis titled, "An education beyond the classroom: excelling in the realm of horizontal academics," went viral around the internet and propelled her into the mainstream media spotlight.

Since creating the now widely-seen list -- a project rating her sexual conquests during her time at Duke -- Owen has been thrust to the forefront of discussions about sex on college campuses and amongst American youth, including stories on prominent outlets such as CBSNews.com and on NBC's The Today Show, as well as garnering huge attention in the blogosphere.

And from Jezebel, the 42-page presentation (slides 9, 10 about sex in the library). And now the publishers have come to call.

Social Media & Library Advocacy

In the most recent New Yorker, Malcolm Gladwell examines the social activism in the age of social media. If you have any interest in library advocacy, you need to go read it now. The gist of this article is that social media is excellent for reaching a multitude of people, but it lacks some of the strong bonds that turn interest into action.

The kind of activism associated with social media isn’t like this at all. The platforms of social media are built around weak ties. Twitter is a way of following (or being followed by) people you may never have met. Facebook is a tool for efficiently managing your acquaintances, for keeping up with the people you would not otherwise be able to stay in touch with. That’s why you can have a thousand “friends” on Facebook, as you never could in real life.

This is in many ways a wonderful thing. There is strength in weak ties, as the sociologist Mark Granovetter has observed. Our acquaintances—not our friends—are our greatest source of new ideas and information. The Internet lets us exploit the power of these kinds of distant connections with marvellous efficiency. It’s terrific at the diffusion of innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration, seamlessly matching up buyers and sellers, and the logistical functions of the dating world. But weak ties seldom lead to high-risk activism.

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Friday, October 1st - It's Follow A Library Day on Twitter

It's follow a library day on Twitter (#followalibrary)! Lots of cool Follow a Library videos on the above site, such as Daenel T/ and on twitter: www.twitter.com/DaenelT : ..and here's a message from the inimitable Jessamyn West / and on twitter: www.twitter.com/jessamyn Who are YOU following and WHO'S FOLLOWING YOU?

Want to Tweet To the Cream of the Crop?

Times are tough for the libraries and librarians in your life. No matter where you live, your library needs your support right now. To celebrate these passionate literary professionals, we have created another directory curated by GalleyCat Reviews readers.

At the end of this post, we are building a directory of the Best Library People on Twitter. Add your favorite library, librarian, or library journalist (or yourself) to the growing list. Our feeble list IS NOT COMPREHENSIVE–yet. Add your favorite library people in the comments, we’ll add them to the list.

Here's Galley Cat's List of "Best Library People on Twitter"...

Worldwide Follow a Library Day on Twitter Oct 1st 2010

What would happen if each person on twitter would mention his or her favorite library there? One definite outcome would be: the enormous amount of positive attention to this great industry. And for this reason October 1 2010 has been declared the follow a library on twitter day.

Facebook Answers

Is Facebook set to become the 'folk reference desk' of the future? Maybe so, if the rollout of Facebook Answers is a success. From Information Today's <a href="http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/Facebook-Questions--Askcom-Cashing-in-on-Mass-Ignorance-69187.asp">NEWSBREAKS</a>: "What the evangelists of the Semantic Web say is true: the bigger the web gets, the harder it is to find what we want to know.

The Dragonfly Effect and Social Enterprise

A Stanford discussion on the Social Innovation Conversations Network

The Dragonfly Effect and Social Enterprise

Named for the only insect that is able to move in any direction when its four wings are working in concert, the “dragonfly effect” has to do with how everyday people achieve unprecedented results in social enterprise through harnessing the incredible power of social media. In this university podcast, Stanford Graduate School of Business Professor Jennifer Aaker introduces the dragonfly effect model to business school students at Stanford who want to learn how to use technology to advance business and social missions. Her lecture was part of her new experiential class at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, “The Power of Social Technology” (PoST).

Listen or download the MP3 to the 17 minute piece here.

The speaker, Jennifer Aaker, also has a book coming out on this topic: The Dragonfly Effect: Quick, Effective, and Powerful Ways To Use Social Media to Drive Social Change

Oil spill emergency information reporting system: OilReporter.org

<a href="http://oilreporter.org/">OilReporter.org</a> is a system created to channel information from the general public on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. iPhone or Android mobile phone users can download a free app which permits them to report oiled beaches and animals directly from their phones or volunteer to help with the response.

