IT Security For Libraries

IT Security For Libraries

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #228

Submitted by StephenK on Sun, 01/13/2013 - 23:36

This week's program deals with Wikipedia hoaxing, an Internet icon, and a miscellany of brief items.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. The list of hardware sought to replace our ever-increasing damage control report can be found here and can be directly purchased and sent to assist The Air Staff in rebuilding to a more normal operations capability.

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Simple tricks websites can use to fingerprint you

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 10/15/2012 - 08:09

The "I Know..." series of blog posts shows relatively simple tricks [malicious] websites can use to coax a browser into revealing information that it probably should not. Firewalls, anti-virus software, anti-phishing scam black lists, and even patching your browser was not going to help.

Fortunately, if you are using one of today’s latest and greatest browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, etc.), these tricks, these attack techniques, mostly don’t work anymore. The unfortunate part is that they were by no means the only way to accomplish these feats.

SEC4LIB The Place To Learn About IT Security Issues In Libraries

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 09/18/2012 - 11:48

You might be interested in the new(ish) list where we talk about IT Security stuff, SEC4LIB. It's low volume and you'll probably learn a few things about security issues.

You may also like to check out the IT Security For Libraries section here at LISNews: http://lisnews.org/security

Are your mobile apps spying on you?

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 02/17/2012 - 09:12

Are your mobile apps spying on you?
Why is this a big deal? Because phone numbers are some of the most personal information available about anyone. They are a semi-permanent unique identification number that also serves as a direct way to reach you at all times. Giving someone else your number means you trust them to not abuse it, call you at 3 a.m. for no reason, or spray paint it on a restroom wall.

Keeping Current In IT Security

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 09/12/2011 - 15:04

I have a bunch of feeds in my feed reader dedicated to security now. You probably don't need to read that much about security! If so, here's an OPML file: http://lisnews.org/files/security-opml.xml

If that's too much (and it almost certainly is) here are some recommended sources I think you'll find will keep you up to date in the field, and won't overwhelm you with too much information!

Recommended - Easy To Follow:

15 tips for social media security in libraries

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 09/07/2011 - 09:12

This is part Nine in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries.
Part 8 was the first half of this post, Social Media Security In Libraries
In Part 7 I listed many lists full of practical advice that covered just about everything dealing with IT security in libraries.

Social Media Security In Libraries

Submitted by Blake on Fri, 09/02/2011 - 12:14
This is part Eight in my many part series on IT Security In Libraries. In Part 7 I listed many lists full of practical advice that covered just about everything dealing with IT security in libraries. Part Six was really the first part of this post. I dealt with security in libraries, mostly theory, while this post is more practical, and is mostly lists. In part 5 I covered 20 Common Security Myths, and how to defeat them. Part 4 was a general "How To Stay Safe Online" post that covered topics like patching/updating, watching links and downloads, and using good passwords. In Part Three I covered passwords. In part 2 we talked privacy. In Part One I tried to lay the foundation for security. Libraries and librarians are fully embracing social media sites like Twitter, LinkedIN and Facebook. Our libraries use them to connect with and engage our patrons, increase library visibility and communicate information. We each use them to connect with old friends, sell ourselves, stay up to date with the world around us, and keep in touch with family. There are serious security risks involved with most social sites that can be avoided by following some very simple rules. The bad guys are finding it very easy to use these sites to cause trouble. Scammers, stalkers, phishers, spammers, hackers and every other kind of evil doer on the internet are finding new ways to get into our social networks every day. They are using links to spread malware and spam, and they're always one step ahead. They're using it to fill social media sites with evil, e.g. chat bots, captcha crackers, malware, spam, control botnets, blackhat SEO, etc…