One Book, One Twitter...It's Not Your Grandmother's Book Club

Don't believe what you read, says author and editor Jeff Howe in the Christian Science Monitor. "The Internet is not destroying literature." If anything, he argues, "the new medium could breathe new life into a few old ones."

To prove his point, earlier this month Howe kicked off "One Book, One Twitter," which Howe hopes will become "the largest collective reading exercise in history." As Howe explains in book industry trade magazine Publishers Weekly, "This summer, thousands of people from all over the world are reading Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods.' They will then discuss the book using Twitter, a new-fangled technology that's doing for the epigram what Anne Frank did for diaries."

Howe says he got his idea from Seattle's celebrity librarian Nancy Pearl who, in 1998, launched the "One City, One Book" group read concept, now adopted by many other municipalities as well.

Discussions in 140 characters or less...what are your thoughts?

Life Without Online Privacy

Despite the invitations and cajoling of many friends, I put off joining Facebook for quite a long while. And then I caved. I've enjoyed connecting with dozens of people I would not have located otherwise, but Facebook's inconstant privacy policies and questionable use of private information is getting under my skin. Here's why ... http://uflstaffpicks.blogspot.com/2010/05/life-without-online-privacy.html John Gehner, The Urbana Free Library

The Perils of Automatic Copyright Protection

A cautionary tale about copyright, and the <a href="http://blogs.sos.wa.gov/library/index.php/2010/04/the-perils-of-automatic-copyright-protection/">automated systems that enforce it</a>. If you post a video on YouTube, using one of their very own video creation tools, don't you expect it to go up and be viewable without any problems? Because of YouTube's Content ID system, it might not be so easy ... Read the full story <a href="http://blogs.sos.wa.gov/library/index.php/2010/04/the-perils-of-automatic-copyright-protection/">here</a>.

Every. Single. Tweet. Now on the LOC Blog

Ars Technica reports: The Library of Congress is archiving for posterity every public tweet made since the service went live back in 2006. Every. Single. Tweet.

The LOC announced the news, appropriately enough, on Twitter. Twitter isn't just about being pretentious and notifying the world about the contents of your lunch (though it's about those things too).

Matt Raymond, one the Library's official bloggers, notes that "important tweets in the past few years include the first-ever tweet from Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, President Obama’s tweet about winning the 2008 election, and a set of two tweets from a photojournalist who was arrested in Egypt and then freed because of a series of events set into motion by his use of Twitter."

But even those billions of other tweets and retweets, the ones about how you just got back from the worlds' most epic jog or how you're sick at home with the crocodile flu or how your crappy Internet connection just went down again and you can't take it any more—those matter too.

Try the blog (it was down when I tried); the LOC says on Twitter:
" Sorry, LOC blog having some disruptions. Twitter acquisition story also on Facebook" about 1 hour ago via web.

The New York Times weighs in on Twitter on LOC.

SaveLibraries.org, Two Weeks Old and Going Strong

Want to keep up on what's happening with efforts around the country to help save libraries? There's a great new site for that, appropriately named Save Libraries. Their motto is "When one library is in trouble, ALL libraries are in trouble." This project is being run by Lori Reed and Heather Braum. They can’t do this alone and are looking for additional help creating and maintaining the content on this site.

Save Libraries is a grassroots effort to compile information about libraries in need of our support. Save Libraries will aggregate information about current advocacy efforts, archive advocacy efforts, and provide links to resources for libraries facing cuts. The project began barely two weeks ago, and is already attracting attention.

Please email us at savelibs (at) gmail (dot) com for questions, comments, or concerns. Please tag your Web content with savelibraries to make it easier for us to find and collect it.

Kudos to none other than our own Blake Carver and LISHost.org for donating hosting for this site and getting WordPress up and running within minutes. This site is dedicated to advocacy for libraries–getting the message out about why libraries are important.

We’re looking for advocacy information, testimonials from patrons and staff, photos, videos, anything to help save our libraries. Please pitch in!! Use the tag savelibraries or #savelibraries on Twitter. If you would like to contribute to this site please email [email protected].

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